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Enrollment Update | Fall 2009. Founded 1870 | Rolla, Missouri. Total Enrollment Fall 2000-Fall 2009 47% Enrollment Growth: 2,189 Additional Students. Increase enrollment and manage the academic portfolio: .

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slide1

Enrollment Update | Fall 2009

Founded 1870 | Rolla, Missouri

increase enrollment and manage the academic portfolio
Increase enrollment and manage the academic portfolio:
  • Missouri S&T will increase its enrollment by improving access, expanding diversity, increasing retention, expanding extended learning activities, controlling tuition, and providing more endowed scholarships.
  • Missouri S&T will balance the academic portfolio and the student experience by increasing market share in areas such as life sciences and biotechnology, energy, business and management, communication, the liberal arts, and education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
strategic enrollment management plan 2007 2011
Strategic Enrollment Management Plan 2007-2011

Increase Success of Students

  • Retention Rates
  • Graduation Rates

Increase College Going Rate & Access

  • Access & Affordability
  • Pipeline of College Ready Students
  • Strategic Partnerships
  • Outreach/Education
  • Scholarships

Expanding Current Markets & Capturing New Markets

  • Out-of-state students
  • Transfer Students
  • Female Students
  • Underrepresented Minority Students
  • International Students
  • Graduate Students
  • Nontraditional Students
2001 2009 enrollment change
2001-2009 Enrollment Change
  • 41% Increase in Undergraduates (1507)
  • 41% Increase in Female Students (+435)
  • 73% Increase in Graduate Students (+682)
  • 91% Increase in Minority Students (+342)
  • 40% Increase in Non-Engineering Majors
  • Since 2005, 60% of Growth due to Increased Retention Rates
  • 87% to 88% Retention Rate Achieved and Sustained
  • 62% Graduation Rate Achieved. 65% possible by 2010
  • Lower discount rate from +38% to 27%
  • Generated over $21 M in additional gross revenues
an ideal missouri s t freshman class
An IDEAL Missouri S&T freshman class

990 to 1030 students with the following profile:

Academic Preparedness:

27 average ACT score (upper 10% in nation)

90% having completed the full Missouri college-prep curriculum

50% from the upper 20% of high school class

Geography: 70% in-state 25% out-of-state 5% international

Gender: 30% female 70% male

Ethnicity:13% under-represented minority students

Majors: 70% Engineering (all programs)

5% Liberal Arts (psychology, history, English, technical communication, philosophy)

8% Business, Information Technology and Economics

9% Natural Sciences and Mathematics (biology, chemistry, physics)

8% Computer Science

Success Rate:90% first to second year retention rate

80% return for third year

65-70% graduate in six years

s t miners aren t your average joe
S&T Miners Aren’t Your “Average Joe”
  • 52 National Merit Scholars
  • 80% ranked in the top 30% of their high school class
  • 71 Valedictorians & Salutatorians
  • Average ACT of 27.7 (upper 10% in nation)
  • +70% have over 13 hours college credit
  • 895 Bright Flight Scholars*
  • 1,426 Access Missouri Scholars*
  • Mid-range ACT score of 26-31*

*All students

silver bullet
silver bullet

or

strike of lightening?

the truth is
the truth is……….

silver buckshot:

+92 strategic institutional, policy, market, facility and program changes.

what is sem
What is SEM?

Strategic Enrollment Management (SEM) is defined as “a comprehensive process designed to help an institution achieve and maintain the optimum recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of students where ‘optimum’ is designed within the academic context of the institution. As such, SEM is an institution-wide process that embraces virtually every aspect of an institution’s function and culture.”

Michael Dolence, AACRAO SEM 2001

  • Research
  • Recruitment
  • Retention
core enrollment principles
Core Enrollment Principles
  • No Enrollment Effort is Successful without QUALITY Academic Programs to Promote
  • Recruitment and Retention is an On-going, Multi-year PROCESS with Strong Access to Research and DATA
  • +80% of Enrollments come from REGIONAL student markets for BS/BA degrees
  • The Most Successful Recruitment Programs Clearly DIFFERENTIATE the Student Experience from Competitor’s Programs
  • The Most Successful Retention Programs Clearly Address Students’ Needs and Regularly ENGAGE Students in Academic and Non-Academic Programs
slide14

Pricing

Institutional Research

Strategic Planning

Admission & Recruitment

Academic Policies

Housing

Alumni and Development

Teaching & Learning

Mental Health Services

Campus Life

Social Support Programs

Assessment of

Student Learning

Student Success

Academic Support Programs

Career Planning

Institutional Policies

External Engagement

Marketing

Institutional Effectiveness

Records and Registration

Financial Aid

Budgeting

Academic Programs

Chart Adapted from: Bob Wilkinson

sem strategies
Stabilizing Enrollments

Reducing Vulnerabilities

Aligning EM with Academic Programs

Stabilize Finances

Optimize Resources

Evaluate Strategies and Tactics

Improve Services

Improve Quality

Improve Access to Information

SEM Strategies
total enrollment fall 2000 fall 2009
Total Enrollment Fall 2000-Fall 2009

47% Total Enrollment Growth: 2000: 4,626 2009: 6,815

41% Undergraduate Growth: 1,507 Additional Students

73% Graduate Growth: 682 Additional Students

campus and distance online enrollments fall 2000 fall 2009
Campus and Distance/Online Enrollments Fall 2000-Fall 2009

40% Growth of Campus Enrollment: 1761 Additional Students

184% Growth of Distance Enrollment: 428 Additional Students

20 000 fewer potential engineering majors
20,000 fewer potential engineering majors

College Bound ACT Tested Students Interested in Any Engineering Field

> 5%

SOURCE: ACT EIS 2008

missouri s 2008 student funnel for all engineering fields
Missouri’s 2008 student funnel for ALL engineering fields
  • High School Seniors: 72,467
  • High School Graduates: 61,752
  • ACT Testers/College Bound: 47,240
  • Any Engineering Interest (all testers): 1,768
  • Any Engineering Interest, (+21 testers): 1,256

(21 = MO average score / 50%)

  • Engineering Interest, +24 comp. score: 961

(24 = UM minimum for auto admission)

  • Missouri S&T Freshmen Engineering 681

Enrollees:

71% S&T market share

SOURCES: MODESE 2009, ACT EIS 2008, PeopleSoft

growth by academic groupings fall 2000 fall 2009
Growth by Academic GroupingsFall 2000 – Fall 2009
  • Engineering =
  • AERO
  • ARCH
  • CERAMIC
  • CHEMICAL
  • CIVIL
  • COMPUTER
  • ENG MECH
  • ENG MGMT
  • ELECTRICAL
  • ENVIRNMTL
  • FRESHMAN
  • GEOLOGICAL
  • GEOTECH
  • IDE
  • MATERIALS
  • METALLURGY
  • MINING
  • NUCLEAR
  • PETROLEUM
  • SYSTEMS

60% INCREASE

growth by academic groupings fall 2000 fall 20091
Growth by Academic GroupingsFall 2000 – Fall 2009
  • Business & Computing =
  • MBA
  • BUS&MS
  • COMP SCI
  • IST
  • Math & Natural Sciences =
  • BIOLOGY
  • CHEMISTRY
  • GEOLOGY
  • MATH
  • PHYSICS

51% INCREASE

42% INCREASE

growth by academic groupings fall 2000 fall 20092
Growth by Academic GroupingsFall 2000 – Fall 2009
  • Liberal Arts =
  • ENGLISH
  • HISTORY
  • TECH COMM
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • SocialSciences =
  • ECONOMICS
  • PSYCHOLOGY

52% INCREASE

5% DECREASE

growth by academic groupings graduate only fall 2000 fall 2009
Growth by Academic GroupingsGRADUATE ONLY Fall 2000 – Fall 2009
  • Engineering =
  • AERO
  • ARCH
  • CERAMIC
  • CHEMICAL
  • CIVIL
  • COMPUTER
  • ENG MECH
  • ENG MGMT
  • ELECTRICAL
  • ENVIRNMTL
  • FRESHMAN
  • GEOLOGICAL
  • GEOTECH
  • IDE
  • MATERIALS
  • METALLURGY
  • MINING
  • NUCLEAR
  • PETROLEUM
  • SYSTEMS

TOTAL ENGINEERING: 97% INCREASE

18% INCREASE

713% INCREASE

s t s global presence
S&T’s Global Presence

Blue = S&T Alumni

Green = Current Students

Red =  MOA universities

students home states
Students’ Home States

Fall 2009

+25 students

10-24 students

1-9 students

48

2

2

1

6

2

2

23

3

2

14

15

21

3

2

16

RI

6

32

22

38

5

30

13

5

441

3

26

28

4

2

DC

48

4,673

126

19

15

13

14

19

51

64

4

7

Total Enrollment

  • 49 states & 51 nations
  • 73% Missouri residents
  • 11% minority students
  • 12% international students

7

22

22

128

10

6

17

2

change in enrollments fall 2006 fall 2009
% Change in EnrollmentsFall 2006 - Fall 2009

4.3

100

71.4

0

50

33

33

15.0

25

60

40

36.4

90.9

50

80

0

RI

39.1

46.7

11.6

20

150

87.5

85.7

150

15.7

200

52.9

64.7

0

2

DC

14.3

25.4

1.6

26.7

36.4

25% or greater

10% – 24.9%

5% – 9.9%

4.9% – -4.9%

-5.1% – -9.9%

-10% – -24.9%

-25% or greater

333

22.2

46.2

10.5

5.9

100

40

0

15.8

120

29.3

16.7

100

41.7

100

students home counties

SCHUY-

LER

LIVING-

STON

MONT-

GOMERY

ST

CHARLES

ST

LOUIS

ST

GAS-

LOUIS

CITY

CON-

ADE

JEFFER-

SON

WASHING-

STE

TON

GENEVIEVE

CAPE

GIRARDEAU

BOLLIN-

GER

MISSIS-

SIPPI

NEW

MADRID

PEMI-

SCOT

Students’ Home Counties

SCOT-LAND

PUTNAM

WORTH

MERCER

1

1

3

CLARK

1

ATCHISON

0

4

HARRISON

NODAWAY

0

GENTRY

2

8

SULLIVAN

ADAIR

KNOX

LEWIS

12

GRUNDY

4

3

4

7

+50 students

30-49 students

10-29 students

1-9 students

0 students

HOLT

2

1

DAVIESS

ANDREW

DE KALB

LINN

MACON

6

8

MARION

3

SHELBY

6

11

23

8

4

23

CALDWELL

CLINTON

2

RALLS

BUCHANAN

7

CHARITON

9

MONROE

CARROLL

RANDOLPH

1

PIKE

3

8

RAY

1

PLATTE

13

CLAY

13

70

AUDRAIN

110

11

HOWARD

SALINE

LINCOLN

8

BOONE

LAFAYETTE

50

5

16

JACKSON

74

295

COOPER

CALLAWAY

15

7

WARREN

34

35

470

JOHNSON

PETTIS

24

1,119

23

MONITEAU

CASS

122

50

6

COLE

OSAGE

81

FRANKLIN

HENRY

17

MORGAN

20

9

153

6

BENTON

200

BATES

MARIES

MILLER

7

21

7

23

CAMDEN

ST. CLAIR

CRAWFORD

37

41

5

PHELPS

HICKORY

35

16

VERNON

323

2

PULASKI

24

PERRY

11

170

ST FRANCOIS

11

CEDAR

IRON

DALLAS

6

DENT

LACLEDE

38

POLK

11

23

6

MADISON

BARTON

16

14

3

REYNOLDS

4

DADE

80

3

TEXAS

WRIGHT

WEBSTER

7

GREENE

26

JASPER

18

7

158

46

SHANNON

WAYNE

SCOTT

2

9

LAWRENCE

8

CARTER

14

DOUGLAS

CHRISTIAN

NEWTON

STODDARD

5

3

19

48

14

3

BUTLER

HOWELL

RIPLEY

STONE

15

OREGON

OZARK

23

BARRY

10

4

MCDONALD

TANEY

2

11

9

6

19

4

Fall 2009

10

4

DUNKLIN

change in enrollments fall 2005 fall 2009

SCHUY-

LER

LIVING-

STON

MONT-

GOMERY

ST

CHARLES

ST

LOUIS

ST

GAS-

LOUIS

CITY

CON-

ADE

JEFFER-

SON

WASHING-

STE

TON

GENEVIEVE

CAPE

GIRARDEAU

BOLLIN-

GER

MISSIS-

SIPPI

NEW

MADRID

PEMI-

SCOT

% Change in EnrollmentsFall 2005 - Fall 2009

SCOT-LAND

PUTNAM

WORTH

MERCER

50

0

25

CLARK

66.7

ATCHISON

100

300

HARRISON

NODAWAY

0

GENTRY

100

0

SULLIVAN

ADAIR

KNOX

LEWIS

10.1

GRUNDY

100

200

133.3

0

25% or greater

10% – 24.9%

5% – 9.9%

4.9% – -4.9%

-5.1% – -9.9%

-10% – -24.9%

-25% or greater

HOLT

33.3

66.7

DAVIESS

ANDREW

DE KALB

LINN

MACON

0

166

MARION

200

SHELBY

14.3

37.5

11.5

100

33.3

4.2

CALDWELL

CLINTON

100

RALLS

BUCHANAN

36.4

CHARITON

125

MONROE

CARROLL

RANDOLPH

75

PIKE

PLATTE

0

33.3

RAY

66.7

45.8

44.4

CLAY

44.4

AUDRAIN

46.7

26.7

HOWARD

SALINE

LINCOLN

33.3

BOONE

LAFAYETTE

31.6

16.6

6.7

JACKSON

23.3

29.6

COOPER

CALLAWAY

25

133

WARREN

100

29.6

36.2

JOHNSON

PETTIS

243

21.8

9.5

MONITEAU

CASS

171.1

35.1

33.3

COLE

OSAGE

3.6

FRANKLIN

HENRY

13.3

MORGAN

4.8

12.5

41.7

20

BENTON

14.9

BATES

MARIES

MILLER

600

4.5

133

17.9

CAMDEN

CRAW-FORD

2.4

ST. CLAIR

8.4

25

PHELPS

HICKORY

14.6

14.3

VERNON

3.2

0

PULASKI

100

PERRY

10

0.7

ST FRANCOIS

10

CEDAR

IRON

DALLAS

14.3

DENT

LACLEDE

4.2

POLK

22.2

4.5

25

MADISON

BARTON

23.1

62.5

180

REYNOLDS

66.7

DADE

33.3

0

TEXAS

WRIGHT

WEBSTER

75

GREENE

23.8

JASPER

28.6

133

17

6.1

SHANNON

WAYNE

SCOTT

50

55

LAWRENCE

33.3

CARTER

7.7

DOUGLAS

CHRISTIAN

NEWTON

STODDARD

28.6

57.1

18.8

2

55.6

50

BUTLER

HOWELL

RIPLEY

STONE

44.4

OREGON

OZARK

15

BARRY

42.9

33.3

MCDONALD

TANEY

60

8.3

35.7

0

111

300

9.1

0

DUNKLIN

46 the economy has changed which college students will attend
46%: The Economy Has Changed Which College Students will Attend

SOURCE: Longmire & Company, Inc. 2009 “Study of the Impact of the Economy on Enrollment”

slide42
76% indicated they would be “somewhat” or “very likely” to consider a more expensive institution if it could deliver greater value.

SOURCE: Longmire & Company, Inc. 2009 “Study of the Impact of the Economy on Enrollment”

key changes in the college bound student markets
Key changes in the college-bound student markets
  • The Midwest and Northeast will experience a 4% to 10% decline in high school graduates between 2009 – 2014 (WICHE)
  • The profile of college-bound students is rapidly becoming more ethnically diverse and female dominant (NCES, WICHE, ACT, College Board)
  • The number of students interested in engineering, computer science, and natural science degrees has declined to record lows (ACT, CIRP)
  • More full-time college freshmen are choosing to start at two-year colleges (IPED, MODHE)
  • More students are enrolling in more than one college at a time (National Student Clearinghouse)
  • Future student market growth will include more students requiring financial aid and loans to complete a degree (WICHE)
projected change in high school graduates 2007 2017
Projected change in high school graduates 2007-2017

+1

-17

-15

-23

-3

-19

+4

-14

-6

+13

-8

-8

-12

-14

-6

-6

-6

-12

-6

-3

-2

+53

-6

+10

-2

+9

-4

+27

-6

+21

-5

+1

+1

-3

+2

-31

+14

-1

+27

+1

+2

+1

-8

0

+22

0

> 20%

+11% to +20%

0% to +10%

Decreases

-7

+16

+10

-9

-14

Source: Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac 2006-07

change in missouri general population by county 2000 2008
% change in Missouri general population by county 2000-2008

Missouri

Average = 5.6%

-14.4% - -0.1%

0% - 4.9%

5% - 9.9%

10% - 19.9%

20% - 39%

Source: USDA, Bureau of the Census

Published by: University of Missouri Extension, April 2 2009

slide51

Fall 2005 Inquiries – Freshmen

Graphed by 3 Digit Zip Code

slide52

Fall 2009 Inquiries – Freshmen

Graphed by 3 Digit Zip Code

Red areas are metropolitan areas with largest inquiry growth

ncsssmst member schools
NCSSSMST Member Schools

National Consortium of Specialized Secondary Schools of Math, Science & Technology

interest from specialized math science high schools
Interest from Specialized Math/Science High Schools

Unofficial data from Hobsons EMT system

slide55
2008 Missouri College Bound, ACT Tested High School Seniors interested in Business and IST at Missouri S&T

ONLY SEND FACULTY TO BIG CIRCLES!!!

s t affordability
S&T Affordability
  • Current Undergraduate Students
    • Average parent income: $ 78,250
    • Family incomes below $50,000: +35%
    • First generation college students: 29%
    • Pell Grant eligible students: 22%
  • Graduation Statistics
    • Approximate indebtedness: $ 23,000
    • Average 2009 starting salary: $ 57,521
financial profile
Financial Profile
    • 34% first-generation college students
  • +80% are receiving scholarships & financial aid
  • 22% qualify for Low Income Pell Grants
  • 82% plan to work while enrolled at S&T
  • 29% have/carry a credit card

12 already have a monthly balance over $1000

cost of education
Cost of Education

Estimated 2009/2010

Based on 30 credit hours per academic year

MO Resident

$ 7,368

2,070

960

7,632

$ 18,030

Midwest Student

Exchange (IN,KS,MI,MN,NE,ND,WI)

$ 11,052

2,070

960

7,632

$21,714

Non-Resident

$ 18,459

2,070

960

7,632

$ 29,121

TuitionFeesBooks & SuppliesRoom & BoardTotal

  • Room and Board based upon average residential life cost for the campus population.
  • Budgets based upon 8 hours of supplemental fee courses.
13 375 increase in fafsa submissions over ay09 25 641 increase in fafas submissions over ay07
13% (+375) increase in FAFSA submissions over AY0925% (+641) increase in FAFAS submissions over AY07
pre college summer programs grades 1 12
Pre-College & Summer ProgramsGrades 1-12

26% of 2009 Freshman Class attended at least one S&T Summer Camp

Learn Moresummer.mst.edu

highest yielding enrollment activities
Highest Yielding Enrollment Activities
  • Campus Visit/Summer Camps
    • Over 70% of the students who visit campus or attend a camp apply. 
    • About 61% of these applicants enroll, so about 42% of our high school level camp attendees end up enrolling. 
    • 2009’s freshmen report that around 26% of the students attending at least one summer program
  • Tele-counseling
    • Increases students attendance at HS/CC visit, receptions & campus visitation
  • Regular Communication/Relationship Development
    • Current communication plans provide contacts every 2 to 4 weeks from the end of the Junior Year to the April of Senior Year
      • General Plan: 14 to 18 contacts/communications
      • Minority or Women: 21 to 27 contacts/communications
      • Minority Women: 28 to 36 contact/communications
miners fall 2009 stats breaking national trends
Miners’ Fall 2009 StatsBreaking National Trends
  • 58% already considering graduate school
  • 79% chose Missouri S&T as their 1st choice institution
  • 58% were high school varsity athletes
  • 94% plan to join a student organization
  • 68% plan to join a student design team
  • 44% would like to study abroad
  • 26% plan to be involved in music and theatre
  • 67% plan to complete a BS in 4 years or less
focus our future plans on optimizing the s t s operational capacity
Focus Our Future Plans on Optimizing the S&T’s Operational Capacity
  • What is the total faculty’s teaching load?
  • How many classrooms and seats does the campus have available?
  • How many science/engineering labs are available?
  • How many residence hall beds are available for paying students?
  • How many parking spaces are reserved for students?
  • What is the per meal dining capacity?
upcoming challenges
Upcoming Challenges

If we maintain current record market shares, we could decline 2% to 5% in new students each year after 2010.

If we continue to increase research, we will need more graduate students and better GA packages.

To maintain or grow quality, diversity and revenue levels the quantity of students will be key.

key issues to address
Key Issues to Address
  • Managing of the “tipping” US student markets
  • Lack of Appropriate Classroom Space
  • Need to Centralize Students Services
  • Need of Diversity of Student Housing Options
  • “One Card” service and security option with Campus IDs
  • Increasing Family Participation
  • Need for more unrestricted and need-based scholarships
slide74

Enrollment Update | Fall 2009

Founded 1870 | Rolla, Missouri