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Student Driven Learning
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  1. Student Driven Learning 2013 Learning Conference The Metamorphosis Project

  2. Lisa Lewis – MBJH, 7th grade Social Studies Mary Phillips – MBJH, 8th grade English

  3. Agenda • 1. Strategy • 2. Examples • 3. Your turn

  4. What started this conversation?

  5. Make Just One Change • Strategy for deploying student driven learning • Uncovered on the web • A new way of looking at engagement

  6. Why Inquiry? • Choice • Authenticity • Affiliation • Novelty • Content • Organization

  7. QFT • Question Focus • Statement • Visual • Aural Intended to facilitate thinking, not a question, does not reveal teacher opinion Examples: Pollution causes harm to Birmingham citizens. Torture can be justified. Crime in the African American community caused by disintegration of the traditional family structure.

  8. Rules • 1. Ask as many questions as you can. • 2. Do not stop to discuss, judge or answer the questions. • 3. Write down every question exactly as it is stated. • 4. Change any statement into a question.

  9. Improve Your Questions • Open-ended vs. Closed-ended questions • Change open to closed. • Change closed to open. • Discuss.

  10. Prioritize Your Questions • Most important? • Want or need to answer? • Most interest to you?

  11. Reflection • Sample questions: • What did you learn? • Why is learning to ask your own questions important for your learning? • What have you learned from the pactice of asking questions? • How did you learn it? • How do you feel now about asking questions? • What did you think about the work? • How can you use what you learned about asking questions?

  12. Next Step What will you do with your questions?

  13. Give us your thoughts! • How do you think you can use this strategy? • What problems do you foresee?

  14. Practice! • Here are three QFT’s. Pick one: Pollution causes harm to Birmingham citizens. Torture can be justified. Crime in the African American community caused by disintegration of the traditional family structure. In the next 5 minutes follow the rules to generate your questions.

  15. Rules • 1. Ask as many questions as you can. • 2. Do not stop to discuss, judge or answer the questions. • 3. Write down every question exactly as it is stated. • 4. Change any statement into a question.

  16. How I used this: • Topic: Citizenship and Voting • Generated questions • Researched answers • Demonstrated learning Results: Questions, Infographics Differentiated Assessment

  17. QFT: Voting • Class one: • 1. Why do we vote? • 2. Are there many countries with free elections? • 3. How did voting begin in the United States? • 4. What does the registration process look like? • 5. How do people who live in districts and territories of the US vote? • 6. What are some of the ways that elections can be rigged? • 7. Why don’t people vote? • 8. How did political parties begin? • 9. How can you lose the right to vote? • Class Two: • 1. How can you lose your right to vote? • 2. What are ways that elections can be rigged? • 3. How are presidential candidates chosen? • 4. What are the requirements for voting? • 5. What is the process of voting? • 6. What are the reasons people don’t vote? • 7. How is voting controlled by the government? • 8. Who are the citiens most and least likely to vote? • 9. How are elections held?

  18. Research • My students had to find answers to their questions. They could use textbooks, library resources, videos and anything on the internet (not Wikipedia, or other sites given on a list) • They also had to add one additional question that wasn’t on the list. • Using the results of their research, they had to create infographics for a particular audience.

  19. Infographics • Differentiate work products by assigning different audiences to the like-ability groups. • Example: • High capability – audience is group of US representatives and senators, topic is citizenship process • Medium to low capability – audience was group of 3rd graders, topic is voting • Examples

  20. How can you use this in your classroom?