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About e-Business W@tch Introduction: The European e-Business W@tch A cornerstone: the e-Business Survey 2005 A cornerstone of the monitoring activities are representative surveys among decision-makers in European enterprises about their use of e-business.

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introduction the european e business w@tch

About e-Business W@tch

Introduction: The European e-Business W@tch

A cornerstone: the e-Business Survey 2005

A cornerstone of the monitoring activities are representative surveys among decision-makers in European enterprises about their use of e-business.

The latest survey was conducted in January and February 2005. This Chart Report presents main results of the 2005 survey.

Further information:

e-Business W@tch European Commission

c/o empirica GmbH DG Enterprise & Industry Oxfordstr. 2, 53111 Bonn BE-1049 Brussels Germany Belgium

Fax: (49-228) 98530-12 Fax: (32-2) 2967019

info@ebusiness-watch.orgentr-innov-ict-ebiz@cec.eu.int

An e-Business Observatory since 2002

Information and communication technologies (ICT) are changing the way in which companies trade with their suppliers and customers.

e-Business W@tch monitors related developments and analyses their impacts on different sectors of the European economy. Special emphasis is placed on the implications for SMEs.

The initiative was launched by the European Commission, DG Enterprise and Industry, in late 2001. It will be operational until November 2005, with a possible extension until the end of 2006.

In 2004/05, studies by the e-Business W@tch covered 10 sectors, with a focus on manufacturing.

summary electronic trade in the eu in 2005 i

Summary

Summary: Electronic Trade in the EU in 2005 (I)

Dynamic development of electronic procurement

Firms accounting for more than 50% of employment from the 10 sectors studied made online purchases in 2005. In 2003 (with a different set of sectors), this figure was 46%.

However, only 27% say that these online purchases account for more than 5% of the total volume of their supplies.

19% of firms use special ICT systems to support their e-procurement processes. This indicates that electronic sourcing and procurement play an important role in these firms. Most companies have implemented standardised software packages, or use customised solutions.

Chart: Companies making online purchases by sector. (Read: "Firms representing x% of employment buy online.")

summary electronic trade in the eu in 2005 ii

Summary

Summary: Electronic Trade in the EU in 2005 (II)

Online marketing and sales: 17% enable customers to order goods online

B2C electronic commerce developments are difficult to track with representative surveys. The percentage of firms who sell goods or services online appears to be little changed: 17% in 2005, 16% in 2003 (by employment).

However, the impact of the internet on marketing and sales processes in sectors such as tourism, publishing and IT services is uncontested.

Use of special ICT systems for e-commerce

The use of special ICT systems for electronic marketing and sales is at a similar level (17%) to the use of such systems for e-procurement. Companies that have such ICT systems tend to use them for a variety of functions, such as

publishing offers to customers, answering RfQs / RfPs (requests for quotations / prices), receiving orders from customers, and for billing and invoicing.

Firms from the publishing, IT services and tourism industries are the most likely to offer customers online payment.

Outlook on expected developments

Even if requirements for marketing and sales are quite different in B2B oriented manufacturing sectors, trade between companies will increasingly become web-based. This will be a gradual development, but the evidence is already there.

For instance, there is a clear trend to digitise invoicing and payment processes in B2B and B2G transactions.

summary sectoral disparities in e business

Summary

Summary: Sectoral disparities in e-business

The intensity of electronic business differs widely between sectors, particularly between manufacturing and service sectors. The IT services industry is the notable exception to this rule.

e-Business Index (2005) for sectors

Blue chart (left side):

Benchmark based on firm-weighted data (= in % of firms)

Green chart (right side):

Benchmark based on employment-weighted data (= firms representing x% of employment in a sector)

summary geographic disparities in e business

Summary

Summary: Geographic disparities in e-business

Surveys of domestic ICT use still find considerable gaps in ICT diffusion between different countries. In the context of business, the situation is much more complex. The structure of an industry can differ significantly between countries, and this has implications on e-business benchmarks. In Italy, for example, sectors dominated by small firms are more prevalent than in other countries. Since large firms are more advanced in e-business, certain benchmarks may suggest a lower level of ICT use (see below).

e-Business Index (2005) for countries

Blue chart (left side):

Benchmark based on firm-weighted data(= in % of firms)

Green chart (right side):

Benchmark based on employment-weighted data (= firms representing x% of employment in a country)

a 1 internet access

A. Basic ICT Infrastructure

A.1: Internet access

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: C2: "Does your

company have access to the Internet?"

C5: “What is the maximum bandwidth

of your company’s connection

to the Internet?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

a 2 companies with a local area network lan

A. Basic ICT Infrastructure

A.2: Companies with a Local Area Network (LAN)

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: C6a: "Does your

company use a Local Area Network (LAN)?“

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

a 3 companies using a virtual private network vpn

A. Basic ICT Infrastructure

A.3: Companies using a Virtual Private Network (VPN)

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: C6d: "Does your

company use a Virtual

Private Network (VPN)?“

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

a 4 companies enabling remote access to their network

A. Basic ICT Infrastructure

A.4: Companies enabling remote access to their network

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: C8: “Can employees of

your company access your computer

system remotely from outside the

company, for instance from home from

a hotel or while travelling?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

b 1 companies using an intranet

B. Internal e-applications

B.1: Companies using an Intranet

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: E1a: "Do you use

an Intranet?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

b 2 companies using erp systems

B. Internal e-applications

B.2: Companies using ERP systems

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: E1d: “Do you use

an ERP system?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

b 3 companies using online technology to track working hours and or production time

B. Internal e-applications

B.3: Companies using online technology to track working hours and/or production time

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: E2b: "Do you use online

applications other than e-mail to track

working hours and production time?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

b 4 companies using e learning applications

B. Internal e-applications

B.4: Companies using e-learning applications

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: E3: “Does your company

use e-learning applications, that is for

instance learning material for employees

available on the Intranet or on the Internet?“

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

c 1 companies buying supplies online

C. Supplier-facing activities

C.1: Companies buying supplies online

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: F1: "Does your

company use the Internet or other

computer-mediated networks to purchase

goods or services online?"

F4: “Please estimate how large a share of

your total purchases is conducted online.”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

c 2 companies buying specific it solutions to support procurement processes

C. Supplier-facing activities

C.2: Companies buying specific IT solutions to support procurement processes

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: F6: "Does your company

currently support the selection of suppliers

or procurement processes by specific

IT solutions?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

c 3 companies billing invoices from suppliers

C. Supplier-facing activities

C.3: Companies billing invoices from suppliers

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all firms that support procurement

processes by specific ICT solutions. N=784.

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: F7e: "Do you use IT

solutions for billing invoices from

suppliers?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

c 4 companies using a scm system

C. Supplier-facing activities

C.4: Companies using a SCM system

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: E1e: "Do you use an

SCM system, that is a Supply Chain

Management system?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

d 1 companies with a website use of content management systems cms

D. Marketing & sales

D.1: Companies with a website/use of Content Management Systems (CMS)

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: G1: "Does your

company have its own website on the

Internet?"

G2: “Does your company make

use of a content management system,

that is special software for maintaining

and updating the website?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

d 2 companies using a crm system

D. Marketing & sales

D.2: Companies using a CRM system

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: G11: "Does your

company use a CRM system, that is a

software for customer relationship

management?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

d 3 companies selling goods services online

D. Marketing & sales

D.3: Companies selling goods/services online

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: G3: "Does your

company sell goods or services online on

the Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?"

G5: “Please estimate how large a share of

your total sales is conducted online.”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

d 4 companies using specific it solutions to support sales processes

D. Marketing & sales

D.4: Companies using specific IT solutions to support sales processes

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: G7: "Does your company

support marketing or sales processes by

specific IT solutions?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

e 1 companies using edi based standards

E. e-Standards & interoperability

E.1: Companies using EDI based standards

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: H1a: "Do you use EDI-

based standards, for example EDIFACT,

EANCOM, ANSI X12 or TRADACOM?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

n.a.

e 2 companies using xml based standards

E. e-Standards & interoperability

E.2: Companies using XML based standards

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: H1b: "Do you use XML-

based standards such as cXML, UBL,

RosettaNet, xCBL?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

n.a.

e 3 companies using proprietary based standards

E. e-Standards & interoperability

E.3: Companies using proprietary based standards

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: H1d: "Do you use

proprietary standards agreed between you

and your business partners?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

n.a.

e 4 companies using open source software in operating systems and or databases

E. e-Standards & interoperability

E.4: Companies using Open Source Software in operating systems and/or databases

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: H7a: "Does your

company use Open Source operating

systems like Linux?"

H7b: "Does your company use Open

Source databases like mySQL?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

n.a.

f 1 companies that have outsourced it services

F. IT-skills & ICT security

F.1: Companies that have outsourced IT services

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: D5: "Has your company

outsourced ICT services to external service

providers in any of the following application

areas: maintenance of hardware and

networks, web-hosting or data storage

services, software development, software

application hosting, call centre services or

other ICT services?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

f 2 companies with regular ict training schemes for employees

F. IT-skills & ICT security

F.2: Companies with regular ICT training schemes for employees

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: D4: "Does your company

regularly send employees to ICT training

programmes?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

f 3 companies having experienced damages because of ict security incidents

F. IT-skills & ICT security

F.3: Companies having experienced damages because of ICT security incidents

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: D11: "During the past 12

months, have any of the following incidents

had an significant impact on your business:

hardware failure, software failure, etc.

(see tables left hand side)?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

f 4 companies having installed ict security measures

F. IT-skills & ICT security

F.4: Companies having installed ICT security measures

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey question: D12: "Do you have/ use

a firewall, secure server technology,

company rules relating to encryption of

data, etc. (see tables left hand side)?"

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

g 1 ict enabled product services innovation

G. Innovation activity

G.1: ICT enabled product/services innovation

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: B1: "During the past 12

months, has your company launched any

new or substantially improved products or

services?"

B2: “Have any of these product innovations

been directly related to orenabled by

information or communication technology?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

g 2 ict enabled process innovation

G. Innovation activity

G.2: ICT enabled process innovation

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Total number, sectors,

countries are weighted by employment

(= enterprises comprising …%

of employment in sector / country).

Figures for size-bands in %

of enterprises from the size-band.

Survey questions: B3: "During the past 12

months, has your company introduced any

new or significantly improved internal

processes?"

B4: “Have any of these process innovations

been directly related to or enabled by

information or communication technology?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

e business profile the food and beverage industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The food and beverage industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Green diamond = relative e-business intensity in the food and beverages sector

Companies from the food and beverages industry are confronted with several business challenges where ICT could play an important role in the future.

This includes control over raw material supply, quality assurance, and an increasing demand for new and diversified products.

Production in the F&B industry is characterized by small batch processes that are hard to consolidate and integrate. Despite high investments in plant automation, many operations are still labour intensive or only partially automated. However, e-business applications could rise in importance.

e business profile the textile and clothing industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The textile and clothing industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-businessintensity in the textile and clothingindustry

Among large companies from the textile and clothing industry, e-business activity has increased. However, the economic crisis in the sector hampers innovation among small firms.

New evidence compared to the earlier survey of 2003 shows: there are signs that the use of advanced ICT systems in large textile companies is quite in line with adoption rates among large companies from the most advanced manufacturing sectors.

Examples are Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Supply Chain Management (SCM) systems.

In marketing and sales, though, e-business has not yet a significant role.

e business profile the publishing and printing industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The publishing and printing industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-businessintensity in the publishing andprinting industry

The European publishing and printing industry is in a state of flux. ICT, and in particular the internet, have had a profound impact on business activities.

This has had an effect on practically all areas of business activity, most importantly internal work and production processes, the products themselves, the distribution of products, marketing strategies and interfaces between companies and their customers in general.

Digital technology is a key driver of innovation in this industry, as practically all solutions are becoming digitally integrated.

e business profile the pharmaceutical industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The pharmaceutical industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the pharmaceuticalindustry

The pharmaceutical industry is well suited to the use of ICT and e-business applications. This is true for both internal processes and for the support of B2B relationships.

In fact, the pharmaceutical industry is an intensive user of electronic business: ICT and internet-based solutions play a key role in supporting marketing and sales processes in the pharmaceutical industry.

CRM (customer relation management) systems and mobile solutions have a high potential for facilitating the work of the pharmaceutical sales force.

In B2B trading, the structure of internet trading platforms is comparatively well suited.

e business profile the machinery and equipment industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The machinery and equipment industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the machinery andequipment industry

Companies in the machinery and equipment (M&E) sector are moving from the endowment with basic ICT equipment to embedding e-business in their business strategies.

The M&E industry has not been an early adopter of e-business. Starting from a comparatively low level, however, companies have now begun to develop their own strategies.

An important application area for e-business in the M&E industry is after sales service. Machines are increasingly being sold in combination with services covering implementation, maintenance,etc. These services offer many opportunities for the use of electronic service delivery tools.

e business profile the automotive industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The automotive industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the automotiveindustry

Large enterprises in the automotive industry are advanced users of e-business technologies, mainly for automating B2B processes.

Despite the fact that numerous e-business applications are frequently used in the automotive industry, research by e-Business W@tch confirms that ICT-enabled innovations still remain a source of competitive advantage.

The process of inter-firm integration proceeds rapidly in the automotive industry. Online procurement has become a part of everyday business and belongs to the most frequently adopted e-business applications.

e business profile the aeronautics industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The aeronautics industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the aeronauticsindustry

The aeronautics companies realise ICT as a potential source of competitive advantage and an enabler and driver of innovation.

ICT-enabled process innovations are positively associated with increasing turnover among firms in the industry. Yet innovative firms are not more profitable than other firms, suggesting either that profits triggered by innovations take more time to materialise in this sector than in other sectors.

Electronic procurement is a key application in this industry. Although the high complexity and specialisation of end products in this sector put some restrictions on online trading.

e business profile the construction industry

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The construction industry

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the construction sector

The construction industry has yet to show the same level of productivity improvements as other industries This has also to do with a comparatively slow ICT uptake.

Attitudes towards ICT in the construction industry have traditionally been of a conservative nature. Most companies are more reactive rather than proactive in adopting e-business as a tool to increase competitiveness.

Large enterprises from the industry and new sector entrants have implemented ICT-based production processes, but there is still untapped potential for using ICT to increase productivity, for example with the usage of a Production Planning Systems (PPS).

e business profile the tourism sector

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The tourism sector

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the tourism industry

ICT are an important facilitator of competitive advantage in the tourism industry.

There is enormous customer-driven demand for e-business products and services, and the trend is that demand will continue to rise.The focus is on customer-facing activities, encompassing all areas of marketing and sales.

Online booking and reservation services have become widely accepted among consumers and business travellers. The adoption rate of selling online in tourism is approximately twice as high as on average among the 10 sectors.

Anyway, there remains a lack of applications serving the tourist on-the-spot.

e business profile the it services sector

Sector Profiles

E-business profile: The IT services sector

e-Business dimensions (sub-indices):

A = Basic ICT Infrastructure

B = Internal processes

C = Supply-side e-business activity

D = Electronic marketing and sales

Scale:

Max = maximum e-business intensity in one of the 10 sectors benchmarked

Average = average e-business intensity in the 10 sectors benchmarked

Blue diamond = relative e-business

intensity in the IT services sector

ICT and e-business services are not only the output of the IT services sector. They influence crucially the way in which this output is produced, promoted and provided.

This specific way of using ICT distinguishes IT services from the other industries. As a consequence, adoption and use of nearly all major e-business applications are above the average of the 10 sectors studied.

In particular, the IT services sector sets standards for the use of basic ICT infrastructure and customer-facing e-business applications.

The sector also indicates the potential of e-business for SMEs, which account for about 99% of IT services firms.

adoption of online purchasing activity by sector

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online purchasing activity by sector

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted by employment

(=enterprises compromising …% of

employment in a sector)

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

adoption of online selling activity by sector

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online selling activity by sector

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted by employment

(=enterprises compromising …% of

employment in a sector)

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

adoption of online purchasing activity by firm size

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online purchasing activity by firm size

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted in % of

enterprises from the size-band

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

adoption of online selling activity by firm size

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online selling activity by firm size

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted in % of

enterprises from the size-band

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

adoption of online purchasing activity by country

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online purchasing activity by country

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted in % of

enterprises from the size-band

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

adoption of online selling activity by country

E-Commerce Adoption

Adoption of online selling activity by country

Base: EU-7 (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK),

all enterprises from a sector. N=5218 (total).

Weighting: Data weighted in % of

enterprises from the size-band

Survey question:

Buying online: F1: “Does your company

use the Internet or other computer-

mediated networks to purchase goods or

services online?” F2: “When did your

company purchase goods or services

online for the first time?”

Selling online: G3: “Does your company

sell goods or services online on the

Internet or through other computer-

mediated networks?” G4: “When did your

company offer goods or services online

for the first time?”

Source: e-Business W@tch (Survey 2005)

methodological notes the e business survey 2005 i

Methodological Notes

Methodological notes: the e-Business Survey 2005 (I)

A representative CATI survey

e-Business W@tch collects data on the use of ICT and e-business in European enterprises by means of representative surveys.

The e-Business Survey 2005, which was the third survey after those of 2002 and 2003, had a scope of 5,218 telephone interviews with decision-makers in enterprises from 7 EU countries (CZ, DE, ES, FR, IT, PL, UK) and 10 sectors.

Interviews were carried out in January and February 2005, using computer-aided telephone interview (CATI) technology.

Population and sampling

In contrast to the surveys of 2002 and 2003, the 2005 survey considered only companies that used computers.

The highest level of the population was the set of all computer-using enterprises which were active within the national territory of one of the 7 countries covered, and which had their primary business activity in one of the 10 sectors specified on the basis of NACE Rev. 1.1 categories.

No cut-off was made in terms of minimum size of firms. The sample drawn was a random sample of companies from the respective sector population in each of the 7 countries, with the objective of fulfilling minimum strata with respect to company size band (micro, small, medium, large) per country-sector cell.

Weighting

For data presentation, two weighting schemes have been applied: weighting by employment and weighting by the number of enterprises.

methodological notes the e business survey 2005 ii

Methodological Notes

Methodological notes: the e-Business Survey 2005 (II)

Statistical accuracy – confidence intervals

For totals of all 10 sectors covered, an accuracy of +/- 2 percentage points can be expected for most values that are expressed as "% of firms", and of +/- 3 percentage points for values that are weighted by employment.

The confidence interval for sector totals (EU-7) is about +/ -5 percentage points (in both weighting schemes).

Employment-weighted results for the pharmaceutical, the automotive and the aeronautics industry have higher confidence intervals, because these sectors are more sensitive to weights due to their structure (i.e. the dominance of large firms in a comparatively small population). In the aeronautics industry, employment-weighted figures are only indicative.

More information

More detailed information about the e-Business Survey 2005 is available at the e-Business W@tch website (www.ebusiness-watch.org) in the 'about' section (see: 'methodology').

acknowledgements

Methodological Notes

Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

This Chart Report has been prepared on behalf of the European Commission, Enterprise and Industry Directorate General, by empirica Gesellschaft für Kommunikations- und Technologieforschung mbH.

It is a publication in the context of "e-Business W@tch", which is implemented by empirica GmbH in co-operation with Berlecon Research, DIW Berlin, Databank Consulting, Lios Geal Consultants, RAMBØLL Management and Salzburg Research GmbH.

Editors: Hannes Selhofer, Alexander Schaer (empirica GmbH)

Disclaimer

Neither the European Commission nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission is responsible for the use which might be made of the following information. Nothing in this report implies or expresses a warranty of any kind. Results from this report should only be used as guidelines as part of an overall strategy.

Copy-right notice

Material from this Chart-Report can be freely used but not commercially resold and, if used or quoted, the source must be clearly acknowledged.

© European Commission / e-Business W@tch (September 2005)