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THE PROLOGUE TO THE CANTERBURY TALES

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  1. THE PROLOGUE TO THE CANTERBURY TALES The Serjeant at the LawThe FranklinThe HaberdasherThe DyerThe CarpenterThe WeaverThe Carpet-makerThe Cook Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  2. The Serjeant at the Law Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  3. The Serjeant at the Law • Characterization • Diction • “There also was, of noted excellence Discreet he was, a man to reverence, Or so he seemed, his sayings were so wise.” (315-317) • Suggests a false appearance Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  4. The Serjeant at the Law • “His fame and learning and his high position Had won him many a robe and many a fee.” (320-321) • His wisdom resulted in this gain of materials Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  5. The Serjeant at the Law • “Though there was nowhere one so busy as he, He was less busy than he seemed to be.” (325-326) • Again, a suggestion of a false appearance Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  6. The Serjeant at the Law • Serjeants-at-the-Laws are the most prominent members of the legal profession from whose ranks the king would select judges. • The lawyer uses his wisdom to make money, gain materialistic things and increase his self-importance • The repetition of the word “seemed” suggests a false appearance of the lawyer Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  7. The Serjeant at the Law • Our Reaction • Relatively similar to the modern, stereotypical societal/comedic view of a lawyer • Greedy • Phony Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  8. The Franklin Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  9. The Franklin • Characterization • Diction • “white as a daisy-petal was his beard” (336) • Old man • Wise? Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  10. The Franklin • “He loved a morning sop of cake in wine. He lived for pleasure and had always done, For he was Epicurus’ very son, In whose opinion sensual delight Was the one true felicity in sight.” (338-342) • Epicurus • Greek philosopher who taught that happiness is the goal of life Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  11. The Franklin • “His bread, his ale were finest of the fine And no one had a better stock of wine. His house was never short of bake-meat pies, Of fish and flesh, and these in such supplies It positively snowed with meat and drink And all the dainties that a man could think.” (345-350) Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  12. The Franklin • Many of Chaucer’s characters are guilty of one or more of the seven deadly sins • The Franklin’s sin is gluttony. Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  13. The Franklin • Purpose of the Diction • Demonstrate the sin the Franklin is guilty of Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  14. The Franklin • Our Reaction to the Franklin • No dramatic opinion • Significance of gluttony from a social perspective • Not always looked down on Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  15. The Guild Members • The Haberdasher • The Dyer • The Carpenter • The Weaver • The Carpet-maker Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  16. The Guild Members • Characterization • Diction • “…were Among our ranks, all in the livery Of one impressive guild-fraternity. They were so trim and fresh their gear would pass For new. Their knives were not tricked out with brass But wrought with purest silver, which avouches A like display on girdles and pouches.” (366-372) Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  17. The Guild Members • Guilds are professional organizations for craftsmen • The characters are proud of their wealth and display it with ornate objects Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  18. The Guild Members • “Their wisdom would have justified a plan To make each one of them an alderman” (375-376) • Alderman • In England and Ireland, a senior member of a county or borough council • The chief officer in a shire Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  19. The Guild Members • “They had the capital and revenue, Besides their wives declared it was their due. And if they did not think so, then they ought; To be called “Madam” is a glorious thought, And so is going to church and being seen Having your mantle carried like a queen.” (377-382) • The wives enjoyed the status of the husbands • Gave the women social recognition Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  20. The Guild Members • Purpose of the Diction • Demonstrate the prosperity of the guild members • Demonstrate the pride associated with being a guild member Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  21. The Guild Members • Our Reaction to the Guild Members • not a dramatic reaction • we recognize that these are successful people Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  22. The Cook Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  23. The Cook • Characterization • Diction • “And he could roast and seethe and broil and fry, Make good thick soup and bake a tasty pie.” (387-388) • Talented cook Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  24. The Cook • “But what a pity—so it seemed to me, That he should have an ulcer on his knee.” (389-390) • Ulcer • An open sore on the skin or some mucous membrane, as the lining of the stomach, characterized by the disintegration of the tissue and, often, the discharge of pus Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  25. The Cook • Purpose of the Diction • Adds a humorous aspect to the tales • Reflects the gullibility of the Guild Members • “They had a Cook with them…”(383) Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales

  26. The Cook • Our Reaction to the Cook • we laugh at him • a little “grossed-out” • no strong reaction about his personality Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales