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A Success Strategy for Cross-Jurisdictional Collaboration. October 2004 Mike Giovinazzo & Joanne Harrington. V 0-2. Agenda. The essence of collaboration The evolution of a common strategy Key aspects of the approach A sample case study Project Summary Approach overview

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a success strategy for cross jurisdictional collaboration

A Success Strategy for Cross-Jurisdictional Collaboration

October 2004

Mike Giovinazzo &

Joanne Harrington

V 0-2

agenda
Agenda
  • The essence of collaboration
  • The evolution of a common strategy
  • Key aspects of the approach
  • A sample case study
    • Project Summary
    • Approach overview
    • Sample exhibits
    • Key Findings
  • Question Period
the essence of collaboration
The Essence Of Collaboration
  • Not very easy
    • Each party has their own mandate, priorities and constraints
  • It can be (and has been done)
  • The secret is locating the common ground, respecting autonomy and building a value chain that contributes to common goals
finding common ground
Finding Common Ground
  • Contributing to related Outcomes
  • Exercising related Authorities
  • Addressing related Target Groups
  • Meeting related Needs
  • Delivering related Services
  • Recognizing related Events
  • Executing related Business Processes
  • Using related Information

Effective Collaboration depends on proper alignment

alignment examples
Alignment Examples
  • Two programs require alignment when they recognize the same target groups and/or needs in overlapping jurisdictions.
  • They are aligned when their goals and strategies have been harmonized or conflicts are reduced to a minimum.
  • A service is aligned with a program when it contributes to a program’s goals by meeting target group needs designated by the program, in a way consistent with the program’s strategy
program alignment model

Program Owner: ACOA

Jurisdiction: Atlantic Canada

Outcome Goals: Increased rate of new business formation

Program Owner: ACOA

Jurisdiction: Atlantic Canada

Outcome Goals: Higher levels

of investment

Program: Entrepreneurship and

Business Skills Development

Program: Access to Capital and Information

Educational

Institutions

Post-Secondary

Students

Businesses

Entrepreneurs

SMEs

Program: Supply

Program Owner: PWGSC

Jurisdiction: Canada

Outcome Goals: Higher

levels of Canadian supply

Rural

Communities

Aboriginal

Communities

Program: Economic Development

Model shows target group overlaps of three

existing ACOA programs with economic development goals

Program Owner: ACOA

Jurisdiction: Atlantic Canada

Outcome Goals: Community Economic Growth

© Reproduced permission of Chartwell

Program Alignment Model
upper tier lower tier program alignment models

Provincial

Agricultural

Program

Provincial

Water Mgt

Program

Shoreline

Property

Owners

Farms

Municipal

Water Mgt

Program

Residents

Flood

Response

Service

Drinking

Water

Service

High/Low

Water Hazard

Service

© Reproduced permission of Chartwell

Upper Tier/Lower Tier Program Alignment Models
getting the job done

Getting the job done

A Proven Approach

in the beginning
In the beginning …
  • Municipal Government Need
    • Sanctioned by MISA (Municipal Information Systems Association)
    • Funded by a federal grant, Chartwell pioneered groundbreaking techniques
    • Generic enterprise model of municipal programs and services
    • Initially licensed to 27 Canadian municipalities and 2 foreign municipalities
  • Evolution to the Management Reference Model (MRM®) for Government Services
    • extended to include a broad range of government services from all tiers (local, regional, provincial, federal)
evolution
Evolution …
  • Provincial Government
    • Ontario adopted the approach and evolved the PSRM (Public Service Reference Model)
    • Used in key ministries and agencies
      • E.g. Land Resource Cluster (LRC) Water Program - basis of fundamental business re-engineering Basis of a detailed architecture framework and standards for the provinces Enterprise Information Architecture
    • Formal architecture methods, planning process and governance structure for the province
    • Stated benefits include:
        • provide fully integrated customer-centred service delivery
        • improve communications between business and IT stakeholders inside and outside the government
        • identify opportunities for business change

http://www.cio.gov.on.ca

evolution11
Evolution …
  • Government of Canada
    • Treasury Board’s new Business Transformation Enablement Program (BTEP) initiative
    • Projects include:
      • Information Management Enabler (Treasury Board Secretariat)
      • Secure Service Delivery Using E-forms (SSDUE) (Health, CCRA, RCMP)
      • Public Safety Information Sharing (Solicitor General Canada and Treasury Board Secretariat)
      • National Criminal Justice Index (RCMP)
      • Services to New Business (Industry Canada)
      • Seniors (Veterans Affairs Canada)
      • Statutes and Regulations (Justice Canada)
      • Business Architecture of Managing the Fisheries (Department of Fisheries and Oceans)

http://www.cio-dpi.gc.ca/btep-phto/index_e.asp

btep program synopsis
BTEP Program Synopsis?
  • Why - because the Government of Canada is committed to achieving a vision of citizen or client-centric service delivery across the whole of government.
  • A new way of thinking about and working collaboratively
  • Integrated methodology for planning, designing and implementing business transformation
  • Based on business design best practices and models suited to public sector organizations
btep components benefits
BTEP Components & Benefits
  • Components
    • GSRM (Government Strategic Reference Model)
    • Enablers (core business capabilities)
    • Transformation Framework
    • Transformation Deliverables
  • Benefits
    • Ensure that transformation initiatives across government are easier to coordinate, manage and sustain
    • Compatible business design across departments and agencies
    • More efficient and effective program structures and service delivery arrangements
    • Greater alignment of goals, programs and projects
btep the bottom line
BTEP – The Bottom Line

“… uses public service language. Senior executives will see business transformation proposals using concepts and terminology they recognize and understand. It will help executives and program managers better understand the business processes they are responsible for and more easily identify the programs with which they must interoperate to advance client-centred service delivery.”

btep transformation framework
BTEP Transformation Framework

Transformation Blueprint

Transformation

Roadmap

What

How

Where

Who

When

Why

Things important to the business

Programs

Services

Jurisdictions

Business locations

Geographical areas

Target Groups

Roles

Parties

Communities

Organizations

Workforce

Cycles

Events

Vision

Authorities

Needs, Targeted needs

Value statements

Outcomes

Environment things

  • Strategic Design & Planning Deliverables
  • Business Problem Assessment
  • Target Business Vision
  • Transformation Strategy
  • Target Business Design
  • Transformation Business Case
  • Transformation Master Plan
  • System Design & Planning Deliverables
  • e.g. as defined by RUP (Rational Unified Process) or UMM (UNCEFACT Modelling Methodology)

Scope & Context

Information

Model

Program Service Alignment Model

Service Integration & Alignment Model

Operations Model

Service level agreements

Logistics Model

Target Group Model

Community Model

Organization Responsibility Model

Culture Model

Events & Cycles Model

Target Group State Transition Model

Authorities Model

Performance Model

Conceptual

Logical data model

Application architecture

Use Cases

Distribution architecture

(Z - distributed system architecture)

Human interface architecture

Processing structure

Business rule model

Logical

Physical data model

System design

System architecture

Presentation architecture

Control structure

Rule design

Physical

Data definition

Program

Network architecture

Security architecture

Timing

definition

Rule specification

Implementation

Service requests

Service outputs

Process inputs

Process outputs

Service instances

Process instances

Physical locations

Channels

Service recipients

Workers

Service suppliers

Schedule

Performance actuals

Operating Plans

Operational

Operations Blueprint

mrm psrm gsrm vocabulary

Jurisdictions

Provider

Organizations

Target Groups

Governance

Outcomes

& Impacts

Programs

Accomplish

Services

Accountability

Roles

Individual

Clients

Outputs

Deliver

Responsibility

Processes

Authority

Used in

Resources

© Reproduced permission of Chartwell

MRM – PSRM – GSRM Vocabulary
btep service definition
BTEP Service Definition

Service:

  • A service is a set of processes that produces and delivers a service output. Also: a means, administered by a program, of producing an output to address one or more target group needs and contribute to the outcomes of one or more programs

Service Output:

  • A service output is an output with characteristics that distinguish it from other outputs in the same context (typically called intermediate or process outputs). These characteristics are:
    • Fulfilled purpose, completed production or finality from the service provider’s perspective;
    • Fulfilled intent or full obtainable value from the service recipient’s perspective, and
    • Repetition from a work designer’s perspective, in the sense that the service’s processes are designed to produce repeated instances of the service output.
    • Must be classifiable as one of the 19 GSRM service output types
    • Other useful terms for a service output are the “service delivery unit” or “unit of delivered service”.
services can provide value to multiple programs

MUNICIPAL RECREATION PROGRAM

PROVINCIAL

YOUTH PROGRAM

Administers

Supports achievement

and funds

of program goals

Supports achievement

of program goals

Swimming Pool

Access

Swimming Pool

FEDERAL HEALTH

PROGRAM

Access

Swimming Pool

Supports achievement

Access

Swimming Pool

of program goals

Access

SERVICE PORTFOLIO

© Reproduced permission of Chartwell

Services Can Provide Value to Multiple Programs
  • What is the relative contribution to the other programs?
  • What opportunities exist for co-funding?
  • How does this influence the “real value” of the service?
gsrm governments of canada strategic reference model
GSRM - Governments of Canada Strategic Reference Model
  • A set of models that can be used to depict how the GsOC currently serves Canadians and how it could in the future.
  • Provides a standardized approach to support consistent analysis of business processes across different types of programs and services.
  • Key analytical tool for designing business architecture (Framework Rows 1 & 2).
  • Features libraries of services and process patterns tailored to public sector setting and vocabulary, for alignment with IS design methods.
  • Features strong architectural specifications for public service business design - programs, services, accountabilities, performance measures.
btep phases deliverables

Vision

Phase

Strategy

Phase

Design

Phase

Business

Case Phase

Plan

Phase

Phases 

 Primary Deliverables

Business Problem Assessment

Target Business Vision

Transformation Strategy

Target Business Design

Transformation Business Case

Transformation Master Plan

Alignment Assessments

BTEP Phases & Deliverables

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Existing projects

New projects

sample case study

Sample Case Study

Seniors Service Mapping Initiative

project overview objectives
Project Overview – Objectives
  • Define a common shared vision for seniors
  • Define a senior’s problem statement
  • Find 2 to3 transformation opportunities across the jurisdictions to support the improvement of services to seniors
  • Set a foundation for describing seniors programs and services across three jurisdictions
    • Niagara had both regional and local municipal representation
  • Apply and test BTEP methodology and provide feedback
seniors project team
Seniors Project Team

Participants

Federal Government

Veterans Affairs Canada

Joanne Harrington

True Taylor

Myron Kramar

Health Canada

Francine Sicotte

Cathy Bennett

Social Development Canada

Stephane Belanger

Bob Rees

Melanie Rebane

Scott Wallace

Canada Revenue Agency

Mike Hamelin-CRA

Treasury Board Secretariat

Kirk Labelle

Region of Niagara

Community Services

Jane Beamer

Maureen Shantz

Province of Ontario

Ontario Seniors Secretariat

Diane Varga

Anne Marie Radford

Ministry of Consumer and Business Services

Karin Fischer

Ann Gabriel

Sponsors

Region of Niagara

Dominic Ventresca

Province Ontario

Ann Gabriel

Federal Government

Pamela Miller – TBS

Joanne Harrington -VAC

putting next steps in btep context

Expand Scope (all business types; ongoing businesses),

Participation (e.g., CRA, other provinces), Level of Definition

Phases 

Vision

Phase

Strategy

Phase

Design

Phase

Business

Case Phase

Plan

Phase

 Primary Deliverables

Business Problem Assessment

Target Business Vision

Transformation Strategy

Target Business Design

Transformation Business Case

Transformation Master Plan

Alignment Assessments

StNB and Seniors projects to date

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Alignment

Testing

Existing projects

Opportunities = early spin-off projects

New projects

Putting Next Steps in BTEP Context
the vision phase
The Vision Phase

Vision Phase

Strategy Phase

Design Phase

Business Case Phase

Planning Phase

Produce first iteration of

Primary Deliverables

Business Problem Assessment

Work Products

Target Business Vision

Work products are associated

with one or more

primary deliverables

Supported

by

Transformation Strategy

Target Business Design

Transformation Business Case

slide29

Target Group Needs

SENIOR

TARGET GROUP

  • The participants focused on three principal target groups:
    • Seniors
    • Informal Care Givers
    • General Public

Acknowledgement

Shelter

Food / Nourishment

Income

Health

SENIOR’S NEEDS

Safety

Seniors’ needs set the context for alignment of services to program outcomes

Socialization

Respect

Education

Meaningful Activity / Recreation

Independence

governments of canada top model mapping
Columns - Types of services, Rows – Types of needs (M= Municipality, R=Regional, P=Provincial, F=Federal)Governments of Canada Top Model Mapping

Standard framework for classifying government activities in terms of outputs (what) and needs (why); Indicates opportunities for multi-jurisdictional collaboration

program service alignment model psam matrix
This model tells us:

The scope of the transformation initiative wrt needs and services

If there are any unmet needs

If there are dependencies between periods of permission

For many outputs of the same type (same colour),

Can any be consolidated within/across jurisdictions?

Are multiple jurisdictions providing similar service outputs? (leads to opportunity for inter-jurisdictional collaboration)

Program Service Alignment Model (PSAM) - matrix
project approach summary
Seniors

Limited scope at the start -

Senior states (covered 5 states, there may be others

Participation (e.g., 4 federal departments, and 2 ministries from Ontario )

Project Approach Summary
  • Must be run as a project (e.g., Project Sponsor, Project Manager, Project Charter, Collaboration Plan)
  • Project Sponsor ( Seniors – VAC) was responsible for selecting Federal and provincial departments. The province selected regional and municipal participation.
  • Participants were chosen for their breadth of knowledge of services in the area
  • Three workshops (6.5 days total) run over 3-4 months; Significant time and effort expended prior to and between workshops
root cause analysis
Root Cause Analysis

Provides context to “get at root of underlying problems / symptoms”

senior s problem statement
Senior’s Problem Statement

Health problem example

identify range of services

Is there an opportunity here?

Common

Case Mgt?

Identify Range of Services

Seniors Program and Service Alignment Model

MUNICIPAL SERVICES

FEDERAL SERVICES

REGIONAL SERVICES

PROVINCIAL SERVICES

target group state transition model senior s state s and transitions
The project focused on 5 “Undesirable” States:

Sick, Inadequately housed, Abused, Isolated and Financially Insecure.

Various services are needed at different times to help the senior move to preferred states and to inhibit the senior from moving to less desired states

A senior could be in one or more of these states at any one time

Target Group State Transition ModelSenior’s state’s and transitions
program and service alignment model

SENIOR

Acknowledgement

Shelter

Food / Nourishment

Adult / Senior

Rental Subsidy

Income

Rent Subsidy

Health

Safety

Socialization

Respect

Education

LEGEND

Meaningful Activity / Recreation

Independence

Program and Service Alignment Model

Explicitly identifies all programs & services directly satisfying one target group’s needs

Identifies opportunities for service improvement e.g. where similar services meet similar needs

Supports shelter options

Provides

income

Supports financial viability of living independently

Note: Distributed PSAM matrix shows all public facing services versus needs

putting services in order

Why is the

Recovery bundle

bigger than the

Prevention bundle?

Can we refocus our services from Recovery to Prevention?

Putting Services in Order

Outputs that prevent or detect a senior becoming Financially Insecure

Prevention

Recovery

Seniors Transition Output Bundle

transition output bundles
Transition Output Bundles
  • This model tells us:
    • How many services are required to move between states
    • How to prioritize looking for solutions.
      • Are any problems associated with a bundle?
      • Are some bundles more important than others?
    • Whether we can eliminate the major steps
    • If there are any dependencies
    • Whether the services ‘bundled’ together ‘belong’ together
    • Where there are many services of the same output type
      • Can any be consolidated? Eliminated? Moved to another transition? Is there an opportunity for identifying a common process e.g., common application initiation process, common forms?
transition output bundle
Define “bundles” by identifying services that detect, help, or prevent transitions

Sets context for co-ordination of efforts and aligning performance across providers

Shows services by type or jurisdiction that must “fit together” to make a difference for the target group

Identifies opportunities for common or standardized processes to “join up” services in the bundle

Transition Output Bundle
vision template
Vision Template

Organizes key vision information

three transformation opportunities
Three Transformation Opportunities
  • Client Record for Seniors Programs and Services
  • Common Mail out for Seniors
  • Collaborative Case Management
slide44

SIAM Example Common Mail-Out

  • In this example, a service provider has an agreement to provide a common mail out on behalf of a number of seniors service providers
  • The common mail out service provider in turn has an agreement to ensure that the required information and channels are in place to support the common mail out
  • Each line represents a required agreement!

Who will be accountable to provide common mail out provider with required information?

Which service providers will require a common mail out?

Who will be accountable for common mail out service?

Legend

Who will be accountable for providing channel services?

service process pattern analysis
Service Process Pattern Analysis
  • Is therean opportunity to pull out common processes into a common provider service (i.e., outsourcing or in-sourcing)?
  • Is there an opportunity for new policy standards and best practices?
slide48

Participant Feedback

  • 100% of participants from the 4 jurisdictions felt:
    • Workshop objectives were met
    • Workshop process was effective
  • Participant comments – things found most useful:
    • “ability to debate, test ideas”
    • “problem statement”
    • “evaluation, alignment and ranking of opportunities
    • “State transition output bundles and SIAM”
    • “program logic model”
    • “implementation strategies”
    • “brainstorming”
summary
Summary
  • If we want to deliver these outcomes across government, we need a transformation process that works across government jurisdictions and programs.
  • The Business Transformation Enablement Program (BTEP) will help us do that - by providing strategies, methods, models and framework as common design and alignment tools.
  • Using Service Vision for Canadians principles to demonstrate how a service strategy geared to seniors can bring about transformation in programs, policy and service delivery channels.
your presenters
Your Presenters
  • Joanne Harrington, Director, Seniors Cluster, Veterans Affairs Canada

joanne.harrington@vac-acc.gc.ca (613) 996-2470

  • Mike Giovinazzo, President

We4C Solutions

Mike@Giovinazzo.ca

(613) 863-9342