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 starter activity - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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 starter activity
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  1. starter activity During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries the goverment rased taxes to pay for its foriegn wars, especially those against Napoleon and France. These import duties were unpopular because they raised the price of many desireable goods. They were also very hard to inforce. With several thousand miles of ungaurded coastline around britain it was fairly easy to smuggle goods in, and there was a ready market among people who didn’t see why they should pay higher prices. Indeed, like poching there were many who did not see smuggling as a crime at all. A smuggler could earn six or seven times a farm labourers daily wage in a night. Those who helped smugglers carry goods to the shore could expect to earn twice a labourer’s wage. Not all smugglers were laborers – robert walpole, later Prime Minister, smuggled wine into the country while he was a government minister using a government ship. Many thousands of people were envolved in smuggling. Under the Bloody Code, the government made smuggling a capitol offence. government raised foreign desirable enforce Britain unguarded poaching labourer’s labourers Robert Walpole involved capital There are marks for SPAG in the new GCSE. Help Mr Higgins find the SPAG mistakes in his notes on the causes of smuggling. What’s the link between smuggling and the Napoleonic Wars?

  2. Key words: contraband customs & excise clandestine “Watch the wall, my darling, whilethe gentlemen go by!”  Learning objectives TBAT explain why smuggling was so popular & assess the impact on Dover Castle

  3.  Your task • Study the sources and note down reasons why smuggling would have been such a problem in coastal towns such as Dover. • What evidence is there that smuggling was linked to the Napoleonic Wars?

  4. Smuggling Fear – smugglers knew communities & heavily armed Consumerism – demand for luxury, expensive goods Tradition – popular since Middle Ages; folklore popularised their actions Proximity – close to Continent, so easy Napoleonic Wars – unemployed turned to smuggling Encouraged by French – acted as spies

  5. Members of the ‘Coast Blockade’ fight it put with local smugglers Read the extract from the Dover Castle guidebook and highlight any evidence you find of changes at Dover to the respond to the threat of smuggling.  Would you say there is more or less evidence of smuggling at Dover than there is of the Napoleonic Wars? Why?

  6. From: Coast Blockade, Dover Castle To: Felicity Blossom Pontefract Yorks It’s 1828. Write a Time Traveller’s postcard to a loved one. Describe the following: the reasons why smuggling is so popular locally, what has been done to stop the problem at Dover, references to the Aldington gang.  Describe your new accommodation at the bottom of the Castle and why you have moved there.

  7. Success Criteria 

  8.  Homework • Find 3 useful sites on smuggling and in a sentence explain what can be learned from them. • Can you find out what this item is?

  9. Key words: contraband customs & excise clandestine “Watch the wall, my darling, whilethe gentlemen go by!”  Learning objectives TBAT explain why smuggling was so popular & assess the impact on Dover Castle