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Language Services: The Why and the How April 2013. Objectives. Recognize the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services Explain the role of the patient and companion in determining what services are required for effective communication

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objectives
Objectives

Recognize the importance of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services

Explain the role of the patient and companion in determining what services are required for effective communication

Identify the laws governing language services

  • Identify four ways to access spoken language interpreter services at Inova
  • Describe the five steps to follow in providing services to the Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  • Explain how to arrange for sign language interpreters and/or auxiliary aids at Inova
attention
ATTENTION!

PLEASE NOTE: This module details the

processes required in using the paper forms. Use of the related Epic flows will be taught separately at each OU or other entity and to the appropriate staff as Epic rolls out across the System.

northern virginia an international community
Northern Virginia: An International Community
  • Highly diverse community of approximately 2,623,079 people
  • 45% of the people identify with a minority group
  • Approximately 24% are foreign born
  • Over 33% speak a language other than English at home; 12% speak English “less than very well”
  • Among the most common foreign languages spoken at home in Northern Virginia are:
  • Vietnamese
  • Arabic
  • Farsi
  • Urdu
  • Spanish
  • Amharic
  • Chinese
  • Korean

The region we serve

* Census 2010 and ACS 2011, 5-year estimate

office of health equity ohe
Office of Health Equity (OHE)

Vision:

  • A community where all residents have access to resources that promote and sustain health and well being.

Mission:

  • To create a community where
  • systemic and avoidable health disparities are steadily reduced, so that the gap between the best and worst off is narrowed;
  • all residents have equitable access to a full range of high-quality healthcare and support;
  • all have equal opportunities for optimal health and well being
office of health equity
Office of Health Equity

Selected Office of Health Equity Programs and Services

Language Services

Spoken language interpretation

Sign Language interpretation and the provision of other services for the deaf or hard of hearing

Translation of vital documents

Training and Education

Diversity, Cultural Competence and Health Equity Education

21st Century Leadership Development

Now We’re Talking! Bi-lingual staff interpreter training

patient centered care and cultural competence
Patient-Centered Care and Cultural Competence
  • Patient-Centered Care
  • Is by definition culturally and linguistically appropriate
  • Ensures that patients, companions and providers partner in care and explore all health options
  • Is delivered in a manner that meets patient preferences
  • Is deeply respectful of patient and family values, beliefs and traditions

you

you

Experiences

Perceived Reality

The “truth”

The “truth”

  • 7
patient centered care effective communication
Patient-Centered Care & Effective Communication
  • Patient centered care requires effective communication
  • Effective communication requires that information is understood by all parties involved in care

AND

  • Understood thoroughly enough that the parties can use or act upon information exchanged

This is true for all patients regardless of race, ethnicity, age, gender, education, religion, socio-economic status, language spoken, etc.

slide10
Laws Governing

Language Services

spoken language
Spoken Language

No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

  • Language is considered a proxy for national origin. (precedent, beginning 1926)
  • We must provide the same quality care regardless of and language spoken
  • Enforced by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
  • 10
spoken language highlights of title vi
Spoken Language: Highlights of Title VI
  • Trained medical interpreters must be provided to our Limited English proficient patients at no cost to the patient
    • A person who is limited English proficient either does not speak English or speaks English “less than very well.”
    • Vital documents must be translated and communicated in patient’s language, including:
    • application and enrollment forms
    • letters or notices regarding eligibility or changes in benefits
    • anything requiring a response
    • patient consent forms
    • documents of a legal or financial nature
  • 11
slide13

Sign Language/Services for Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

No individual may be discriminated against in the full and equal enjoyment of goods, services, facilities, privileges and accommodations in privately operated commercial facilities that are open to the public.

  • ADA ensures equal access to goods and services for persons who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • ADA requires effective communication, and the provision of appropriate auxiliary aids and services (including qualified interpreters) when necessary to ensure effective communication for patients with disabilities
  • Enforced by the Department of Justice (DoJ)
what is a companion under the law
What is a Companion under the law?

Companions must be offered language assistance

The term “Companion” means: a person who is limited English proficient or deaf or hard of hearing and needs to communicate with the staff about the patient’s care

Includes but is not limited to:

Someone who assists in providing care or comfort

Someone who assists in decision-making

Legal guardian

Power of Attorney

Disclosure of information to the Companion is governed by HIPAA

If there is a question as to whether the individual meets the definition above, consider the individual a companion

interpreter policy summary
Interpreter Policy Summary
  • Any patient and/or companion who is limited English proficient or deaf or hard of hearing must be offered interpreter services or auxiliary aids free of charge
  • Interpreter services must be provided by trained interpreters
  • Friends and family may not be used as interpreters unless specifically requested by the patient and charted accordingly
  • Minor children should never be used as interpreters
  • In an extreme emergency, render any necessary and appropriate medical treatment and use your best efforts to provide the most effective communication possible until the interpreter arrives
  • 14
spoken language your responsibilities
Spoken Language: Your Responsibilities
  • Complete a communication assessment
  • Secure needed interpreters
  • Complete the necessary documentation
step 1 spoken language assessment
Step 1: Spoken Language Assessment
  • All Patients must be asked their language preference
  • The question to ask is: “In what language do you prefer to talk with your doctors or nurses?”
  • Rely on the patient’s or companion’s own assessment of his/her English proficiency in determining the need for an interpreter.
  • Document the patient’s preference in the patient’s record.
step 2 secure interpreter services
Step 2: Secure Interpreter Services
  • If a patient or companion indicates a language preference other than English
  • Staff Interpreters (Spanish)
    • Inova staff interpreters in Spanish are available on all Inova hospital campuses
    • A complete list with hours of coverage and phone numbers can be found on InovaNet: http://inovanet.net.inova.org/?id=1615&sid=1
    • Call the appropriate extension to obtain a staff interpreter at your location
slide20

Step 2: Secure Interpreter Services

  • If patient or companion prefers a language other than English
  • Services available at ALL Inova facilities in multiple languages:
    • Contracted, On-Site Interpreters
        • To pre-schedule an interpreter, access the “Inova Interpreter Request” on InovaNet
        • If the request requires an immediate response, use the Language Bank, the interpreter phones or call the Scheduler at 703-776-7641 (Option 2)

Inova Interpreter Request

https://wlcapps.net.inova.org/langreq/LangRequest/LangRequest.html

slide21

Step 2: Secure Interpreter Services

  • If patient or companion prefers a language other than English
  • Services available at ALL Inova facilities in multiple languages:
    • Volunteer Interpreters who have completed 40-hour medical interpreter training.
      • Search “Language Bank” on InovaNet
      • Over 600 volunteer interpreters in 45 languages
    • Telephonic Interpretation (Interpreter phones)
        • Available 24/7 in 170 languages
step 3 documentation
Step 3: Documentation
  • In the patient record, document:
    • Language preference/ requests for service
      • Note name or identifying number of interpreter used
    • Refusals of service and how you respond
      • Note name of individual chosen to interpret by patient and relationship to patient
    • Emergency situation necessitate the start of care before a trained interpreter arrives.
    • Any unusual circumstances

If it isn’t documented, it didn’t happen.

slide23
Services for

Deaf

or Hard of Hearing:

Your Responsibilities

slide24

Services for the Deaf/HoH: Your Responsibilities

Understanding the patient’s perspective will help you understand the need to rely on the patient to tell us what services or aids are needed for effective communication.

We must identify and assist 100% of our patients and companions who are deaf or hard of hearing.

There is a 0 tolerance policy

deaf hoh your responsibilities
Deaf/HoH: Your Responsibilities
  • Complete the necessary communication assessment
  • Secure needed resources
  • Undertake steps until an interpreter arrives
  • Adhere to necessary steps when an interpreter arrives
  • Complete all required documentation
slide26
Purpose: Allows patients and companions to identify as deaf or hard of hearing and request or decline specific services

Must be completed by ALL patients

At the first opportunity to assess:

Provide the CRF to ALL patients

ALL patients must answer two questions:

Are you or any of your companions deaf?

Are you or any of your companions hard of hearing?

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form (CRF)

slide27
Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form

Patient may indicate that the form stands for the current course of treatment

This refers to certain hospital-based series accounts

These accounts reset at the first of each month.

If a patient is readmitted after the account resets, he or she will be required to complete a new CRF

Step 1: Communication Assessment

slide28
Only the top section of the CRF needs to be completed.

The patient must sign and date the form and note the time.

Hospital personnel must also sign and date the form and indicate contact information.

The process is complete.

Maintain the completed form in the patient record (fax to Medical Records)

Step 1: Communication Assessment

If neither patient nor companion(s) is deaf or hard of hearing:

slide29

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form:

When a Patient or Companion is Deaf or Hard of Hearing

  • Any patient or companion who is deaf or hard of hearing must complete the middle section of the CRF.
  • Purpose: This allows the individual who is deaf or hard of hearing to:
    • Request specific services and/or auxiliary aids
    • Decline services
slide30

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form

  • The request MUST be based on the patient or companion preferences
  • Never try to dissuade a patient or companion from requesting a specific service or aid
  • If circumstances do not allow for the form to be completed by the patient or companion, you may assist in completing the form
  • The patient or companion must sign and date the form and indicate the time of completion
  • Hospital personnel must also sign and date the form and include contact information
  • Maintain the completed form in the patient record (fax to Medical Records)
slide31

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form

  • The CRF has a second page, the FAQ’s/Complaint Resolution Process
  • Detach page 2 and provide this to the patient or companion
  • For any paper chart, you must also complete and affix to the chart the Deaf/HOH Chart Flag (yellow 8 ½ x 14” form)
slide32

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf/HoH Patient and/or Companion Identifier

  • Any patient or companion who is deaf or hard of hearing must be offered a visual identifier.
  • Use orange wrist bands for this purpose.
    • Patient or companion is deaf: Use the band with the symbol indicating deafness.
    • Patient or companion is hard of hearing: Use the band that has “HOH.”
slide33

Step 1: Communication Assessment

Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form

  • If a patient identifies a deaf or hard of hearing companion who is not at the hospital, but will require service upon arrival, staff must:
    • Provide the patient with the contact information for anyone on the unit who can assist the companion in completing the Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form (CRF) and/or
    • Provide the CRF to the companion when he/she identifies him/herself
slide34

Step 1: Communication Assessment

In a public area:

  • If you are approached by an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing in a public area of the hospital, help the person locate appropriate staff to assist in completing forms and getting services.
  • Examples of how you may help include:
    • Accompany the patient/companion to an appropriate unit in the hospital (for example, assigned unit, registration, information, etc.)
    • Locate clinical or registration staff or unit secretaries, etc., who may be able to assist
    • Locate a NexTalk unit that may help to facilitate discussion
    • Exchange written notes , if appropriate, to answer immediate questions (for example, to provide directions)

Rely on one another!

step 2 secure the needed resources
Step 2: Secure the Needed Resources

Within 15 minutesfrom the time the completed Deaf or Hard of Hearing Communication Request Form is signed, staff must:

  • Call 703-776-7641 to obtain a Sign Language Interpreter
    • System-wide phone number
    • Answered 24/7/365
    • Use for scheduled and emergent needs
    • Time frame to have a Sign Language interpreter on site for emergent needs: within 2 hours signing of the Communication Request Form

Within 30 minutes from the time the completed CRF is signed, staff must:

  • Secure NexTalk video remote interpreter when requested (where available), and/or
  • Secure the appropriate auxiliary aids/services
slide36

Step 2: Secure the Needed Resources

These devices and services are available free ofcharge to patients or companions:

  • Sign Language and Oral Interpreters
  • Video Remote Interpreters (NexTalk)
  • TTY’s
  • Pocketalkers (assistive amplification devices

best used for moderately hearing impaired people)

  • Written materials
  • Telephone handset amplifiers
  • Telephones compatible with hearing aids
  • Closed captioning of hospital programs
  • Virginia Relay Service -711

NexTalk

TTY

Pocketalker

step 3 until the interpreter arrives
Step 3: Until the Interpreter Arrives
  • Communicate by writing notes
    • Use multiple means of communicating
    • Chart all notes exchanged
  • Use NexTalk (Video Remote Interpreting) where available
    • In EDs, L&Ds and for check-out from Administrative Director
  • Do not rely on lip reading
        • Unless the patient insists it is his/her preferred method of communication
  • Document what you do!
step 4 when the interpreter arrives
Step 4: When the Interpreter Arrives

Sign Language Interpreter Schedule

Within 90 minutesafter the interpreter has been provided AND when a patient is expected to remain in the hospital 12 or more hours:

  • Patient and/or companion must determine the Sign Language Interpreter Schedule for the expected duration of stay
  • Base the Schedule exclusively on the -patient’s and/or companion’s wishes
  • Staff must provide information to assist
step 4 when the interpreter arrives1
Step 4: When the interpreter arrives

Sign Language Interpreter Schedule

  • The patient or companion and hospital personnel must sign and date the Interpreter Schedule
  • Call 703-776-7641 to activate the completed schedule, AND
  • Maintain the completed schedule in the patient’s medical record
  • Provide a hard copy to the patient/companion
  • Patients and/or companions have the right to request a change to their schedule at any time
  • As conditions change, staff should periodically consult the patient and/or companion to assess the Interpreter Schedule and modify, if necessary.
  • Revised schedule(s) must be called in to 703-776-7641and maintained in the patient record (fax to Medical Records)
step 4 when the interpreter arrives2
Step 4: When the interpreter arrives

Sign Language Interpreter Schedule

  • Staff must assist the patient and/or companion in completing the schedule by providing the following information (to the extent that it is both reasonably ascertainable and allowed under HIPAA):
    • the anticipated period of time that the patient will be in the Hospital;
    • the nature of the patient’s condition, including its seriousness and stability;
    • the likelihood of needing to communicate with the patient or companion at unexpected or unforeseen times;
    • the most common hours that hospital personnel will need to communicate with the patient or companion
    • the availability of 24-hour interpreter services and auxiliary aids free of charge
step 5 documentation requirements
Step 5: Documentation Requirements
  • In the patient chart document:
    • All requests for or refusals of service (documented on the CRF)
    • Your response to the such requests for or refusals of service
    • Any notes exchanged
    • Types of services or auxiliary aids used
    • Any unusual circumstances

If it isn’t documented, it didn’t happen.

slide42

Monitoring and Compliance

  • Compliance with policies and procedures for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is monitored by Inova’s ADA Compliance Officer
  • Results of random chart audits are shared with departmental leaders for continuous ongoing quality improvement
  • If you become aware of an instance where patients or companions did not receive their requested deaf or hard of hearing services within the required timeframes, please report this to the ADA Compliance Officer
  • Please note: Contact information for Office of Health Equity Staff and the ADA Compliance Officer can be on InovaNet: http://inovanet.net.inova.org/?id=1861&sid=1
additional information
Additional Information

INTERPRETER SERVICES