the relationship between language and behavior in preschool children l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 48

The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 410 Views
  • Uploaded on

The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children. Ann P. Kaiser, PhD. Department of Special Education Vanderbilt University . Collaborators . Meta analysis Megan Roberts Kelly Feeney-Kettler Jennifer Frey ML Hemmeter IES Goal 3 Kerry Hofer Megan Roberts

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children' - saxton


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
the relationship between language and behavior in preschool children

The Relationship between Language and Behavior in Preschool Children

Ann P. Kaiser, PhD

Department of Special Education

Vanderbilt University

collaborators
Collaborators
  • Meta analysis
    • Megan Roberts
    • Kelly Feeney-Kettler
    • Jennifer Frey
    • ML Hemmeter
  • IES Goal 3
    • Kerry Hofer
    • Megan Roberts
    • Ragan McLeod
    • David Dickinson, co-PI
preschool language and behavior are independent predictors of school success
Preschool Language and Behavior Are Independent Predictors of School Success
  • Language skills/ language delays are predictive of early school performance, reading, and later academic skills
  • Behavior problems/ social skills predict school outcomes, peer relationships, and long term social adjustment
  • We hypothesize that co-emergent language and behavior problems place children at greater risk for school failure and social problems
  • A large number of studies have reported associations between language delays and behavior problems across populations
goals of this presentation
Goals of This Presentation
  • Report results of meta-analysis of studies describing co-occurrence of language and behavior in young children
    • Methods used to characterize the relationship between language and behavior
  • Examine the relationship between language and behavior among children enrolled in Head Start using parallel methods
objectives of meta analysis
Objectives of Meta-Analysis
  • To evaluate the relationship of language and problem behaviors and social skills in young children
  • To examine the effects of the methods used to characterize the relationships between language and behavior on outcomes
research questions
Research Questions
  • Do children with language delays have more problem behaviors than children with typical language skills?
  • Do children with language delays have poorer social skills than children with typical language skills?
  • Do apparent outcomes vary based on the methodology used to characterize the language and behavior relationship?
meta analysis methods inclusion criteria
Meta Analysis Methods: Inclusion Criteria
  • Population:
    • Children between 18 months and 8, 11 months.
    • At least some study participants with “language impairment” or “language delays.”
      • Late Talkers
      • Specific Language Impairment
    • No other primary disability classification other than language impairment
    • IQ score of 70 or greater

Inclusion criteria shaped by the available literature

meta analysis methods inclusion criteria10
Meta Analysis Methods: Inclusion Criteria
  • Types of studies
    • Written in English
    • Provided empirical evidence
      • Comparative data on typical and low language children for current analysis
      • Measures of both language and behavior
methods inclusion criteria
Methods: Inclusion Criteria
  • Outcome measures
    • At least one of the following measure of problem behaviors or social competence
      • Direct observation
      • Parent or teacher/other caregiver interview
      • Parent or teacher/other caregiver rating scale
methods selection of studies
Methods: Selection of Studies
  • Phase 1: abstracts screened for inclusion criteria
    • 665 125
    • Primary reasons for exclusion: no comparison between children with and without language delays, age of participants, no problem behavior or social skills measures
  • Phase 2: full text study reports reviewed
    • 125  58
  • Phase 3: full coding for group comparison analysis
    • 58 24
meta analysis methods data extraction
Meta Analysis Methods: Data Extraction
  • Two reviewers independently coded each full article using a detailed coding protocol
  • Coding disagreements were discussed and resolved so that only data with perfect agreement was included in the analysis.
methods data synthesis
Methods: Data Synthesis
  • Effect size calculations
    • For means and standard deviations
    • For F values:
  • Effect size adjustments
    • Hedges small sample correction
methods data synthesis16
Methods: Data Synthesis
  • Independence of effect sizes
    • Multiple groups
      • Groups with different ages were averaged
      • Groups with different language abilities were averaged
    • Multiple measures
      • Constructs analyzed separately
      • When multiple measures of the same construct the effect sizes were averaged
methods statistical model
Methods: Statistical Model
  • Mean effect size was calculated by weighting each adjusted effect size by the inverse of its variance.
results study characteristics
Results: Study Characteristics
  • 24 studies
    • Sample size: Mn = 90.8 (range: 15 to 798)
    • Child Age: 18 to 95 months
meta analysis outcome measures
Meta Analysis : Outcome Measures
  • Internalizing : 10 studies
    • Teacher and Parent Rating Scales (e.g., CBCL; CTRF)
  • Externalizing: 11 studies
    • Teacher and Parent Rating Scales (e.g., CBCL; CTRF)
  • Total Problem Behavior: 12 studies
    • Teacher and Parent Rating Scales (e.g., CBCL; CTRF)
  • Social Skills: 17 studies
    • Observational measures (e.g., social interaction coding system; social participation and cognitive play scale).
results internalizing
Results: Internalizing
  • 10 studies; 770 participants
  • ES = .60, p=0.00
results externalizing
Results: Externalizing
  • 11 studies, 788 participants
  • ES = .40, p=0.00
results total problem behaviors
Results: Total Problem Behaviors
  • 12 studies; 1636 participants
  • ES =.39, p=.00
meta analysis results social skills
Meta Analysis Results: Social Skills
  • 17 studies, 987 participants
  • ES = .832, p=0.00
conclusion i
Conclusion I
  • Children with language delays have more problem behaviors than children with typical language skills.
    • ES internalizing = .6
    • ES externalizing =.4
    • ES problem behavior =.39
  • Children with language delays have poorer social skills than children with typical language skills.
    • ES social skills= .832
meta analysis results
Meta Analysis Results
  • Chi square
  • Odds ratio
meta analysis conclusion ii
Meta-Analysis: Conclusion II
  • More children with low language have clinical level behavior problems
  • Risk for behavior is greater for children with low language
meta analysis limitations
Meta-Analysis Limitations
  • Age range is somewhat dichotomous
    • Toddlers ( below 30 months)
    • Later preschool/ kindergarten
    • Missing children ages 30-50 months
    • Concurrent samples, no longitudinal studies
      • Stability and developmental patterns unknown
      • No prediction of impact of behavior on language, achievement
    • Wide variations in measures of language, behavior and social skills
      • Method may contribute to variance in findings
limitations
Limitations
  • Relatively small data set for exploring complex relationships
  • Data reported in most studies do not allow determination of
    • Percentage of children with low language have clinical/subclinical behavior problems
    • Odds that a child with low language has a behavior problem
    • Environmental factors are associated with emergent behavior problems (e.g., parenting)
language and behavior among children enrolled in head start
Language and Behavior Among Children Enrolled in Head Start
  • IES Goal 3, ongoing
  • Teacher Enhanced Language and Literacy (TELL)
  • In Collaboration with the
  • Jefferson County Council on Economic Opportunity
  • Birmingham, AL
child participants
Child Participants
  • 472 children
    • From 6 centers, 52 classrooms
  • 230 children with low language ( PLS < 76)
    • % boys
    • Mn Age at T0
    • % African American
  • 242 children with typical language (PLS> 75)
    • % boys
    • Mn Age at T0
    • % African American
    • 8 children from each classroom with low and typical children matched for age, gender
    • No main effects on PLS by group
    • Children tested in late summer (T0) and spring (T1)of 4 year old year
primary measures t0 and t1
Primary Measures : T0 and T1
  • Preschool Language Scale III (Zimmerman, Steiner & Pond, l992)
    • Total standard score
  • Child Behavior Checklist – Teacher Report Form (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2000)
    • Internalizing T score
    • Externalizing T score
    • Total Problem Behavior T score
  • Social Skills Rating Scale (Gresham & Elliot, l990)
    • Social Skills Subscale standard score
research questions33
Research Questions
  • To evaluate the relationship of language and problem behaviors and social skills in young children at T0 and T1
  • To examine the effects of the methods used to characterize the relationships between language and behavior on outcomes
    • Mn scores for internalizing, externalizing, problem behavior and social skills
    • Percentages of children at clinical/subclinical levels for behavior and social skills
    • Relative risk for behavior among low language and typical language children ( odds ratio)
    • Effects of behavior on language growth during preschool
guide to the slides
Guide to the slides
  • Yikes too much information!!
  • T0 low language T0 behavior and T1 behavior
  • T1 low language T1 behavior
  • Mean score or percentage
  • Effect size (ES)
  • Significance
slide35
TELL Results: Children with low language at T0 and T1 have significantly higher internalizing, externalizing, problem behavior behavior
tell results
TELL Results
  • A higher percentage of children with T0 low language have Externalizing and Total
  • Problem Behavior at the clinical level at T1
  • A higher percentage of children with T1 low language have Internalizing, Externalizing and Total Problem Behavior at the clinical level at T1
slide39
TELL Results: Children with low language are approximately twice as likely to have clinical/subclinical behavior at end of preschool
slide42
TELL Results : Effects of behavior on language growth during preschoolChildren with low language at T0 show less growth
tell conclusions the bottom line
TELL Conclusions: The bottom line
  • Preschool low SES children with low language are about twice as likely to have clinical/ subclinical behavior problems than children with typical language
  • Although differences in levels of behavior are relatively small, there is evidence of persistent effects of these differences across the preschool year.
  • Behavior problems at the beginning of preschool predict language at the end of preschool and growth during the preschool year
further analyses are needed
Further analyses are needed
  • Is the relationship between language delay and problem behaviors the same across ages?
  • Is the relationship between language delay and problem behaviors the same depending on type of language delay (e.g., expressive only, mixed expressive-receptive)?
  • Is there evidence of specific types (syndromes) of behavior differentially affecting language?
  • What are the longer term effects of behavior on reading and achievement?
limitations46
Limitations
  • Selection of sample impacts the results
recommendations for practice
Recommendations for Practice
  • Screening and assessment for language problems should also involve screening and assessment for behavior problems and social skills.
  • Early intervention for young children’s language development needs to concurrently address children’s behavioral and social functioning.
  • Practitioners who work with young children that have language delays should monitor behavior and social skill development
    • Course of development in related areas is unknown
    • Children with persistent language delays may be at greater risk
for more information
For more information
  • Ann.Kaiser@Vanderbilt.edu