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Brain lateralization - vision & sensory/motor systems - that why we learn pathways - language - we’ll learn here - Split Brains. Cerebral lateralization Left Right serial - parallel language - faces/ patterns - emotional stuff - music - spatial ability.

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

Brain lateralization

- vision & sensory/motor systems

- that why we learn pathways

- language

- we’ll learn here

- Split Brains

slide13

Cerebral lateralization

  • Left Right
  • serial - parallel
  • language - faces/ patterns
          • - emotional stuff
          • - music
          • - spatial ability
slide17

Language in the Brain

Learn about language?

Lesion studies

‘Tan’ - famous patient

Broca’s Aphasia

- slow labored speech

- not fluent - little/no language production

- some sing/hum familiar tunes

- use nouns & verbs (essential meaning)

- no conjuctions, prepositions, pronouns ( grammar)

The general commands the army.

No ifs ands or buts.

slide19

Language in the Brain

Broca’s Aphasia

Agrammatism

Anomia

Articulation

slide23

Language in the Brain

Wernicke’s Aphasia

- receptive deficit

Pure word deafness

- fail to recognize word (?)

recognize emotion, source

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

- language loses meaning

- can still repeat

- damage - posterior language area

Conduction Aphasia

- good comprehension, production

- poor repetition

- damage - arcuate fasciculus

slide26

Language in the Brain

Wernicke’s Aphasia

- receptive deficit

Pure word deafness

- fail to recognize word (?)

recognize emotion, source

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

- language loses meaning

- can still repeat

- damage - posterior language area

Conduction Aphasia

- good comprehension, production

- poor repetition

- damage - arcuate fasciculus

slide39

Aphasia Area Speech Comp Repet Naming

Wernicke’s STG fluent poor poor poor

Broca’s frontal nonfluent good poor? good

Conduction Arc. Fas. fluent good poor good

Transcortical Posterior fluent poor good poor

Sensory Language

slide41

Language in the Brain

Anomia revisitied

- temporal lobe damage

- pole

- proper nouns (people places things)

- inferior temporal

- common nouns (categories)

Verbs

- frontal

- cerebellar

slide50

Language Development

- receptive - productive

- speech - written

slide51

Language in the Brain

Reading

2 types

- phonological (phonetic)

- sound it out

- learning phase

- slow

- graphemic ( whole word, lexical)

- recognize word, irregular word

- Chi Chi Rodriguez

- epinephrine

- fast, error prone if proofreading

slide52

Language in the Brain

Dyslexia

- lots of different types

Developmental - won’t cover

Aquired dyslexias

Surface dyslexia - no whole-word reading

Phonological dyslexia - can not sound out

Word-form dyslexia (letter-by-letter)

Direct dyslexia (deep dyslexia)