Monday, January 5, 2015 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Monday, January 5, 2015

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  1. Monday, January 5, 2015 Who found out the moon phase? It’s a FULL MOON 8:10 – 8:40

  2. SCIENCE TIME 8:40 – 9:20

  3. Newton’s Laws of Motion I. Law of Inertia II. F=ma III. Action-Reaction

  4. Newton’s Laws of Motion • 1st Law– An object at rest will stay at rest, and an object in motion will stay in motionat constant velocity, unless acted upon by an unbalanced force. • 2nd Law– Force equals mass times acceleration (F = ma). • 3rd Law– For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

  5. 1st Law of Motion (Law of Inertia) An object at rest will stay at rest, and an object in motion will stay in motion at constant velocity, unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

  6. Objects tend to resist a change in motion. This is called:Inertia

  7. 1st Law(Law of Inertia) • Inertia is the tendency of an object to resist changes in its velocity: whether in motion or motionless. These pumpkins will not move unless acted on by an unbalanced force.

  8. 1st Law • Once airborne, unless acted on by an unbalanced force (gravity and air – fluid friction), it would never stop!

  9. 1st Law • Unless acted upon by an unbalanced force, this golf ball would sit on the tee forever.

  10. Why then, do we observe every day objects in motion slowing down and becoming motionless seemingly without an outside force? It’s a force we sometimes cannot see – friction.

  11. Objects on earth, unlike the frictionless space the moon travels through, are under the influence of friction.

  12. What is this unbalanced force that acts on an object in motion? Friction! • There are four main types of friction: • Sliding friction: ice skating • Rolling friction: bowling • Fluid friction (air or liquid): air or water resistance • Static friction: initial friction when moving an object

  13. Slide a book across a table and watch it slide to a rest position. The book comes to a rest because of the presence of a force - that force being the force of friction - which brings the book to a rest position.

  14. In the absence of a force of friction, the book would continue in motion with the same speed and direction - forever! (Or at least to the end of the table top.)

  15. Newtons’s 1st Law and You Don’t let this be you. Wear seat belts. Because of inertia, objects (including you) resist changes in their motion. When the car going 80 km/hour is stopped by the brick wall, your body keeps moving at 80 m/hour. http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/forces-and-motion/inertia.htm

  16. Paired Partners Newton’s First Law handout 9:00 – 9:20

  17. Homework Pages 40-43

  18. Restroom Break 9:20 – 9:30

  19. Math Time! New Workbook! http://connected.mcgraw-hill.com/c2j/dashboard.do?bookId=PMJ9CKMO2Q7DDOXZZTS1YO3HG4 9:30 – 10:55

  20. Chapter 8 – Am I Ready? P543-544

  21. Math Stash! – Vocabulary to Know

  22. Math Stash! – Vocabulary to Know

  23. MOVE TO LEARN http://www.movetolearnms.org/how-do-i-do-it/fitness-videos-4-6/cranium-corral/ 10:55 – 11:00

  24. Language Arts/ Reading 11:00 – 12:00

  25. Let’s Practice Our Reading Strategies 11:00 – 11:10

  26. Unit 4 – Inventive Thinking Spotlight on: Leonardo da Vinci Invented the anemometer - a device used for measuring wind speed, and is a common weather station instrument. Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci was an Italian Renaissance polymath: painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer.Wikipedia Born:April 15, 1452,Vinci, Italy Died:May 2, 1519,Amboise, France Period:High Renaissance Buried:Chapel of Saint-Hubert 11:10 – 11:15

  27. Paired Partners 11:15 – 11:30

  28. INDEPENDENT READING 11:30 – 12:00

  29. Out of Classroom! • 12:00 – 12:45 Activity • 12:45 – 1:15 Lunch • 1:15 – 1:45 Recess

  30. Writing Time! Writing Performance Task Standard W3: Narrative Being a Writer 1:45 – 2:40

  31. At the end of the school year you will be completing a reading and writing assignment called a performance task. The purpose for this is to show how well you are developing and growing as readers and writers. It’s time to randomly assign partners for our next task! (Remember, a task is a job that needs to be completed.) Now, get your pencil and pair up!

  32. Do you remember the personal narrative and fictional narrative that you worked on previously? • Remember another word for narrative is story, One of the writing tasks you will do at the end of the year is a narrative. This week we will learn strategies for doing well on the narrative writing portion of the performance task.

  33. Narrative Writing Let’s record your responses to the following questions on a chart titled: “What We Have Learned About Narrative Writing” • What have you learned about good narrative, or fiction, writing? • What did you do to make your narrative piece interesting and easy to read?

  34. Does our chart include the following? What We Have Learned About Narrative Writing • Begins with an opening that makes the reader want to keep reading (a hook) • Includes interesting characters and events • Describes the setting of the story • Has a chronological sequence of events • Sometimes includes dialogue • Stays focused and makes sense • Uses sensory details • Establishes a point of view • Follows writing rules for spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar Let’s be sure to refer back to this as we prepare for our narrative writing performance task.

  35. Performance Task Topic through a map, video, and eventually a brochure! • I will use guided practice to help you learn about a topic so you will be able to answer research questions and write stories about the topic. • Today, you will learn and then write about some of the monuments and memorials you might see if you took an imaginary trip to our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C. • The sources will focus on the major monuments and memorials in an area called the National Mall and the nearby Tidal Basin.

  36. Monument and Memorial • Monument – something that is built in memory of a person or event • Memorial – something that keeps memories alive • A monument is also a type of memorial. The Washington Monument is a memorial built to help us remember and honor George Washington.

  37. First Source – Map of Washington, D.C. • This map shows the monuments and memorials of the National Mall and Tidal Basin. • Let’s look at the “National Mall and Memorial Parks” chart

  38. First Source – Map of Washington, D.C. • Now, your turn to look at your own copy of the map • Let’s look at the Lincoln Memorial on the west (left) side of the map.

  39. First Source – Map of Washington, D.C. study continued • Notice that the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool, the World War II Memorial, and the Washington Monument are located to the east (right) of the Lincoln Memorial. • Notice the Tidal Basin and the monuments around it (Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, and the Thomas Jefferson Memorial.) What questions do you have about the map of Washington D.C.?

  40. Video Time • Now, you will watch a video called “Lincoln Memorial” • In this video, a ranger shares some of the thoughts and feelings he had the first time he visited the Lincoln Memorial, and he also describes details about the memorial • I will play the video, but I will be stopping it three times. At each stop, you will talk with your partner about what you learned. http://teach.devstu.org/content/index/25232?idPav=280

  41. Video Stop 1 • Stop at 1:27 “…because everything is not right there in front of you. You have to search for a few things.” • What did you learn about the Lincoln Memorial in the portion you just saw? Turn and talk!

  42. Video Stop 2 • Stop at 2:50 “It’s almost as if tat open hand is there to shake the hand of the South.” • What did you learn about the Lincoln Memorial in this portion you just saw? Turn and talk!

  43. Video Stop 3 • Stop at 4:05 “…and it makes perfect sense for him to be seated upon our American flag.” • What did you learn about the Lincoln Memorial in this portion you just saw? Turn and talk!

  44. Note Taking Time • We’ll watch the video again, but as a class and in pairs, you will complete the graphic organizer (note-taking chart), to take notes on what you are learning about the Lincoln Memorial. • In the left-hand column write Lincoln Memorial and underline it • You will list details and descriptions of the memorial below the name of the memorial or monument. • In the right-hand column you will write any thoughts or feelings you might have if you were to visit the memorial. This will be useful when you plan and write your narrative (story) about visiting the monuments of Washington, D.C.

  45. We will follow the same procedure as the first time we watched the video. Stop 1 • Stop at 1:27 “…because everything is not right there in front of you. You have to search for a few things.” • What did you learn about the Lincoln Memorial in the portion you just saw? Reflect and Write!