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  1. Kidztown adult training Unit: The Exile Began – Feb 2014

  2. Unit: The Exile Began Week 1 – Jeremiah Warned of God’s Judgment (Jeremiah 1) Week 2 – Judah Was Taken into Captivity (2 Chronicles 36:1-21) Week 3 – Ezekiel Prophesied to the Exiles (Ezekiel 10) Week 4 – Ezekiel Told About a Future Hope (Ezekiel 37)

  3. Lesson1: February 2, 2014 Jeremiah Warned of God’s Judgment (Jeremiah 36)

  4. Timeline of Book of Jeremiah 639–609 b.c.—the reign of Josiah 609 b.c. (3 months)—the reign of Jehoahaz 609–597 b.c.—the reign of Jehoiakim 597 b.c. (3 months)—the reign of Jehoiachin (Coniah, Jeconiah, Jechoniah) 597–586 b.c.—the reign of Zedekiah 586 b.c.—the Fall of Jerusalem 586(?) b.c.—the assassination of Gedaliah 626 b.c.—the call of Jeremiah 612 b.c.—the Fall of Nineveh 609 b.c.—the death of Josiah at Megiddo 605 b.c.—the Battle of Carchemish and the Fall of the Assyrian Empire 605 b.c.—the first siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar (Daniel exiled to Babylon) 597 b.c.—the second siege of Jerusalem 588–586 b.c.—the final siege of Jerusalem, beginning the Babylonian captivity Charles L. Feinberg, Jeremiah, in The Expositors Bible Commentary: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel (ed. Frank E. Gaebelein; vol. 6; Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1986), 363. Rulers of this Period Events of this Period Lesson 1

  5. God’s Command to Write • Specific date of Jeremiah’s first writing, 605 B.C. (36:1) • The subject of Jeremiah’s writing (36:2; see also 2 Pet 1:20-21) Lesson 1

  6. God’s Command to Write • Specific date of Jeremiah’s first writing, 605 B.C. (36:1) • The subject of Jeremiah’s writing (36:2; see also 2 Pet 1:20-21) • The purpose of Jeremiah’s writing – repentance (36:3) Lesson 1

  7. God’s Command to Write • Specific date of Jeremiah’s first writing, 605 B.C. (36:1) • The subject of Jeremiah’s writing (36:2; see also 2 Pet 1:20-21) • The purpose of Jeremiah’s writing – repentance (36:3) • The mechanics of writing – Baruch the scribe (36:4-6) Lesson 1

  8. Various Responses to the Message • Micaiah – recognized the importance of the message and reported same to the king’s scribes (36:11-13) • Officials of the scribal chamber – fear, most likely because Jeremiah’s message of doom was just the opposite of what King Jehoiakim had been telling the people (36:16-19) • King Jehoiakim – “Nah, nah, nah – and imprison Baruch and Jeremiah!” (36:23-26) Lesson 1

  9. God’s Response to King Jehoiakim • Jeremiah to rewrite the scroll (36:28) • Pronounce a horrible judgment against the king and his descendants (36:29-30) • Pronounce the judgment of the nation was now at hand because of this last straw (36:31) Lesson 1

  10. Chronology of Jeremiah’s Writing • A suggested historical arrangement of the prophecies is as follows: • Reign of Josiah chs. 1–6 • Reign of Jehoahaz nothing (cf. 22:10–12) • Reign of Jehoiakim 7:1–13:17; 13:20–20:18; 25–26; 35–36; 45:1–46:12; 47; 48 (?); 49 • Reign of Jehoiachin 13:18–19; chs. 22–23 (?) • Reign of Zedekiah chs. 21; 24; 27–34; 37–44; 46:13–28; 50–52 Charles L. Feinberg, Jeremiah, in The Expositors Bible Commentary: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel (ed. Frank E. Gaebelein; vol. 6; Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Publishing House, 1986), 367. Lesson 1

  11. Reason for Nonchronological Writing “As the exile came nearer, God commanded Jeremiah to write down the messages that He had already given orally (30:2) and to add to them new divine promises of return from exile and of other blessings in the more distant future (30:3, 10-11). Jehoiakim destroyed Jeremiah’s scroll (36:23). God commanded Jeremiah to dictate a new scroll. Jeremiah did so, reproducing the contents of the previous scroll, which probably had been arranged in the order in which God had originally given them. But he added at the proper places certain other inspired discussion of the same subjects (36:32). Later on Jeremiah inserted messages received at later times but logically related to messages previously given, putting them at the appropriate places within the scroll already written, as for instance, chs. 21; 24; 27-29; 32-34. Other messages given after the new scroll was written were added in the order in which they were received, and these were followed by certain special sections (chs. 45-52). Thus the arrangement of the book is partly according to the time the messages were given, and partly according to the nature of the subject matter.” C. I. Scofield, ed., New Scofield Study Bible (New York: World Bible Publishers, 1988), note 6, 1075. Lesson 1

  12. Truths for Today • “First, God speaks to man. He desires to communicate and have communion with him. • Second, he speaks in various ways. He spoke to Jehoaikim through a godly father, Josiah. Most of us have at least one “Josiah” in our lives. Also, he spoke to Jehoaikim through trouble. He also addresses us through trial. Further, he spoke to Jehoaikim through the written word. He speaks to us through the written word, the spoken word, and the “living” Word. • Third, God’s word may be accepted or rejected. God does not override the human will. Man can say yes or no to God. Jehoaikim said no. • Fourth, though God’s word can be rejected—even rent—it cannot be abrogated. It is going on. It is indestructible (Isa. 40:8).” Leo J. Green, Jeremiah, in The Teachers Bible Commentary (ed. H. Franklin Paschall and Herschel H. Hobbs; Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers, 1972), 473. Lesson 1

  13. Lesson 2: February 9, 2014 Judah Was Taken into Captivity (2 Chronicles 36:1-21)

  14. Countdown to Disaster • 609 B.C. – Pharaoh Neco defeats King Josiah at Megiddo, mortally wounding him. • Judah responds by making Josiah’s son Jehoahaz king. (36:1-2) • Pharaoh Neco subjugates Judah, carries Jehoahaz to Egypt, and places Jehoiakim (formerly Eliakim, Jehoahaz’solder brother). (36:3-5) • 605 B.C. – Pharaoh Neco’s army defeated by the Babylonians at Carchemish. Lesson 2

  15. Countdown to Disaster • In the same year the Babylonians capture Jerusalem, bind Jehoiakim with bronze chains (36:6) but don’t deport him. They do, however, deport many Jews as hostages including the prophet Daniel. • Jehoiakim rebelled against the Babylonians only to die in 598 B.C. during the first Babylonian siege. • His son Jehoiachin becomes king only to give up the city three months later (597 B.C.). He, his entire family, the nobles and the rest of the ablest citizens were deported to Babylon thus crippling Judah. Lesson 2

  16. Countdown to Disaster • After Jehoiachin’s deportation, Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon installs Jehoiachin’s uncle, Mattaniah renamed Zedekiah, on the throne. • Zedekiah rebelled against Babylon (36:13) for which Jerusalem was sieged in 588 B.C. and fell in 586 B.C. Zedekiah had his sons executed in front of him and then his eyes put out. He died in a Babylonian prison. • Thousands of citizens were slaughtered, the Temple robbed, knocked down and burned, and thousands more of the people were deported. (36:17-21) Lesson 2

  17. Why Judah Went into Captivity • Every strata of the nation was unfaithful (36:14) • Those same people not only refused God’s call to repentance but “mocked the messengers of God, despised His words and scoffed at His prophets” (36:15-16) Lesson 2

  18. Truths for Today • Take every decision to the Lord. • God allows bad circumstances in our lives to refine us and draw us nearer to Him. • Any gains from doing wrong only last a relatively short time. • Just because everyone says so doesn’t make the majority opinion right. Lesson 2

  19. Lesson 3: February 16, 2014 Ezekiel Prophesied to the Exiles (Ezekiel 10)

  20. Background of Ezekiel • Author – Priest and prophet during Israel’s Babylonian exile. • Ezekiel was a descendant of the influential priestly family of Zadok (Ez 1:3). All that is known of his personal life is obtained from the OT book of Ezekiel. • Ezekiel was married (24:16–18) and lived at Tel-abib in Babylonia (3:15), in his own house (3:24; 8:1). Most of the Judean captives had settled by the Kebar Canal (1:3). The elders of Israel there sought out Ezekiel for counsel (8:1; 14:1; 20:1). In the fifth year of the exile, when Ezekiel was between 25 and 30 years old, he received God’s call to the prophetic office (1:1–3:11). His wife died suddenly during the exile, but he was forbidden to mourn for her in public (24:16–18). Lesson 3

  21. Background of Ezekiel • Ministry Period – seems to have extended from 592 bc to at least the 27th year of the exile (29:17) [570 bc]. It falls into two main periods. During the first period (592–587 bc), his messages were repeated warnings intended to lead the exiles to repentance and faith in God. During the second period (586–570 bc), after Nebuchadnezzar’s destruction of Jerusalem and the temple, the prophet comforted the exiles and encouraged them to look to the future in hope (chs 33–48). There were 13 years in which no prophetic utterances were delivered, namely 585 bc (32:1, 17; 33:21) to 572 bc (40:1). Contemporary of the prophets Jeremiah and Daniel. Lesson 3

  22. Background of Ezekiel • Message Judah was ripe for judgment. At first the messages were not accepted, but later his prophecies were vindicated as they began to come true and as the nation was purged of its idolatry. • The place and circumstances of his death are unknown, and Ezekiel is not mentioned elsewhere in the OT. Wesley Comfort, Tyndale Bible Dictionary (Tyndale reference library; Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001), 461. Lesson 3

  23. Theological Values of Ezekiel • The nature of God – mostly as related to the covenant; i.e., righteous and holy • The purpose & nature of God’s judgment – (1) make Israel conscious of her sin & bring her back to Him; and (2) Israel & the other nations would know that He is the one true God Lesson 3

  24. Theological Values of Ezekiel • The nature of God – mostly as related to the covenant; i.e., righteous and holy • The purpose & nature of God’s judgment – (1) make Israel conscious of her sin & bring her back to Him; and (2) Israel & the other nations would know that He is the one true God • Individual responsibility • The ethical, religious, and moral history of Israel • The nature of Israel’s restoration and the millennial worship Lesson 3

  25. Ezekiel 10 – God’s Glory Departs • Setting Lesson 3

  26. Ezekiel 10 – God’s Glory Departs • Setting • Characters • Cherubim – Lesson 3

  27. Ezekiel 10 – God’s Glory Departs • Setting • Characters • Cherubim – • “He” – Lesson 3

  28. Ezekiel 10 – God’s Glory Departs • Setting • Characters • Cherubim – • “He” – • “the man clothed in linen” Lesson 3

  29. Walk thru Ezekiel 10 • God orders the man in linen to spread hot coals over the city of Jerusalem. (1-2) • Description of the scene (3-5) Lesson 3

  30. Walk thru Ezekiel 10 • God orders the man in linen to spread hot coals over the city of Jerusalem. (1-2) • Description of the scene (3-5) • Description of the receipt of the coals (6-7) • Description of the cherubim and final departure of God’s glory from the Temple (8-22) Lesson 3

  31. Truth for Today • When mortal sin comes into conflict with God’s glory the fires of judgment must fall. It will either purify and make one ready for service as in Isaiah’s inaugural vision or it will be a consuming fire to destroy. • As God’s glory was mobile, so we must be flexible in our spiritual lives. Many changes are taking place today. We must be able to cope with these quick transitions and carry godly lives into the midst of any situation. Fred M. Wood, Ezekiel, in The Teachers Bible Commentary (ed. H. Franklin Paschall and Herschel H. Hobbs; Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers, 1972), 498. Lesson 3

  32. Lesson 4: February 23, 2014 Ezekiel Told About a Future Hope (Ezekiel 37)

  33. Getting From Ezekiel 10 to 37 • God pours out His wrath on Israel (11) • Exiles complain but Ezekiel answers (12-19) • Exiles reminded of wicked past for which they were rightfully condemned (20-23) • Fall of Jerusalem & Judah (24) • Judgment of foreign nations (25-33:20) • Would Israel get their land back? (33:21-33) • Yes! (34) • Invaders will be removed (35) • Israel will be restored to the land (36) Lesson 4

  34. Walk thru Ezekiel 37 • This chapter is an apocalyptic vision of Israel’s future restoration. Lesson 4

  35. Walk thru Ezekiel 37 • This chapter is an apocalyptic vision of Israel’s future restoration. • Setting – an unnamed valley filled with “very dry” bones (37:1-2) • The vision – dry bones which are miraculously regenerated into living people (37:3-10) • The interpretation of the vision (37:11-14) Lesson 4

  36. Walk thru Ezekiel 37 • This chapter is an apocalyptic vision of Israel’s future restoration. • Setting – an unnamed valley filled with “very dry” bones (37:1-2) • The vision – dry bones which are miraculously regenerated into living people (37:3-10) • The interpretation of the vision (37:11-14) • The sign of the two sticks – the reunion of the Northern and Southern Kingdoms of Israel (37:15-17) Lesson 4

  37. Walk thru Ezekiel 37 • The interpretation of the sign of two sticks (37:18-28) Lesson 4

  38. Truth for Today • This passage does not teach the resurrection of the body . . . . [However t]he God who raised up a dead nation and reestablished it in its homeland is certainly capable of raising up a dead body. • Regardless of how deep into rebellion and wickedness an individual has gone, God can restore him and make him a new person in Christ Jesus. • Although the destructive effects of sin have exposed one to the sad ravages of death, he is not hopeless. In Jesus, God’s power is unlimited to raise a sinner from spiritual death and make him truly born again of the Spirit. What God does for the individual he can do for a nation in our day. Fred M. Wood, Ezekiel, in The Teachers Bible Commentary (ed. H. Franklin Paschall and Herschel H. Hobbs; Nashville: Broadman and Holman Publishers, 1972), 518. Lesson 4