slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Silas Oluka CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Silas Oluka CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 28

Silas Oluka CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 79 Views
  • Uploaded on

Developing an Information Literacy Programme for Lifelong Learning for Africa : Information Literacy Toolkits for Universities. Silas Oluka CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA. AGENDA. Share the CBU and UB journey into the Information Literacy Toolkit development process

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Silas Oluka CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA' - steffi


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Developing anInformation Literacy Programme for Lifelong Learning for Africa:Information Literacy Toolkits for Universities

Silas Oluka

CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT

UNIVERSITY OF BOTSWANA

agenda
AGENDA

Share the CBU and UB journey into the Information Literacy Toolkit development process

Highlight key elements of each of the four toolkits developed

Reflect on lessons learnt and way forward

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

quality of learning in african universities
QUALITY OF LEARNING IN AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES
    • Most students are unable to execute thinking, reasoning, and understanding.
    • There is less inquiry learning, more rote learning.
    • Higher education graduates from most universities are labeled by the job market as being impractical, theoretical, unproductive, unskilled
    • Our countries are vying for an educated citizenry, but tertiary institutions lack a clear framework of defining, and implementing what is true quality education.
  • This is an education that would not suit an industrial age, let alone an information age society.

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

higher education challenge
HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE
  • Universities are grappling with producing graduates who have: self directed lifelong learning skills; critical, analytical and creative thinking skills; communication skills; research skills and information literacy.
  • In industrialised nations:
    • Information Literacy systems exist to develop and strengthen these skills;
    • graduates are well-positioned to manage and investigate information, think critically and carry out thorough and high-quality research;
    • IL has been well embraced at all levels of learning and work environments to bring about productivity, effective leadership, change management through lifelong learning

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

delphe funded il project
DELPHE FUNDED IL PROJECT

GOAL 1: Link institutional teaching and learning strategies with information literacy developments through the establishment of collaborative partnerships between academics and librarians;

GOAL 2: Promote institutional recognition of the importance of integrating IL in the curriculum for lifelong learning

GOAL 3: Advocate for institutionally recognized frameworks which will assist librarians and academics to embed IL in their programmes

GOAL 4: Create opportunities for staff development and training in higher education teaching methods

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

process design of baseline studies at ub and cbu
PROCESS: DESIGN OF BASELINE STUDIES AT UB AND CBU

The studies were designed to establish extent to which IL is practitioner-centred.

Focus: curriculum-based information activities; the learning process from the an institutional effectiveness/ academic quality perspective.

Data was variously collected: surveys; a series of focus groups; and individual discussions and interviews with subject faculty, students and library professionals

The data elicited related to IL conceptions, IL and IT skills and knowledge presence in the curriculum; IL and IT in course learning and assessment activities; and institutional support for IL-IT

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

process analysis and interpretation of findings
PROCESS: ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF FINDINGS
  • At least 6 rounds of group discussions with teaching academics and librarians at UB and CBU gathered additional views and conceptions through reflective workshops.
  • Dissemination of baseline findings: a reflective process; path-finding:
    • Joint Project workshops (what, how, why, with whom)
    • Video conferencing with UAD
    • Piloting IL integration in GE courses - UB CSSU Experience
  • Focus on implications/ lessons learnt

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

process
PROCESS
  • Literature search: (what, how, why, with whom)
    • ACRL
    • SCONUL
    • ALA
    • Australian Model
  • University of Abertay model
  • What wil best serve AU? Drafting of IL toolkits
  • Strategic Approach: Periodic briefs to institutional management and staff: feedback and advocacy

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

challenges faced by students
CHALLENGES FACED BY STUDENTS

IL is mastery of subject matter as provided by teacher

Failure to manage transition from secondary to tertiary mode of learning and teaching (learning and delivery mode at secondary school different from university – calls for independent learning)

Education system promotes dependence – notes, discussions, recall-nature of assessment

Student laziness – Google

Student read to pass exams

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

challenges faced by students1
CHALLENGES FACED BY STUDENTS
  • Student’s background : urban vs rural: private vs public
  • Introduction to new methods of teaching -learning and research approaches
    • Teacher makes no mistake,
    • One text book as gospel
    • Transition challenges
  • Personal attitudes of student’s

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

challenges faced by students2
CHALLENGES FACED BY STUDENTS

Bandwidth challenge which limits access to resources ( downloading takes forever)

Student’s not having laptops and access to computer labs after working hours

Lack of remote access to resources off -campus

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

challenges faced by students3
CHALLENGES FACED BY STUDENTS

Size of classes e.g. most class are so large – creates a challenge e.g: interaction; access to computers

Students are adolescents still growing up and struggle to balance independent learning responsibilities and freedom

Part-time students – conflicting responsibilities (work, family and student life)

Curriculum is fully packed with discipline content and students perpetually engaged in class; no room to be in the library and engage in other activities

Distance education student – teacher centred material, very limited deep learning opportunities

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

challenges academics and librarians
CHALLENGES – ACADEMICS AND LIBRARIANS

Curriculum that is not flexible and too compact

Teaching strategies do not promote IL

Lack information/understanding on the role of the librarians;

IL competencies and lessons by Librarians to students are a waste of time, or an add-on that is not assessed (= not important)

Issues of plagiarism inadequately pursued at institutional level

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

il in the curriculum and institutional support
IL IN THE CURRICULUM AND INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

There is no concentrated effort on the part of technology specialists, faculty, librarians, and administrators, on integrating information literacy and technology into the academic curriculum in a meaningful way

Proficiency entails knowing the mechanisms of computer use as well as applying advanced cognitive skills in retrieving, evaluating and communicating information

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

il in the curriculum and institutional support1
IL IN THE CURRICULUM AND INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT

Basic computer competencies such as learning how to use email, operating systems, word processors, graphics programs, and spreadsheets are taught at both institutions

Higher cognitive skills (information competencies) that engage students in higher level thinking and problem-solving skills so that they can locate and retrieve information; determine relevant information; develop strong search strategies, and critically evaluate, manage, and communicate information – are generally lacking

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

african universities challenge
AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES CHALLENGE

“to prepare students effectively for life, work, and citizenship so that they will be able to contribute to economic and social development, adapt to change and provide leadership.”

UB Learning and Teaching Policy Statement: p.3

Need for Information Literacy Toolkits

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

african universities challenge towards il toolkits
AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES CHALLENGE: Towards IL Toolkits
  • How can we move forward with the current understanding and experience, in advancing the IL agenda to use IL as a catalyst to transforming the information culture of higher education students?
  • What strategies and mechanisms need to be pursued to leverage our key clientele’s (the students’) experiences towards a learning society for tomorrow?

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

il toolkit 1 an il framework
IL TOOLKIT 1: AN IL FRAMEWORK

Vision:

  • Champion development of information literacy and use of digital technology and communications tools, and/or networks in Africa context to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, create and communicate information in order to function in a knowledge society.

Mission

  • To provide a harmonized approach for development, assessment, diagnosis, and continuous improvement of basic information and communications (ICT) digital literacy skills for tertiary level students and workforce for sub-Sahara Africa by building upon:
    • The definition of information and ICT literacy in the ACRL and other international associations and organizations as cited across the document.
    • The demands that a functionality of the knowledge society for the 21st Century hinges on information and ICT literacy.
    • Global trends, standards and performance indicators for Information and ICT literacy.

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

il toolkit 1 an il framework1
IL TOOLKIT 1: AN IL FRAMEWORK

Element 1: Environmental Scan

Element 2: Vision and Mission of IL programme

Element 3: Goals and Objectives of IL programme

Element 4: Strategic and Operational Planning

Element 5: Management and Institutional Support

Element 6: Articulation with the Institutional Curriculum

Element 7: Information and ICT Literacy Pedagogy

Element 8: Staffing

Element 9: Collaboration

Element 10: Outreach

Element 11: Assessment/Monitoring and Evaluation

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

toolkit 2 information literacy curriculum
TOOLKIT 2: INFORMATION LITERACY CURRICULUM

Vision:

Embed information literacy across course structures for excellence and lifelong learning

Mission:

To proactively advance the development and implementation of information literacy in higher education in order to:

foster students’ abilities to build upon the foundation of information literacy knowledge by successfully transferring this learning from course to course, understanding the critical and empowering role of information in providing solutions, and producing new ideas and directions for the future for a free and democratic society, and demonstrating ethical behavior and academic integrity as consumers, as well as producers, and users of information.

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

toolkit 2 information literacy curriculum1
TOOLKIT 2: INFORMATION LITERACY CURRICULUM

Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education - ACRL

  • determines the nature and extent of needed information;
  • accesses needed information effectively and efficiently;
  • evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system;
  • uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose;
  • understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

toolkit 3 information literacy pedagogical framework
TOOLKIT 3: INFORMATION LITERACY PEDAGOGICAL FRAMEWORK

Toolkit Vision:

  • To build optimal human resource capacity with competencies in information literacy pedagogical knowledge and skills

Toolkit Mission:

  • facilitate an interdisciplinary discourse on the relationship information literacy competencies, ICTs, library skills, and institutional education strategies in higher education for social change
  • generate pedagogical methodologies and competencies for successfully introducing information literacy within developing countries
  • ensure that student assignments act as public resources through our class wiki
  • develop explore strategies for use of library resources for teaching ICTs and information literacy
  • promote peer learning and interdisciplinary collaboration among academics, librarians and students in IL pedagogy

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

toolkit 4 advocacy for advancing information literacy
TOOLKIT 4: ADVOCACY FOR ADVANCING INFORMATION LITERACY

Toolkit Vision:

to equip academic staff, librarians, academic and professional development providers with mechanism and information tools for grassroots information literacy (IL) advocacy.

Toolkit Mission:

Developing the self-confidence and advocacy skills of information literacy providers, so that they can advocate for their IL engagements on campuses, within academic departments and other campus units, within college and university senate governance, and/ or within their library settings. To that end, this toolkit is designed to provide participants with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to integrate knowledge and understanding of leadership, power and persuasion into the organization to drive academic excellence for lifelong learning.

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

toolkit 4 advocacy for advancing information literacy1
TOOLKIT 4: ADVOCACY FOR ADVANCING INFORMATION LITERACY

Reciprocation

People feel indebted to those who do something for them

Social Proof

People want to know what everyone else is doing – especially their peers.

Commitment and Consistency

People do not like to back out of deals

Liking

People tend to prefer to say ‘yes’ to those they know and like.

Authority

People want to follow the lead of real experts

Scarcity

The more rare and special a thing, the more people want it

Psychology of persuasion, Robert Cialdini, 1993

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

learning points and way forward
LEARNING POINTS AND WAY FORWARD

There is no institution that is in a better position to provide citizens with the information skills and literacy that they need than (one) which forms a part of compulsory curriculum.

The vision of the information literate community is that skills for searching for information and handling of data will be integrated with the subject teaching. Children of the future should learn how to deal with information at the same time as they learn their subjects. That is the only way we can prepare them for an uncertain future (SigrunHannesdottir, 1999)

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team

slide28

THANK YOU

S Oluka for UB DELPHE IL Team