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The High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) for Student-Built Payloads. T.G. Guzik and J.P. Wefel Dept. of Physics & Astronomy Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA U.S.A. Student-Built Payload Limitations.

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The High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) for Student-Built Payloads


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    1. The High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) for Student-Built Payloads T.G. Guzik and J.P. Wefel Dept. of Physics & Astronomy Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA U.S.A. COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    2. Student-Built Payload Limitations • Many higher education institutions across U.S. are engaging students in design, construction and operation of aerospace payloads (See ACES presentation, this conference) • Small payloads launched on sounding balloons • Compact Earth-orbiting satellites • Development life cycle needs to be limited to one year to conform with student schedule • Feasible with small sounding balloon payloads • Difficult for satellites where launch schedule is uncertain, but could be flight tested on a balloon COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    3. Sounding Balloon Limitations • Sounding balloons have limited “hang time” • Total flight time about 2 ½ hours • Time above 24 km about ½ hour • Inappropriate for testing student-built satellites or new technologies • At most only cursory evaluation of power, data acquisition & telemetry subsystems • No test of day-night thermal cycling COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    4. HASP Addresses These Issues • Support & flight test multiple student built payloads • Altitude > 36 km, duration of ~20 hours • Make use of NASA National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF) experience • Provide standard power, data, mechanical interface • Use CubeSat model for design • Developed by Stanford and CalPoly • Size is 10 cm cube • Max weight is 1 kg • Power is ~650 mW COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    5. Configuration & Structure • Core aluminum frame provides platform integrity • Mounting for flight data / control systems • Attachment for swivel harness and ballast hopper • Composite braces to support student payloads COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    6. Concept Student Payload Interface • Mounting plate consistent with CubeSat model • Held at corner beams so faces are unobstructed • Mounting plate includes power & data interface • Can be sent to institution for pre-integration • Alternate mounting is also possible • Specify hole pattern on support braces • Heavier payloads could be mounted on top of Al structure • ICD determined during student payload application COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    7. Weight & Size • HASP dimensions • Core frame is 112 cm (44”) by 91.5 cm (36”) by 51 cm (20”) tall • Student payload braces extend 112 cm away from frame • Total dimensions are, thus, ~3.4 m x 3.2 m x 0.5 m • Weight determined mostly by measured values • Total is 211 kg (465 lbs) COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    8. Command and Control • Heritage from ATIC scientific balloon payload systems • Directly adopt flight proven hardware and software design • Flight Control Unit (FCU) • Handles commands • Monitors power system • Serial link with payloads • Collects status information • Data Archive Unit (DAU) • On-board data recording • LOS transmission of HASP & student payload data to ground at rate up to ~ 300 kilobits per second • NSBF supplied CIP controls balloon systems COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    9. FCU Hardware Flight Control Unit front (left) and back (right) flown on the ATIC-02 experiment from December 29, 2002 to January 18, 2003 COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    10. DAU Hardware Data Archive Unit (left) and Hard Disk Pressure Vessel (right) flown on the ATIC-02 experiment from December 29, 2002 to January 18, 2003 COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    11. Power System • Route 28V buss and convert power locally • Power budget from measured values & includes an 80% efficiency factor • 24 hour lifetime with two 10 cell lithium battery packs COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    12. Anticipated Flight Operations • Flight Ops take place at NSBF or Ft. Sumner • Initially HASP is setup & integrated with NSBF systems • Student payload integration & testing follows • Launch tries to target “turn-around” conditions COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation

    13. Summary • The High Altitude Student Platform supports advanced student-built payloads • Regular schedule of launches at least once per year • Provide high altitude (~36 km) and reasonable duration (~15 to 20 hours) • Flight test student-built satellite • Fly payloads too heavy for sounding balloons • Existing flight designs and experience minimize cost of development and operation • Hardware / software from flight proven ATIC payload • Use time-tested NSBF balloon vehicle hardware • Capitalize on decades of NSBF experience with flight operations • Could be easily adapted for LDB (~15 – 30 days) flights • Could become major part of Aerospace Workforce Development COSPAR 2004, HASP Presentation