Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid for a Healthy Lifestyle - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid for a Healthy Lifestyle

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  1. Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramidfor a Healthy Lifestyle

  2. History of USDA’s Food Guidance Food for Young Children 1992 1916 1940s 1970s 2005 1950s-1960s

  3. One Size Does Not Fit All! • USDA created 12 pyramids for 12 calorie levels, from 1,000 to 3,200. • Calorie levels are based on: • Gender • Age • Activity

  4. MyPyramid recommends total amounts rather than “servings” MyPyramid gives more specific guidelines about the types and AMOUNTS of foods to eat than previous Food Guide Pyramid. It places more emphasis on physical activity.

  5. Servings Daily Amounts in cups or ounces

  6. Three Key Messages • Make smart choices within and among the food groups. • Keep a balance between food intake and physical activity. • Get the most nutrients from your calories.

  7. Food Groups are Color Coded

  8. Key food group messages from the Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid: Focus on fruits. Vary your veggies. Get your calcium-rich foods. Make half your grains whole. Go lean with protein. Know the limits on fats, salt, and sugars.

  9. What Does the PyramidTeach Us? • Activity • Variety • Moderation • Proportionality • Personalization • Gradual Improvement

  10. Physical Activity

  11. Be Active! ACTIVITY Represented by the steps and the person climbing them.

  12. Balance food calories with physical activity level

  13. Physical activity recommended for MOST days of week • Adult recommendations vary by goal: • Reduce risk of chronic disease:30 minutes of moderate intensity • Manage weight and preventweight gain: 60 minutes ofmoderate to vigorous activity • Sustain a weight loss: 60 to 90minutes of moderate to vigorous activity • Children and teens: 60 minutes

  14. Walking briskly (about 3½ miles per hour) Gardening/yard work Hiking Golf (walking and carrying clubs) Weight training (general light workout) Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour) Dancing Moderate physical activities include:

  15. Aerobics Heavy yard work, such as chopping wood Swimming (freestyle laps) Basketball (competitive) Running,jogging (5 miles per hour) Bicycling (more than 10 miles per hour) Weight lifting (vigorous effort) Walking very fast (4½ miles per hour) Vigorous physical activities include:

  16. My Daily Activity Plan DAILY GOAL: 60 min Team sport in gym class or after school – 30 minutes Stretch and/or lift weights while watching TV – 20 minutes Walk the dog – 10 minutes

  17. Eat a Varied Diet! • VARIETY The six color bands represent the five food groups, plus oils. Foods from all groups are needed daily. Grains Vegetables Fruit OILS Milk Meat & Beans

  18. Food Groups

  19. Whole Grains • Whole-wheat flour • Bulgur (cracked wheat) • Oatmeal • Whole cornmeal • Brown rice • Kasha (buckwheat grouts)

  20. Make Half Your Grains Whole • Check ingredient lists on labels. • Look at dietary fiber on Nutrition Facts panel. If it provides at least 2.5 grams of fiber per serving it’s a good source of fiber. • Make gradual changes … build up to 100% whole grain breads and cereals. • Be adventurous and try bulgur, kasha, and other grains. • Add whole grains to mixed dishes.

  21. Make Half Your Grains Whole • “Multi-grain" only means that the product contains more than one grain. • "Stone-ground" is a technique for grinding grains. • Molasses or food coloring are sometimes added to make white bread look brown. • “Wheat" only means the product is made with wheat. Look for the word "whole”.

  22. Grains: Recommended Intakes • Children • 4 to 8 years: 5 to 6 oz equivalents • Females • 9 to 13 years: 5 oz equivalents • 14 to 18 years: 6 oz equivalents • Males • 9 to 13 years: 6 oz equivalents • 14 to 18 years: 7 oz equivalents These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values.

  23. Vary Your Veggies • Dark green vegetables • Orange vegetables • Legumes • Starchy vegetables • Other vegetables

  24. Vary Your Veggies • Buy fresh veggies in season. • Use more fresh or frozen, less canned (except low sodium). • Have cut veggies available for snacks. • Have salad with dinner every night. • Add veggies to casseroles, pasta sauce, quick breads, etc. • Select fast food salad rather than fries, at least sometimes. • Choose dark salad greens over iceberg.

  25. Vegetables:Recommended Intakes • Children • 4 to 8 years: 1½ cups • Females • 9 to 13 years: 2 cups • 14 to 18 years: 2½ cups • Males • 9 to 13 years: 2½ cups • 14 to 18 years: 3 cups These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values.

  26. Focus on Fruits • Use fruits in salads, side dishes,main dishes, desserts, and for snacks. • Keep fresh and dried fruit handy for snacks. • Cut up fruit on cereal, pancakes, and waffles. • Include canned and frozen fruits. • Buy in season. • Be adventurous and try unusual fruits. • Choose fruit more often than juice. • Limit juice to about 6 ounces a day.

  27. Fruits:Recommended Intakes • Children • 4 to 8 years: 1½ cups • Females • 9 to 18 years: 1½ cups • Males • 9 to 13 years: 1½ cups • 14 to 18 years: 2 cups These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values.

  28. Get Your Calcium Rich Foods • Focus on fat-free or low-fat milk. • Drink fat-free or low-fat milk with meals and snacks. • Choose low-fat cheeses. • Use milk to make hot cereals. • Have low-fat yogurt as a snack. • Use lactose-free products if needed. • Select non-dairy high-calcium foods and beverages if desired

  29. Milk:Recommended Intake • Children 2 to 8 years: 2 cups milk or equivalent • Young people 9 to 18 years: 3 cups milk or equivalent. These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values.

  30. Go Lean With Protein • Select leanest cuts of meat. • Trim all fat and remove skin from poultry. • Prepare with no added fat. • Choose lean luncheon meats. • Eat beans as main dishes. • Eat fatty fish in moderation. • Include nuts in snacks, salads, and main dishes.

  31. Meat and Beans:Recommended Intakes • Children • 4 to 8 years: 3 to 4 ounce equivalents • Females • 9 to 18 years: 5 oz equivalents • Males • 9 to 13 years: 5 oz equivalents • 14 to 18 years: 6 oz equivalents These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values

  32. Oils: Tips for Healthy Choices • Use vegetable oils and soft margarine rather than solid fats. • Substitute nuts for meat or cheese as snack or in a meal sometimes. • Use Nutrition Facts to select foods low in saturated fat, trans fat and cholesterol. • Select foods prepared with little or no fat. • Select lean or low-fat foods most often.

  33. Oils: Recommended Intakes • Children • 4 to 8 years: 4 teaspoons • Females • 9 to 18 years: 5 teaspoons • Males • 9 to 13 years: 5 teaspoons • 14 to 18 years: 6 teaspoons These values are for young people at a healthy weight, who are physically active less than 30 minutes a day. See Food Intake Pattern Calorie Levels chart for more specific values.

  34. Select Foods for Best Nutrition MODERATION Each food group narrows toward the top: Base: foods with little or no solid fats or added sugars. Top: foods with more added sugars and/or solid fats.

  35. Where do these foods fit?

  36. Eat Recommended Amount from Each Food Group PROPORTIONALITY The food group bands have different widths - a general guide to the proportion to eat from each group.

  37. Make It Your Pyramid! PERSONALIZATION The person on the steps, the URL, and the slogan, stress finding the amount of foods YOU need daily.

  38. Take It One Step At A Time GRADUAL IMPROVEMENT Suggested by the slogan. Take small steps each day to improve your diet and lifestyle.

  39. Discretionary Calories May be used to: • Increase amount of food selected from a food group • Consume foods that are not in the lowest fat form—such as 2% milk or medium-fat meat or items that contain added sugars • Add oil, fat, or sugar to foods • Consume alcohol (for those who consume alcohol)

  40. “Discretionary calories” Depending on the foods you choose, you may be able to spend more calories than the amount required to meet your nutrient needs.  These calories are the “extras” that can be used on luxuries like solid fats, added sugars or on more food from any food group. They are your “discretionary calories.”

  41. MyPyramid “discretionary calories”

  42. Using MyPyramid