Why do we teach ??? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Why do we teach ???

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  1. Why do weteach???

  2. Why teach? • 1. • 2. • 3. • 4. • 5.

  3. Reasons • 1. To Enthuse Students

  4. Reasons • 1. To Enthuse Students • How? Put yourself in their shoes, • Consider, if you’ve taught the topic for years... • Consider, if new to you to do...

  5. Reasons • 2. To give students the info they need

  6. Reasons • 2. To give students the info they need • How? Handouts can give 10 times more material, but must mix info with other materials (Make sure handout has lots of free space)

  7. Reasons • 3. To cover the syllabus

  8. Reasons • 3. To cover the syllabus • How? In a meaningfully manner. Give the students time to reflect and revise. So stop teaching for the last 3 weeks and get students to reflect and revise.

  9. Reasons • 4. Give the student group a sense of identity

  10. Reasons • 4. Give the student group a sense of identity • How? Group work is vital

  11. Reasons • 5. Because it’s cost-effective - large groups

  12. Reasons • 5. Because it’s cost-effective - large groups • How? Instead of throwing out questions to students (as some may be intimidated) ask student to spend next 3 minutes writing down 3 most important ideas we’ve been talking about, and spend a minute comparing you’ve with your neighbour…look for 5 volunteers. • Rather than getting student to asks questions; at end of class collect on slips of paper and answer at start of next class or on-line on discussion board.

  13. Reasons • 6. To help map curriculum

  14. Reasons • 6. To help map curriculum • How? Signpost the course. Show the students the syllabus, included learning outcomes. Number the topics instead of bullet pointing them

  15. Reasons • 7. To see how the students are doing

  16. Reasons • 7. To see how the students are doing • How? Look at their faces • How? Handout your slides, with first slide having questions about previous lecture - spend 5 minutes of lecture getting student to answer.

  17. Reasons • 8. To change student beliefs

  18. Reasons • 8. To change student beliefs • How? By sharing your experience + Expert views + Existing Theories + Other students ideas. • Make the student’s learning active, when students apply their ideas, it becomes their knowledge.

  19. Reasons • 9. To help students learn

  20. Reasons • 9. To help students learn • How? For a few minutes ask the students to reflect on HOW they are learning. Share with others their approaches, their triumphs and disasters. • How? Stop class for a few minutes and discuss their note-making techniques. • How? Ask student to write down 3 things they don’t yet know about a topic and want to learn…amalgamate lists and hand to lecturer

  21. Reasons • 10. To help students figure out what the lecturer is going to ask in the exam

  22. Reasons • 10. To help students figure out what the lecturer is going to ask in the exam • How? Students need to be more strategic about assessment, it is an intelligent response to their situation. But you just need to help them figure out your culture of assessment, not every little facet of it.

  23. What can lecturers do? • Get a notebook per course. • Include attendance sheets, handouts, slides, etc. • After each lecture • Note down errors in slides and handouts • Write down key points of lecture • Tricky issues • Good examples

  24. What can lecturers do? • Include questions after each lecture • What did I do best? • What should I avoid? • What surprised me? • What were the good student questions? • What couldn’t the students answer?

  25. Zone of Proximal Development • Vygotsky’s term for the range of tasks that are too difficult for the child to master alone but that can be learned with guidance and assistance of adults or more-skilled children. • The lower limit of ZPD is the level of skill reached by the child working independently. • The upper limit is the level of additional responsibility the child can accept with the assistance of an able instructor. • Scaffolding is changing the level of support. Over the course of a teaching session, a more-skilled person adjusts the amount of guidance to fit the child’s current performance

  26. Instructional Design • Maximise the effectiveness, efficiency and appeal of instruction and other learning experiences. • The process consists of determining the current state and needs of the learner, defining the end goal of instruction, and creating some "intervention" to assist in the transition. • The outcome of this instruction may be directly observable and scientifically measured or completely hidden and assumed.

  27. POP QUIZ

  28. POP QUIZ 1. On average do students prefer to work alone or in groups? a) in groups b) alone c) dunno

  29. POP QUIZ 1. On average do students prefer to work alone or in groups? a) in groups +1 b) alone -1 c) dunno 0

  30. POP QUIZ 2. Is it better for students to work collaboratively or competitively? a) collaboratively b) competitively c) Equally good for their learning

  31. POP QUIZ 2. Is it better for students to work collaboratively or competitively? a) collaboratively +1 b) competitively -1 c) Equally good for their learning 0

  32. POP QUIZ 3. Do students learn better if you offer a small reward? a) Yes b) No c) dunno

  33. POP QUIZ 3. Do students learn better if you offer a small reward? a) Yes -1 b) No +1 c) dunno 0

  34. POP QUIZ 4. Which is better, detailed feedback 3 weeks after an assignment in handed up, or a % result one week later? a) Feedback b) Percentage c) dunno

  35. POP QUIZ 4. Which is better, detailed feedback 3 weeks after an assignment in handed up, or a % result one week later? a) Feedback -1 b) Percentage +1 c) dunno 0

  36. POP QUIZ 5. How soon after a lecture starts will a student’s attention tend to drift? a) 10 mins b) 20 mins c) 40 mins

  37. POP QUIZ 5. How soon after a lecture starts will a student’s attention tend to drift? a) 10 mins +1 b) 20 mins 0 c) 40 mins -1

  38. If you read one book on teaching... • “Lecturing: A Practical Guide” by Sally Brown and Phil Race