Download
moving and rescuing victims n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Moving And Rescuing Victims PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Moving And Rescuing Victims

Moving And Rescuing Victims

102 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Moving And Rescuing Victims

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Moving And Rescuing Victims

  2. Emergency Moves • Pull victim in direction of long axis • Tug on clothing in the neck and shoulder area • Pull victim onto a blanket, then drag blanket • Consider your strength, protect back, remain stable

  3. Drowning • Types: • Dry • Absence of water • Due to larynospasm (voice box) • 10% • Wet • Water in lungs (85%) • Secondary • Resuscitated but dies within 96 hours

  4. Drowning Prevention • Wear life vests • Make wise decisions around water • Even good swimmers get in trouble • Never swim alone • Know your capabilities • Know the body of water

  5. Drowning Prevention #2 • Keep pools fenced • Gates locked • Monitor small children • Wear life jacket

  6. Someone is in obvious trouble in a nearby body of water. What would you do?

  7. Reach / Wade /Throw /Row / Go

  8. Reach • Simplest way to rescue • Safest • Secure your footing or have a bystander grab your belt or pants • Reach out to the victim with a gaff, pole, stick, ladder or other object

  9. Wade • Wade out into shallow water to aid in the “reach” process

  10. Throw • Throw anything that floats: flotation device, empty fuel cans, plastic containers, cushions, short pieces of wood • (Hopefully you have a rope to tie to the thrown object)

  11. Row • Row out on a sailboard, boogie board, rowboat, canoe, ski, or other • Requires skill gained through practice • Is safer than a swimming rescue • Pull victim in over the back of the boat, never the side

  12. Go • Swimming rescue • Difficult and hazardous • Requires skill, training, excellent physical condition • Victim and rescuer often die

  13. Now that the victim is rescued, what should you do? • If victim was diving, suspect spinal cord injury • Keep victim “in-line” floating unless CPR is required • Check ABC’s – not breathing? Give CPR • No spinal cord injury suspected, place on side to allow fluids to drain from airway • All drowning victims should be seen by a physician

  14. Cold Water Immersion may lead to Hypothermia (70 degree water or less) • Heat loss in 25 times faster in water than exposure to cold air • Titanic deaths primarily due to hypothermia • (2 hours before help arrived) • Should you swim or tread water or huddle (p.417)? • First aid? Same as for drowning victims EXCEPT: Continue CPR longer than 30 minutes

  15. After The Rescue • Protect yourself and the victim from cold • Dry clothing • Give CPR if necessary • Do not start CPR if submerged > 60 minutes • All rescued victims should be seen by a physician

  16. Ice Rescue: High Risk • Extend a pole or floatable object with a rope attached • Form human chain?? • Lie flat, push a ladder, plank, or tire (secured with a rope) out ahead of yourself • Stay off frozen bodies of water

  17. At The Beach • Watch for posted warning flags • Rip tide • Undertow

  18. Confined Spaces • Tanks • Vats • Silos • Bins • Trenches • Pits

  19. Confined Spaces: What To Do • Immediately call for help • Do not rush in to help • If you are the attendant: • Do not enter the confined space unless: • You are relieved by another attendant • You are part of the rescue team • When help arrives, try to rescue without entering the space • If space must be entered, allow trained and equipped rescuers to enter (harnesses) • Give first aid, rescue breathing, CPR

  20. Triage (Multiple Victims) • To sort or prioritize victims • Goal: greatest good for the greatest number of victims • Survey the scene • Call EMS • Decide who is to be cared for and transported first

  21. Triage: Classifying Victims • 1) Immediate care • Life-threatening injuries but can be saved • 2) Urgent care • Victim does not fit in category 1 or 3 • 3) Delayed care • Minor injuries, can be delayed up to 3 hours • 4) Dead

  22. A brick surface near the top of Twin Towers has fallen and many students have been injured. You have surveyed the scene and called 911. Now, what should you do?

  23. What To Do? • You are the “take charge” person • Recruit the help of bystanders • Tell all who can “get up and walk” to move to a designated location (delayed priority) • Go to motionless victims firstCONTROVERSIAL (move rapidly – no more than 60 seconds per person) • Re-asses victims regularly • Organized chaos

  24. Behavorial Emergencies: 21Childbirth: 20