jon carling head of nerip north east regional information partnership l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Jon Carling Head of NERIP North East Regional Information Partnership PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Jon Carling Head of NERIP North East Regional Information Partnership

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 23

Jon Carling Head of NERIP North East Regional Information Partnership - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 120 Views
  • Uploaded on

Workplace and Commuting Research – Phase 1. Jon Carling Head of NERIP North East Regional Information Partnership. Professor Alan Townsend Sinclair Sutherland. Data source, geographies. 2001 Census of Population (29 April 2001) North East Government Office Region: Four sub-regions:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Jon Carling Head of NERIP North East Regional Information Partnership' - quinto


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
data source geographies
Data source, geographies
  • 2001 Census of Population (29 April 2001)
  • North East Government Office Region:
  • Four sub-regions:
    • Northumberland County
    • Tyne & Wear Metropolitan County
    • County Durham
    • Tees Valley
  • 23 local authority districts
  • Commuting to/from surrounding regions:
    • Yorkshire & Humber; North West; Scotland; rest of UK
a word of caution
A Word of Caution
  • Data quality relies on accuracy of data recorded on form:
    • In Tyne & Wear: 339 in commuters travel over 60 km on foot
    • In Alnwick: 12 people working in the district travel less than 10kms to work by underground/Metro
  • Disclosure control adjustments affect data. Resident population of Tees Valley:
    • 256,369 according to SWS table 101
    • 256,247 according to SWS table 107
  • moral: be cautious of small numbers or small differences
report contents
Report Contents
  • 1 Executive summary
  • 2 Introduction
  • Part A: Topic Analyses
    • 3 Workers, residents and commuters
    • 4 Origins and destinations of commuters
    • 5 Distance and method of travel to work
    • 6 Age, hours worked, employment status
    • 7 Industry, occupation and socio-economic class
    • 8 Homeworkers and mobile workers
  • Part B: Districts
    • 9 District level summary and table of – key facts
    • 10 four maps
executive summary 1
Executive summary (1)
  • The 2001 Census shows increased mobility (accelerated in some areas through industrial closures) and a gradual shift from relatively self contained labour markets – but less than in the rest of England.
  • In almost every area, male flows exceed female as a proportion of the respective working populations.
  • The greatest volumes and ratios of commuting are found amongst managers, senior officials, professional workers, and their associate and technical occupations.
  • Tees Valley shows the highest proportions of part-time work and County Durham the lowest. NB part-time work is traditionally associated with females.
executive summary 2
Executive summary (2)
  • The greener forms of travel have failed to advance in importance, and stand at low levels. Use of foot, bicycle and bus modes appears to have declined (together with the motor cycle); cycling is below national averages, with only 1.7 percent of work journeys.
  • Number of cars owned increased by 28% in this time, compared to 21% increase in number of journeys between districts
  • The proportions travelling by public transport, at 14.8 percent, are slightly lower than in England and Wales and weighted more to the bus than the train.
  • Newcastle upon Tyne is the more dependent on public transport (27% of journeys) as to a smaller degree are Durham City and Middlesbrough. The smallest dependence on the bus is shown in the most rural areas.
  • There was an increase of 28 percent in workers travelling into Tyne and Wear (from 64,500 to 82,600).
concluding facts
Concluding facts
  • Proportion of journeys to work by car or van has increased by five percentage points between 1991 and 2001
  • Proportion of people who use public transport to travel to work decreased by four percentage points between 1991 and 2001
  • The proportion of people who travel more than 20 miles to work has increased by two percentage points between 1991 and 2001
find the report at
Find the report at…..

www.nerip.com

and click on ‘reports and briefings’