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Pp. A Training Programme addressing attitudes of staff delivering financial services to the rural poor in India: design & evaluation. [Poster presented by Dr Marylin Williams, University of Reading,UK]. 1. ISSUES & BACKGROUND. 3. TRAINING DESIGN & IMPLEMENTATION. THE ISSUES

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slide1
Pp

A Training Programme addressing attitudes of staff delivering financial services to the rural poor in India: design & evaluation

[Poster presented by Dr Marylin Williams, University of Reading,UK]

1. ISSUES & BACKGROUND

3. TRAINING DESIGN & IMPLEMENTATION

THE ISSUES

  • Whilearound 50% cultivator households in India are indebted, only 27% of debt is sourced from formal sector
  • Yet there are over 44,000 rural & semi-urban bank branches, offering the potential to improve financial inclusion
  • Possibility that barriers to effective outreach arise from ‘attitudinal’ factors was investigated in earlier project

BACKGROUND: The Earlier Project

(Jones et al, 2003, funded by DFID)*

  • 60 BMs in Datia, Betul & Indore districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) interviewed re their perceptions of:

clients/rural context

their organization (bank)

selves (goals, resources, risks)

  • quantitative & qualitative analyses revealed negative attitudes
  • BMs with more training were less negative
  • Training identified as means of promoting innovation & encouraging positive attitudes

4. EVALUATIONS

TRAINING

  • positive concurrent evaluations by trainees & trainers

ATTITUDE CHANGE

  • pre- & post- training attitude measures (developed via earlier Project)

demonstrated significant positive attitude change.

OUTCOME EVALUATION

  • visits to bank branches 2½ - 3 months after training by C.P.Mohan &

A. Sharrma (CAB), & UoR interviewers

  • 12 accessible & representative branches chosen
  • semi-structured interviews in each location with branch manager (BM),

bank staff group, individual clients & bank-linked SHGs

  • barriers to achieving action plans included lack of resources (staff &

time), language, NPAs & environment/infrastructure, but:

  • all BMs had increased confidence, & majority evidenced more positive

attitude & behaviour towards poor clients & increased empowering of

bank staff

  • new initiatives were under way, including lending for new activities;

client base was expanding

SUSTAINABILITY

  • training programme successful due to being demand-led, innovative in

content & style, balanced in attention on the individual as well as on

collective issues, & supported by senior banking officials; it is now

mainstreamed within CAB

FUNDED BY DFID/EDIF

CONDUCTED BY:

University of Reading (UoR):

School of Agriculture, Policy & Development

(Dr Howard Jones & Esse Nilsson)

School of Psychology & Clinical Language Sciences

( Dr Marylin Williams)

& Reserve Bank of India (RBI) (Dr Yashwant Thorat)

IN COLLABORATION WITH:

College of Agricultural Banking (CAB);

CARE, India;

All India Women’s Conference;

Confederation of Indian Industry;

Bank of India (BoI); Central Bank of India (CBI)

……………………………………………..

*Ref:Jones,JHM, Williams,MJ, Thorat,YT & Thorat,A (2003) Attitudes of Rural Branch Managers in Madhya Pradesh, India, toward their Role as Providers of Financial Services to the Poor. Journal of Microfinance, 5, 2, 139-167

2. IDENTIFYING TRAINING NEEDS

  • BASELINE SURVEYS
  • Conducted with & by collaborators, to examine:
  • existing training provision & materials

(informed by banks - staff, trainers, training

institutes, & non- financial companies)

  • bank services (informed by individual

clients & SHGs)

  • AREAS OF TRAINING NEED IDENTIFIED
  • problem-solving in rural context

(eg re rural lending)

  • social skills development
  • development of positive attitudes to

selves, organization & poor clients

  • participatory & innovative training methods
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