Key Concepts for Canterbury Tales / Prologue - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. Key Concepts for Canterbury Tales / Prologue

  2. Do Now (4, 8) • 1. Take out a sheet of paper. • 2. Write down 2 details that describe each of the 3 social classes in Medieval English society (Nobility, Church, and Commons). You may work alone or with a partner, but each of you should write on your own sheet of paper.

  3. Do Now (6) • 1. Look at the card on your desk. You each have a character from The Canterbury Tales. • 2. Pick out three key details that you’d like to share with the class about your character. Be prepared to share.

  4. Agenda (4) • 1. Do Now • 2. Pass up Signed Letters • 3. Finish “Meet the Pilgrims” • 4. Key Concepts for “The Prologue” PowerPoint • 5. Vocab Preview • 6. Start Reading “The Prologue” • 7. Wrap-up

  5. The Host,Harry Bailey

  6. TheKnight

  7. The Squire

  8. The Franklin

  9. The Monk

  10. The Prioress

  11. The Friar

  12. The Pardoner

  13. The Parson

  14. The Summoner

  15. The Nun’s Priest

  16. The Cook

  17. The Wife of Bath

  18. The Knight’s Yeoman

  19. The Plowman

  20. The Five Tradesmen

  21. The Canon’s Yeoman

  22. The Shipman

  23. The Physician

  24. The Merchant

  25. The Miller

  26. The Cook

  27. Sergeant-of-law

  28. The Reeve

  29. The Clerk

  30. The Manciple

  31. Meet the Pilgrims

  32. Commoners: Two Levels

  33. Frame story • Frame story – a larger story that includes one or a series of other stories • Story within a story • Main story at the beginning sets the stage for either: • A more important story OR • A series of shorter stories • Smaller stories = give reader information to help understand the bigger picture • Frame – the beginning & ending of a story • Cyclical frame story – a story in which numerous tales are connected

  34. Frame story • Gives the reader different points of view • Different levels of meaning • Unreliable narrator – narrator is not usually the actual author • Frame narrative – when the frame story’s main purpose is to set up the telling of other stories

  35. Frame story examples • Frankenstein • Heart of Darkness • Wuthering Heights • The Odyssey • Don Quixote

  36. Frame story examples • TV shows • How I Met Your Mother • Movies • Slumdog Millionaire • Forrest Gump • The Notebook

  37. Prologue • Prologue – an introduction to a work of literature that is separate from the story • Purposes: • Important info to think about while reading • Backstory

  38. Vocab Preview • Find the following words in your text (pages 1-2) and highlight them: Martyr Heathen Prudent Renowned Thrice Meek Valiant Valorous Remedy* • Look at how the words are used in the sentences. • Use your iPads (or dictionaries) to look up the words. Find the correct definition, and write it down in the margin near the word in your copy of “The Prologue”. * “remedies” in the text

  39. Vocab Preview • Martyr – a person who sacrifices life out of religious devotion • Renowned – famous; celebrated • Valiant – showing bravery or courage; heroic • Heathen – not believing in any God (not Jewish, Christian, or Muslim) • Thrice – three times

  40. Vocab Preview • Valorous – brave; courageous (like valiant) • Prudent – showing good judgment • Meek – humble, patient; not violent or aggressive in behavior • Remedy – a treatment that relieves or cures a sickness

  41. Tabard Inn

  42. Knight’s values • Chivalry - the code of conduct guiding the behavior of medieval knights • Faithfulness – loyalty; sticking to one’s word and doing one’s duties thoroughly • Honor – high respect, honesty and integrity • Liberality – the quality of being liberal, or generous • Courtesy – very polite, well-mannered behavior towards others

  43. What is Chivalry? • Chivalry – the code of conduct guiding the behavior of medieval knights • All knights should protect others who cannot protect themselves • Ideal virtues: • Honor • Courtly love • Courtesy

  44. Code of Chivalry • Expected to be truthful • Skills for war combat • Need to be loyal and generous • Respect the honor of women

  45. Courtly love • Courtly love – code for governing how lovers among the nobility should behave • Knight serves lady with same obedience and loyalty that governs his behavior towards his liege lord

  46. Jerkin with coat of plates

  47. Wife of Bath

  48. Wife of Bath • “Gap-toothed” – believed to be a sign that a woman was lustful

  49. Wimple