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Biodiversity

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  1. Biodiversity

  2. Outline • Biodiversity and the Species Concept • Varied Definitions • Benefits of Biodiversity • Threats to Biodiversity • Natural and Human Caused Reductions • Endangered Species Management • ESA • CITES • Captive Breeding

  3. BIODIVERSITY AND THE SPECIES CONCEPT • What is Biodiversity ? • Genetic Diversity - Measures variety of different versions of same genes. • Species Diversity - Measures number of different kinds of organisms within a community. • Ecological Diversity - Measures richness and complexity of a community.

  4. What is Biodiversity ? • Species Diversity • Species Richness - Total number of species in a community. • Species Evenness - Relative abundance of individuals within each species.

  5. What Are Species ? • Species Definition • Reproductive Isolation • Genetic Species Concept • DNA sequencing • Evolutionary Species Concept • Pluralistic Species Concept

  6. How Many Species Are There ? • Currently 1.7 million species identified. • Estimates range between 3-50 million. • May be 30 million insect species. • Invertebrates make up 70% of all known species, and probably most of yet to be discovered species. • Tropical rainforests and coral reefs are biodiversity hotspots. • NA and Europe only contain 10-15%.

  7. Biodiversity Hotspots

  8. BENEFITS OF BIODIVERSITY • Food • As many as 80,000 edible wild plant species could be utilized by humans. • Drugs and Medicines • More than half of all prescriptions contain some natural product. • Pharmaceutical companies actively prospect tropical countries for products.

  9. Benefits of Biodiversity • Ecological Benefits • Soil formation, waste disposal, air and water purification, nutrient cycling, solar energy absorption, and biogeochemical and hydrological cycles all depend on biodiversity. • Can a system function without all its integral parts ?

  10. Benefits of Biodiversity • Aesthetic and Cultural Benefits • Cultural diversity inextricably linked to biodiversity. • USFWS estimates Americans spend $104 billion annually on wildlife-related recreation. • Ecotourism can be an important form of sustainable economic development. • Existence (intrinsic) value.

  11. THREATS TO BIODIVERSITY • Extinction - Elimination of a species. • Natural Causes • In undisturbed ecosystems, background rate appears to be one species per decade. • In this century, human impacts have accelerated that rate, causing perhaps hundreds to thousands of extinctions annually.

  12. Natural Causes of Extinction • Fossil record suggests more than 99% of all species ever in existence are now extinct. • Most went extinct before humans arrived. • End of Cretaceous - Dinosaurs and 50% of existing genera disappeared. • Permian period - Two-thirds of all marine species and nearly half of all plant and animal families died out.

  13. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity • Habitat Destruction • Biggest reason for current increase in extinction is habitat loss. • Habitat fragmentation divides populations into isolated groups vulnerable to catastrophic events. • Northern Spotted Owl

  14. Habitat Fragmentation

  15. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity • Invasive Species • Invasive (exotic) organisms thrive in new territory where they are free of usual predators, diseases, or resource limitations that limited them in original habitat. • Over past 300 years, approximately 50,000 non-native species have become established in the U.S.. • At least 4,500 are free-living. • 15% cause environmental damage.

  16. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity • Invasive Species • Eurasian milfoil • European green crab • Cheatgrass • Water hyacinth • Kudzu vine • Asian tiger mosquitoes • Purple loosestrife • Zebra muscles

  17. Invasive Species

  18. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity • Pollution • Pesticides • Lead • Population • Human population growth • Resource Use • Overharvesting • American Passenger Pigeon • Whales

  19. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity • Commercial Products and Live Specimens • Wildlife smuggling is very profitable. • Leopard fur / Rhinoceros horns • U.S. Annual pet trade in wild species: • 2 million reptiles • 1 million amphibians and mammals • 500,000 birds • 128,000,000 tropical fish • Cyanide released above coral reefs.

  20. Human-Caused Reductions in Biodiversity

  21. Predator and Pest Control • Many animal populations have been greatly reduced or exterminated because they are regarded as dangerous to humans or livestock. • Animal control costs $20 million in federal and state funds annually. • 700,000 birds and mammals annually. • 100,000 coyotes

  22. ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT • Hunting and Fishing Laws • By 1890’s, most states had enacted some hunting and fishing laws. • General idea was pragmatic, not aesthetic or moral preservation. • In general, regulations have been extremely successful.

  23. Endangered Species Act • Established in 1973. • Endangered are those considered in imminent danger of extinction. • Threatened are those likely to become endangered, at least locally, in the near future. • Vulnerable are those that are naturally rare or have been locally depleted to a level that puts them at risk.

  24. Endangered Species Act • ESA regulates a wide range of activities involving endangered species: • Taking (harassing, harming, pursuing, hunting, shooting, killing, capturing, or collecting) either accidentally, or on purpose. • Selling • Importing into or Exporting out of the U.S. • Possessing • Transporting or Shipping

  25. Endangered Species Act • Currently, U.S. has 1,300 species on its Endangered and Threatened lists, and about 250 candidate species waiting for consideration. • Number reflects more about human interests than actual status. • Invertebrates make up 75% of all species, but only 9% of T/E list. • Listing process is extremely slow.

  26. Recovery Plans • Once a species is listed, USFWS is required to propose a recovery plan detailing the rebuilding of the species to sustainable levels. • Total cost of all current plans = $5 billion. • Some have been very successful. • Opponents have continually tried to require economic costs and benefits be incorporated into planning.

  27. Private Land and Critical Habitat • Eighty percent of habitat for more than half of all listed species is on non-public property. • Supreme Court has ruled destroying habitat equates to taking. • USFWS has been negotiating Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) with private landowners. • Landowners allowed to harvest resources as long as species benefit.

  28. Reauthorizing ESA • ESA officially expired in 1992. • Proposals for new ESA generally fall into two general categories: • Versions that encourage ecosystem and habitat protection rather than individual species. • Safe harbor policies that allow exceptions to critical habitat designations. • (Economic Considerations)

  29. Habitat Protection • Latest management strategy is preservation of ecosystems supporting maximum biological diversity rather than species-by-species approach. • Gap Analysis - Conservationists and wildlife managers look for unprotected landscapes that are rich in species. • Broad-scale, holistic approach.

  30. International Wildlife Treaties • Convention on International Trade In Endangered Species (CITES) - 1975. • Regulated trade in living specimens and products derived from listed species.

  31. CAPTIVE BREEDING • Breeding programs in zoos and botanical gardens are one method of saving threatened species. • Repositories of genetic diversity. • Most mammals in NA zoos are now produced from captive-breeding programs. • Some zoos now participating in reintroduction programs.

  32. Captive Breeding • Zoos have limited space for captive breeding. • How many can / should we save ? • Ultimate problem is that natural habitat may disappear while we are conserving the species itself. • Another alternative is to attempt to save species in the wild. • Provide funding for protection in native habitats.

  33. Summary • Biodiversity and the Species Concept • Varied Definitions • Benefits of Biodiversity • Threats to Biodiversity • Natural and Human Caused Reductions • Endangered Species Management • ESA • CITES • Captive Breeding