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Cultural Competent Self-Determination: Promoting ALL Students’ Involvement in the IEP Transition Process. 2008 New Mexico Summer Institute Juan Portley University of Oklahoma. Traditional View. Self-determination experiences in school comprise largely of solitary opportunities.

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Cultural Competent Self-Determination: Promoting ALL Students’ Involvement in the IEP Transition Process

2008 New Mexico Summer Institute

Juan Portley

University of Oklahoma

traditional view
Traditional View
  • Self-determination experiences in school comprise largely of solitary opportunities.
    • IEP meetings/Planning process
  • Student-led IEPs
    • Teach several lessons on how to lead IEPs
  • Does this model fit everyone?
  • How do you change it to fit your students?
purpose for student involvement
Purpose for Student Involvement?
  • Students exercising their rights for self-determination as young adults.
  • Critical Questions:
    • How does your school reflect or provide opportunities for self-determination?
critical questions to consider
Critical Questions to Consider
  • Do conventional self-determination components fit for students and families from diverse backgrounds?
  • What are the differences you see in your school?
  • How do you assess these differences?
  • What factors are considered in making this delineation?
planning components
Planning Components
  • Where we are now and where we need to go?
    • Assessments, Assessments, and Assessments…
  • Not one time shots
  • On-going and across many settings
    • Vocational Interest
    • Self-Determination
    • Adaptive Behavior
how does traditional fit in your school
How Does Traditional Fit in Your School?
  • IDEA states schools must prepare students for postsecondary setting?
  • How is this achieved in your school?
  • How is difference viewed?
  • Does that view of difference change your practices from students and families of different backgrounds?
school or program vision
School or Program Vision?
  • Does your vision drive your practice?
  • What priority does student participation receive in your school?
  • What expectations does your school or staff have for students with disabilities from different backgrounds?
multicultural consideration
Multicultural Consideration
  • Home/Community Setting
  • Socio-economic Status
  • Ethnicity
  • Language
  • Social Structure
home or community
Home or Community
  • Family considerations
    • Postsecondary expectations
    • Modes of communication
    • Family structure
    • Family resources
    • Language differences
  • How does your staff address these with regards to self-determination or IEP participation?
ethnicity
Ethnicity
  • How might this effect expectations of the family and/or school staff?
  • How does your staff find out these expectations
  • How does this change the IEP process?
  • Do students have to lead the IEP to attain meaningful involvement?
traditional modes of communication
Traditional Modes of Communication
  • Calls, letters sent home, parent night, and emails
  • More Effective ways to communicate:
    • Community Involvement
    • Familiarize yourself with family away from school
    • Engage in community activities
    • Informal talks away from the classroom
understand community history
Understand Community History
  • Assess for educational history
    • Many minority families have unique histories with the educational process.
    • Gain an understanding for their social perspective on how education is viewed.
    • The drive for research based answers has replaced creative thinking to resolve complex issues.
difficult discussions
Difficult Discussions
  • What works is not always decided upon consensus.
  • Does your staff hold discussions regarding perceptions, methods, and interpretations of the impact of culture on student learning?
  • Understanding students’ culture exists as the most important prerequisite for choosing effective instruction.
  • Where is the time for planning?
parental expectations
Parental Expectations
  • Minority parents want their children to be successful and attain self-sufficiency(Geenen et al., 2002).
  • Desire more active role in the decision making process(Blue-Banning et al., 2002).
teacher expectations
Teacher Expectations
  • Graduate high school
  • Be a productive member of society
  • Want them to attend college, but hold little hope of them finishing.
  • “Leave the Rez”

Portley (in process)

family findings
Family Findings
  • Desire a sense of normalcy
  • Need for personnel who listen
  • Parents wanted respect
  • Opportunity to build trust
  • Felt blamed
  • Empathize with individual circumstances

Defur et al. (2002)

five sub themes what makes a difference
Five Sub-themes: What Makes a Difference
  • Communication: Listen/Learn
  • Collaboration: Invite open environment
  • Connection: Equity
  • Caring: Empathy
  • Celebration: Expression/Expectations

Defur et al. (2002)

student centered planning
Student Centered Planning
  • Communicate with all parties
  • Assessments (self-awareness)
  • Exposure and experience
  • Goal-setting (gain all party inputs)
  • Carry out the plan
    • Resource management
    • Collaborate
program structure
Program Structure
  • Scheduling changes to fit family needs, interpreters, transportation, informal trainings
  • Build in a way to determine what self-determination and future goalsexistfor your community because it’s about their definition of value, not the school’s.
current tools
Current Tools
  • Student-Directed Transition Planning
      • http://education.ou.edu/zarrow
  • AIR Self-determination assessment
  • ARC Assessment
  • Casey Life-skills
    • www.caseylifeskills.org
questions
Questions?

Contact:

Juan Portley, M.Ed

Email: juanportley@ou.edu