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P P & E Personal Protective Equipment
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  1. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment San Juan College/Regional Energy Training Center 800 S. Hutton Farmington, NM 87401

  2. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • PPE in the past • Personal Protective Equipment in the Past • People have used personal protective equipment (PPE) for centuries to protect themselves while they work. For example: • * Medieval knights had armor • * Blacksmiths have always used a leather apron • * Cowboys wear leather chaps • * Eskimos wear a heavy parka, gloves, and boots • * Firemen wear heavy coats and special helmets • * Personal protective equipment today, as in the past, makes working safer and you more productive.

  3. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • The "Personal Protective Equipment" Standard • Personal protection equipment is important. So important, that in 1994, OSHA (the Occupational Safety and Health Administration) established 29 CFR 1910.132-138, the "Personal Protection Equipment" standard. • Briefly stated, this standard requires that employers must establish and administer an effective PPE (Personal Protection Equipment) program for employees and that employees be trained in the proper use of PPE.

  4. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities AssessmentEmployers are required to conduct an assessment to determine the various physical hazards that may be present in your work area. • Physical hazards include:* Sources of motion;* Sources of high and low temperatures;* Sources of light radiation    - welding    - brazing    - heat treating    - high intensity lights;* Sources of falling objects;* Sources of sharp objects;* Sources of rolling or pinching objects;* Sources of electric hazards; and* Floor conditions.

  5. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities • Assessment:As part of the assessment, employers must also determine the various health hazards that may be present in your work area. • Health hazards include:- Types of chemicals you could be exposed to;- Sources of harmful dusts; and- Sources of nuclear radiation.

  6. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities Selection of PPEOnce your area has been assessed, your employer must select, with your help, appropriate personal protection equipment for you to use while performing your job.

  7. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities • Providing PPEOnce your area has been assessed, your employer must provide, at no cost to you, appropriate personal protection equipment that fits, for you to use while performing your job. • NOTE: If you have your own personal protective equipment, it must be approved by your employer before you can use it on the job. Check with your supervisor or safety manager before using your own equipment.

  8. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities • Training:Your employer must also provide you with training. Your training must include: • * When PPE is necessary;* What PPE is necessary;* How to properly use your PPE;* How to care for your PPE; and* How to store your PPE.

  9. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities • Maintenance of PPE • In addition to providing you with PPE, your employer must maintain the PPE used by employees. If a piece of PPE cannot be repaired, it must be discarded and replaced.

  10. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employer Responsibilities • Recordkeeping: Finally, your employer must maintain records of the workplace assessment and of your training.

  11. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employee Responsibilities • Attend Training SessionsYou are responsible for attending all PPE training sessions. Remember, the best PPE in the world is useless unless you know how to use and care for it!

  12. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employee Responsibilities • Assess Potential HazardsBefore you start any job, assess the real and potential hazards associated with that job.

  13. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employee Responsibilities • Follow ALL Warnings and Precautions • Take time to read any and all warnings and precautions that may appear on tools, equipment, chemicals, MSDSs, and personal protective equipment.

  14. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employee Responsibilities • Listen and Follow DirectionsListen and follow the directions that you may be given by your supervisor or safety manager. They want you to return home today, and everyday, safe and sound to your family and friends.

  15. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Employee Responsibilities • Reportany and ALL unsafe conditions you may find in your work area to your supervisor or safety manager. • REMEMBER: Safety is a team effort!

  16. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Why Eye and Face Protection is Important • Thousands of people are blinded each year from work related eye injuries. Injuries that could have been prevented, if only people would have used eye or face protection.

  17. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • The Delicate Structure of the Eye • Your eyes are very delicate. You can think of them as the color television cameras for your brain. Like a camera, your eyes include: • - A lens that focuses light; - An iris that controls the amount of light that enters the   eye; - Receptors that "pick up" the image of what you see,   and; - An optic nerve that serves as a "cable" to transmit   information from the receptors in your eye to your   brain. • Unlike a television camera that is made of plastic and metal, your eye is made of soft tissues and blood vessels. Damage your eyes, and you have big trouble. Trouble that is often permanent.

  18. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • What Types of Accidents Cause Eye Injuries? • The major types of accidents that cause blindness include: • - Objects striking the eye; - Contact with chemicals and other hazardous materials;- Being struck by swinging objects such as chains and ropes; and - Viewing radiant energy sources such as welding operations or lasers.

  19. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Dusts, Powders, Fumes, and Mists • Small particles of matter can enter your eyes and damage them. Operations such as grinding, chiseling, sanding, hammering, and spraying can create small airborne particles; particles that can injure your eyes.

  20. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Toxic Gases, Vapors, and LiquidsToxic chemicals in the form of gases, vapors, and liquids can damage your eyes. Always read the appropriate MSDS before working with any hazardous material. • NOTE: Some manufacturing processes produce hazardous gases, vapors and liquids. Always check with your supervisor or safety manager to learn the type of eye or face protection you will need to use in order to work safely.

  21. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Flying Objects or ParticlesOperations such as grinding, chiseling, sanding, and hammering often create flying objects or particles that can damage your eyes.

  22. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Large ObjectsLarge objects such as:  • 1. swinging chains, cables and ropes;2. tools that are thrown or fall;3. any sharp objects such as knives, scissors, pencils, etc.; and 4. walking or falling into obstructions can damage your eyes or face.

  23. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Molten MetalsOperations which involve or produce molten metals, if splashed, splattered, or dripped into the eyes, cause severe burns and tissue damage.

  24. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Electrical HazardsAny time you work around electricity, there is the potential for arcs and sparks to occur. Take time to talk with your supervisor or safety manager concerning the type of eye protection you should wear if you will be working around electrical hazards.

  25. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Thermal and Radiation Hazards • Operations such as welding, metal cutting, and working around furnaces can expose your eyes to heat, glare, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. Check with your supervisor or safety manager to learn the specific type of eye protection you will need to use during these types of operations.

  26. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Thermal and Radiation HazardsOperations such as welding, metal cutting, and working around furnaces can expose your eyes to heat, glare, ultraviolet, and infrared radiation. Check with your supervisor or safety manager to learn the specific type of eye protection you will need to use during these types of operations.

  27. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Lasers • Laser beams present a new hazard in some workplaces. Because there are different types of lasers, check with your supervisor or safety manager to determine the type of eye protection you need to use while working with lasers.

  28. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • Machine GuardsMany types of machines such as lathes, grinders, and sanders are equipped with guards, shields and screens. Always make sure that guards, shields, and screens are in place and in good working order before using these types of machines. And, don't forget to wear eye protection.

  29. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • Work Area BarriersOperations such as sanding, grinding, welding, and lathe operations produce dust, vapors, and flying particles. To protect other workers, work area barriers such as movable screens and barriers should be set up to separate workers and bystanders from hazardous operations.

  30. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • VentilationOperations which use or produce vapors, gases, mists, dusts, powders, and other airborne particles should be ventilated. Ventilation, along with damping systems, can significantly reduce the amount of airborne particles that could be hazardous to your eyes.

  31. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • LightingGood lighting is important in work areas. Good lighting reduces eye strain and glare. It also promotes both safety and improved productivity.

  32. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • Signs and WarningsObstructions and protruding objects should be identified and marked. Use caution when working around obstructions and protruding objects.

  33. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures Eyewash StationsEyewash stations should be located within 100 feet of your work area. If you accidentally get something in your eyes, go directly to the eyewash station and flush your eyes with water for 15 minutes. Be sure to hold your eyes open with your fingers and "look" directly into the water streams. DO NOT RUB YOUR EYES! Rubbing your eyes may scratch or embed particles into your eyes. Once you have flushed your eyes with water, seek medical attention immediately. • CAUTION: Some chemicals are water reactive and become toxic when mixed with water. Talk with your supervisor or safety manager about the chemicals you will be using on your job. Be familiar with the MSDSs for all chemicals used in your job.

  34. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Protective Measures • Safe Work PracticesAs you work: • - Read and follow all warnings and precautions that   may be found on equipment and hazardous   materials; - Do not throw tools or participate in horseplay; - Keep sharp or pointed objects away from your eyes; and - Follow your supervisor's or safety manager's suggestions and recommendations for working safely.

  35. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Personal Protective Equipment • Safety Glasses: • Safety glasses are perhaps the most widely used type of eye protection. While they may look similar to regular glasses, they are much stronger and more resistant to impact and heat than regular glasses. In addition, most safety glasses are equipped with side shields that give you protection from hazards that may not be directly in front of you. Both prescription and nonprescription safety glasses are available. In addition, a wide variety of lens coatings are available for special work situations. Safety glasses should be Z-87 approved to meet OSHA regulations.

  36. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Personal Protective Equipment • GogglesGoggles give you more protection than safety glasses because they fit closer to your face. Because goggles surround the eye area, they give you more protection in situations where you might encounter splashing liquids, fumes, vapors, powders, dusts, and mists. Different types of goggles are available. They must indicate that they are chemical splash goggles to be worn for that purpose.

  37. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Personal Protective Equipment • Face Shields • Face shields offer you full face protection and are often used around operations which expose you to molten metal, chemical splashes, or flying particles. Many face shields can be used while wearing a hard hat. • NOTE: You should always wear safety glasses or goggles when using a face shield for added protection. Face shields alone are NOT considered adequate eye protection.

  38. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Personal Protective Equipment • Welding Helmets • Welding helmets provide both face and eye protection. Welding helmets use special absorptive lenses that filter the intense light and radiant energy that is produced during welding operations. As with face shields, safety glasses or goggles should be worn when using a welding helmet.

  39. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Personal Protective Equipment • Absorptive LensesThough you may not be a welder, a wide variety of absorptive lenses are available for use in safety glasses and goggles. These absorptive lenses offer additional protection if you must work where there is bright light or glare.

  40. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Contact Lenses • If you wear contacts, keep the following safety tips in mind.- You may not wear your contacts while using   a full face respirator.  - Wear your contacts with caution if you work in areas where you might be exposed to fumes, dusts, powders, vapors, chemical splashes, molten metals, or intense heat, light or glare.  - If you get anything under your contacts, take time to remove and clean them. Follow  your eye doctor's instructions for cleaning and caring for your contacts.  - Some chemicals can react with contacts and cause permanent injury.  - It is wise to keep an extra pair of contacts or a pair of glasses handy in case you should lose or damage one of your contacts while you are working.

  41. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Care of Eye Protection Equipment - Clean your eye protection equipment. You can usually use mild soap and water. You may also use special wipes that are designed for cleaning protective eye equipment. Never use abrasive soaps, rough paper, or cloth towels.   These items will scratch and damage your equipment. - Always keep your eye protection equipment in good working condition. If it is damaged, have it repaired or replaced. - Store your eye protection equipment in a sanitary, cool, dry area away from moisture.  - Read the manufacturer's directions and   warnings before using any eye protection equipment.  - If you have any questions concerning your eye protection equipment, talk with your supervisor or safety manager.

  42. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Vision Exams • Let's face it. You only have two eyes, and they must last you a lifetime.As you age, your eyes will change. These changes can affect your safety at work and at home. So, it's a good idea to take a little time each year for a vision exam.

  43. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Why Respiratory Protection is Important • Health hazards in the workplace are a major concern for both employers and employees. It is important, though, to remember that hazardous materials only present a health hazard when they come into contact with your body. Hazardous materials can enter your body in three ways: • 1. Ingestion 2. Skin Absorption 3. Inhalation • Because many substances which are health hazards can become airborne, knowing how to protect yourself is very important.

  44. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Inhalation • Of the three ways that hazardous materials can enter your body, inhalation is the most common route of exposure for most materials which are health hazards. This includes breathing in dust, fumes, oil mist, and vapors from solvents and various gases.

  45. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • The Breathing Process • To better understand how health hazards can enter your body by inhalation, let's take a closer look at the breathing process. • - Whenever you take a breath, oxygen rich air is      taken into your body through your mouth and nose,   goes down your windpipe and into your lungs.- In your lungs, there are tiny air sacs called alveoli.- These delicate air sacs then transfer the oxygen that    is in the air into your blood. At the same time the    oxygen is being absorbed into your bloodstream,    carbon dioxide is being transferred from your    bloodstream into the air sacs.- When you breathe out, you are ridding your body of    gaseous wastes.

  46. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Lung Damage • Inhaling hazardous materials damages the delicate structure of your lungs. Lungs that have been damaged are more susceptible to respiratory diseases. These diseases often cannot be cured, and eventually lead to death. In short, respiratory protection is serious business.

  47. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Dusts • Dusts are formed whenever solid material is broken down into tiny particles. Dusts are often produced during sanding and grinding operations.

  48. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Vapors • Vapors are substances that are created when a solid or liquid material evaporates. Materials that evaporate easily at room temperature include paint thinner, solvents, and gasoline.

  49. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Fogsare vapors which have condensed into tiny airborne particles or droplets. An example of a hazardous fog would be an insect fogger used to rid industrial and residential areas of ticks and fleas.

  50. P P & EPersonal Protective Equipment • Potential Hazards • Mists & SpraysMists and sprays are very small droplets of liquid material suspended in the air. They are often produced by spray and coating operations.