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Natural Science Division Seminar Series God Plays Dice Quantum Principles Illustrated. Frank Rioux Department of Chemistry February 6, 2006. Introductory Remarks. Einstein contributed to the early development of quantum mechanics (QM).

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Natural science division seminar series god plays dice quantum principles illustrated

Natural Science Division Seminar SeriesGod Plays DiceQuantum Principles Illustrated

Frank Rioux

Department of Chemistry

February 6, 2006


Introductory remarks
Introductory Remarks

  • Einstein contributed to the early development of quantum mechanics (QM).

  • However, as the discipline matured and its meaning became clear, he (along with de Broglie and Schrödinger) became an ardent and vociferous critic of QM.

  • His critiques generally involved clever thought experiments design to reveal in a dramatic way what he considered to be QM’s most bizarre and unacceptable consequences.

  • Beginning in the 1970s it became feasible to carry out versions of his most famous thought experiment (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox) and the strange predictions of QM were confirmed experimentally.

  • While Einstein’s objections to QM have not withstood experimental scrutiny, it is clear today that his criticism has strengthened and clarified QM, and stimulated a tremendous amount of research in the field of quantum optics.


Einstein on quantum mechanics

Raffiniert ist der Herrgott, aber boshaft ist er nicht.

It seems hard to look at God's cards. But I cannot for a moment believe that he plays dice and makes use of 'telepathic' means as the current quantum theory alleges He does.

Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the 'old one.' I, at any rate, am convinced that He is not playing at dice.

Bohr to Einstein: “Einstein, stop telling God what to do!”

I cannot believe in the (quantum) theory because it cannot be reconciled with the idea that physics should represent a reality in time and space, free from spooky actions at a distance.

I still believe in the possibility of a model of reality, that is to say, of a theory, which represents things themselves and not merely the probability of their occurrence.

Einstein on Quantum Mechanics


Natural science division seminar series god plays dice quantum principles illustrated

Frank,

  • Turn off the computer projector now and do the three-polarizer demonstration.

  • You’ll need the overhead projector for the demo.

  • Did you check to make sure it has a good bulb?

  • When you’re finished with the demo turn the overhead projector off and the computer projector back on.


Natural science division seminar series god plays dice quantum principles illustrated

2. The probability that the vertically polarized photons will pass a second polarizer that is oriented horizontally is 0.

For all other experiments involving two polarizers only the probability of the outcome can be predicted, and this is cos2(θ), where θ is the relative angle of the polarizing films.


Spooky action at a distance
Spooky Action at a Distance subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

+-----------+ +-----------+

| 2 | | 2 |

| 1 3 | / \ | 1 * 3 |

Y<--| * |/ \| | |-->Y

__ / | \ |<--------- Ca* --------->| | | \__

| \ | \ |\ /| | | / |

| N<--| \ | \ / | | |-->N |

| | \ | | | | |

| | o | | o | |

| +-----------+ +-----------+ |

| + - - - - - - + |

+ - - - - - - - - - - - - -| Coincidence |- - - - - - - - - - - - -+

| Counter |

+ - - - - - - +


Experimental results
Experimental Results subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • Case 1. In runs for which the polarizing films are oriented at the same angle (11, 22, 33) the photons behave the same: they both either pass through the polarizers or they are both stopped by the polarizers.

  • Case 2. In runs for which the polarizing films are oriented at different angles (12, 21, 23, 32, 13, 31) the photons behave in the same way only 25% of the time. Conversely they behave differently 75% of the time.

  • Overall. Because in 1/3 of the runs the photons behave the same and in 2/3 of the runs they behave the same way only 25% of the time, in a large number of runs it is found that the photons behave the same way 50% of the time.


Local realistic prediction
Local Realistic Prediction subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • Realism – an experimental result is determined by a physical property of the system under study whose existence is independent of the experiment or experimenter.

  • The belief that photons carry information on their polarization along the three orientations of the films would yield the results shown in the table. There are eight photon states and nine film orientations. Thus there are 72 types of encounters between the photons and the polarizing films as recorded by the detectors and the coincidence counter.

  • The realist position (the one adopted by Einstein, for example) demands that the photons behave the same way 67% of the time (48/72), as is shown in the table. This is clearly not in agreement with the experimental result that overall the photons behave the same way only 50% of the time.

  • Note that the realist position is in agreement with Case 1 results, but in serious disagreement with Case 2 results. For Case 2 it predicts that 50% of the time the behavior of the photons is the same, when the experimental result is that the photons behave the same only 25% of the time.


Einstein local realism
Einstein: Local Realism subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.


Quantum mechanical interpretation
Quantum Mechanical Interpretation subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • For Case 1 results, the fact that the photons behave in the same way when the detector settings are the same (11, 22, 33) indicates that the photons have the same polarization and, therefore, the same wave function. They are in the same state. This is basically the same as the classical interpretation.

  • In Case 2 the polarizers are oriented at a 60o relative angle (12, 21, 23, 32, 13, 31). With these film orientations it is easy to show (see next slide) that the photons behave differently 75% of the time. This of course means that they behave the same way 25% of the time. This is in agreement with the Case 2 experimental results described earlier.

  • This means that the quantum interpretation is in agreement with the overall result that the photons behave the same way 50% of the time. The films have the same setting 1/3 of time and different settings 2/3 of the time.

  • When the films are set the same the photons behave the same way 100% of the time. When the film settings are different the photons behave the same way only 25% of the time [(1/3) 100% + (2/3) 25% = 50%].


Quantum explanation of case 2
Quantum Explanation of Case 2 subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • Photon A passes a vertical polarizer.

  • Therefore (here’s the spooky action at a distance)

  • The probability that B will pass a 60o polarizer is

  • When the polarizers are set to different angles, A and B behave the same way 25% of the time.


Final comments on quantum mechanics
Final Comments on Quantum Mechanics subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • A philosopher once said, ‘It is necessary for the very existence of science that the same conditions always produce the same results.’ Well, they don’t! [Richard Feynman]

  • I think it is safe to say that no one understands quantum mechanics. Do not keep saying to yourself, if you can possibly avoid it, 'But how can it possibly be like that?' because you will go down the drain into a blind alley from which nobody has yet escaped. Nobody knows how it can be like that. [Richard Feynman]

  • Any one who is not shocked by quantum mechanics has not fully understood it. [Niels Bohr]

  • The mathematical predictions of quantum mechanics yield results that are in agreement with experimental findings. That is the reason we use quantum theory. That quantum theory fits experiment is what validates the theory, but why experiment should give such peculiar results is a mystery. This is the shock to which Bohr referred. [Marvin Chester with slight modifications]

  • In the quantum world the present does not always have a unique past.


Feynman poetry
Feynman Poetry subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

We have always had a great deal of difficulty understanding the world view that quantum mechanics represents.

At least I do, because I’m an old enough man that I haven’t got to the point that this stuff is obvious to me.

Okay, I still get nervous with it …

You know how it always is, every new idea, it takes a generation or two until it becomes obvious that there’s no real problem.

I cannot define the real problem, therefore I suspect there’s no real problem, but I’m not sure there’s no real problem.


References
References subsequent experiments have certain outcomes according to quantum mechanics.

  • N. D. Mermin, "Spooky Actions at a Distance: Mysteries of the Quantum Theory," The Great Ideas of Today, Encyclopedia Britannica, Chicago, 1988, pp 2-53.

  • N. Herbert, Quantum Reality, Anchor Books, New York, 1985.

  • J. Baggott, The Meaning of Quantum Theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1992.

  • N. D. Mermin, "Bringing home the atomic world: Quantum mysteries for anybody," American Journal of Physics, 49, 940-943, (1981).

  • N. D. Mermin, "Is the moon there when nobody looks," Physics Today , 38(4), 38-47, (1985).

  • N. D. Mermin, "Quantum mysteries revisited," American Journal of Physics, 58, 731-734, (1990).

  • J. C. Polkinghorne, The Quantum World, Princeton Science Library, Pinceton, N.J.,1984.

  • A. I. M Rae, Quantum Mechanics, 3rd Ed., Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, UK, 1992.

  • G. Greenstein; A. G. Zajonc, The Quantum Challenge, Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, 1997.