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High Altitude Platform based Wireless Network

High Altitude Platform based Wireless Network

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High Altitude Platform based Wireless Network

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  1. HighAltitude Platform based Wireless Network Summer2009 ICT TUWien Ha Yoon Song, Guestprofessor song@ict.tuwien.ac.at

  2. PSL IPL HAP Ground station Switch / Gateway IP

  3. Broadband Communications via High Altitude Platforms(HAPs) – A survey S. Karapantazis and F.-N. Pavlidou

  4. Introduction(1) • High Altitude Platforms(HAPs) • Stratospheric Platforms(SPFs) • Height 17 ~ 22Km • fromhot-air balloons • Advantage of • Satellite Communication System • Terrestrial Wireless System

  5. Introduction(2) • Easy to deploy, incremental deploy • Flexibility, Reconfigurability • Low cost of operation (comparing to Satellites) • Low propagation delay • High Elevation! • Wide area coverage • Broadcast/Multicast • Mobility ! • BUT, Problems with • Monitoring of Station • Airship manufacturing • Antenna technology

  6. Introduction(4) • HAPs for 3G+ system because of • Easy to maintain • Easy to deploy • Lower path loss • 4G : Satellite + HAPS = MBMS. • Stand aloneHAPs for low population with large area.

  7. Aerial Vehicles, Key Issues and Spectrum Allocation • Three types • Propulsion + unmanned airships(balloons, aerostats) • High Altitude Long Endurance Platforms(HALE Platforms) Solar-powered unmanned aircraft • Manned aircraft(???)

  8. Key Issues • Airship HOVERING • GPS • Diesel Motors + Solar powered

  9. Spectrum Allocation • ITU allocates HAPs frequency with 48/47GHz +600MHz • shared with satellite • OR for 3G, 2GHz • For broadband, fixed application 18-32GHz • Table 5.

  10. Architectures and Services I-Network Design- • High reliability • Low power consumption • Lighter payload • Max 150KM footprint by ITU • Min. 5 degree of elevation • Recommended 15+ degree to avoid clutter

  11. Architectures and Services(2) -Network Design- • Frequency Reuse • Cellular architecture • High Bandwidth for Broadband application • Fixed Channel Allocation(FCA) • Dynamic Channel Allocation(DCA) • HeliNet Network • CAPANINA

  12. Architectures and Services(3) -Network Design- • Backhaul links, duplicated • High traffic for down link • Asymmetry to uplink • Multiple uplinks for backhaul station

  13. Architectures and Services(4) -Network Design- • Macrocell andmicrocell architecture (Fig.12) • Rural macrocell (Fig.13) • Sectoring. (Fig.14) for system capacity

  14. Architectures and Services(5) -Network Design- • Ring-shaped Cell Clustering (Fig. 15). • Coaxial Rings • Multi-beam, controllable antenna • Simpler handoff design • Cell scanning (Fig. 16) • Stratospheric radio-relay Maritime ( Fig.17 )

  15. Architectures and Services -Capacity- • Bandwidth • Cell size depends on Antenna • Directional Antenna • Interference (Fig.20)

  16. Channel Modeling and Transmission Techniques( Transmission and Coding 1 ) • HeliNet : QP,, QAM, M-PSK(starQAM), CPM, GMSK, MA-MSK) • Table 11 • Elevation!

  17. Antennas(1) • Requirements • High frequency for High bandwidth • High gain, directional antenna • Multibeam antenna with 100+ beams • Fig. 34 for footprint • Beam controllability • Low payload and low power • Reliability

  18. Antennas(2) • Array of the antenna at 2.2Ghz, 21Km height • Wider array with high altitude, narrower array with high frequency • Multibeam Horn(MBH) • Digital Beamforming(DBF) • Table XⅡ