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Building the Bridge: Making partnerships real between Aboriginal and mainstream services. Muriel Bamblett - CEO the Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency. Investing in the future – embedding culture and rights as best practice.

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building the bridge making partnerships real between aboriginal and mainstream services
Building the Bridge: Making partnerships real between Aboriginal and mainstream services

Muriel Bamblett - CEO

the Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency

investing in the future embedding culture and rights as best practice
Investing in the future – embedding culture and rights as best practice
  • a rights-based, culturally respectful strategy of social investment which acknowledges the impact of the past can form the basis of reviving local Aboriginal communities
  • embedding culture in our services and being holistic and strengths-based in our approach creates the best outcomes
  • partnerships not mainstreaming – to re-create local communities of care that empower Aboriginal peoples
towards cultural competence
Towards cultural competence
  • Recognise the importance of Aboriginal self-determination
  • Recognise that culture and connection to community is in the best interests of the Aboriginal people
  • Being a culturally safe organisation
  • Respect and understanding of culture
  • Understanding the impacts of our racist history
  • Addressing your ‘inner racist’
example of community level indicators and their relationship to a health outcome
EXAMPLE OF COMMUNITY-LEVEL INDICATORS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO A HEALTH OUTCOME –

An index of ‘‘cultural continuity’’ comprised of six marker variables: degree to which each of B.C.’s individual bands have already secured 1) some measure of self government; some control over the delivery of 2) health, 3) education, 4) policing services, and 5) cultural resources; and 6) are otherwise at work litigating for Aboriginal title to traditional lands.

Rate of youth suicide

Suicide rates by number of factors present in the community (1987–1992). (Taken from Chandler M and Proulx T. Changing selves in changing worlds: youth suicide on the fault lines of colliding cultures. Archives of Suicide Research 2006: 10: 125-140. 2006).

slide5

Cultural Competence Continuum

Cultural

Destructiveness

Cultural

Incapacity

Cultural

Pre competence

Cultural

Blindness

Cultural

Competence

Cultural

Proficiency

Towards cultural competence

Characterised by

Intentional attitudes

policies & practices

that are destructive

to cultures and

consequently to

individuals within the

Culture

Characterised by:

Lack of capacity to

help minority clients

or Communities due

to extremely biased

beliefs and a

paternal attitude

toward those

not of a mainstream

culture

Characterised by:

The belief that service

or helping approaches

traditionally used by

the dominant culture

are universally

applicable regardless

of race or culture.

These services ignore

cultural strengths and

encourage assimilation

Characterised by:

The desire to deliver

quality services

and a commitment

to diversity

indicated by hiring

minority staff,

initiating training and

recruiting minority

members for agency

leadership,

but lacking information

on how to maximise

these capacities.

This level of competence

can lead to tokenism

Characterised by:

Acceptance and

respect for difference

continuing self

assessment, careful

attention to the

dynamics of

difference, continuous

expansion of knowledge

and resources, and

adaptation of services to

better meet the needs of

diverse populations

Characterised by:

Holding culture in high

esteem: seeking to

add to the knowledge

base of culturally

competent practice

by conducting

research, influencing

approaches to care,

and improving

relations between

cultures

Promotes self

determination

slide6

Cultural Awareness – Knowledge with Understanding

  • Commitment to Aboriginal Self-determination and Respectful Partnerships– the Ground Rules
  • Cultural Respect - Attitude and Values
  • Cultural Responsiveness – Ability and Skills
  • Cultural Safety – Environment and Client Experience
rules of engagement an aboriginal client placement principle
Rules of engagement – an Aboriginal Client Placement principle
  • Aboriginal agencies first
  • Where the Aboriginal agency cannot deliver a service
    • Generalist agency who has a partnership agreement with an Aboriginal Agency
      • Therefore is committed to helping capacity build that agency
      • Therefore has Aboriginal workers who are appropriately mentored and supported
      • Therefore has undergone a cultural competency audit
balancing expectations
Balancing expectations
  • To have Aboriginal Services engaged in meaningful partnerships will require services to:
    • Acknowledge and accept the Aboriginal communities role to self determine and participate in all aspects of decision making
    • Show high levels of respect in all aspects of engagement
    • Be premised on equity and careful consideration
    • Acknowledge that Aboriginal Services do not enter into partnerships with the same finance and resource capacity
    • Undertake a community development approach to the partnership
building the bridge creating communities of embrace
Building the bridge:Creating communities of embrace
  • Processes of accountability
  • Focus on empowering Aboriginal communities and services
  • Building on strengths and culture
  • Working together to restore the circles of care