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TBR Remediation Efforts. PART ONE. Guide for Public Universities and Colleges for spending grants and funding allocated for Compliance with Title l, II and III 2010 Standard (ADA ABA). HISTORY.

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slide2

Guide for Public Universities and Collegesfor spending grants and funding allocated for Compliance with Title l, II and III 2010 Standard (ADA ABA)

history
HISTORY

GRANTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN TO THE STATES OVER THE YEARS SPECIFICALLY ALLOCATED FOR BRINGING SCHOOLS INTO COMPLIANCE WITH THE FEDERAL ADAAG

slide4

TENNESSEE BOARD OF REGENTS HAVE DIVIDED THESE FUNDS UP AMONG THE COLLEGES IN THE TBR SYSTEM FOR THE PURPOSE OF

CORRECTING COMPLIANCE ISSUES

ON THE TBR SYSTEM CAMPUSES

slide5

TO HELP GIVE DIRECTION TO THE FACILITIES COORDINATORS IN ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION PLAN THAT GETS THE MOST DONE FOR GRANT DOLLAR

TBR HAS PDS AMERICA PERFORMING ACCESSIBILITY AUDITS AT ALL COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN THE TBR SYSTEM

slide6

FOCUS

WILL BE ON MAIN CAMPUSES

grants
Grants
  • Provided yearly if available (federal or state)
  • Correct problems in order of PRIORITY – TIMELINE
  • Keep working the recommended GAME PLAN until all work is done
  • May take 10 years
no funds no remediation
NO FUNDS?No remediation!
  • Rely on existing reasonable accommodation policies until funds are available again.
slide10

QUESTIONS

??????

slide11

Current Section of ADAAG

that govern

State Universities

and Colleges

code note
CODE NOTE

REMEDIATION AUDITS WILL USE LANGUAGE IN 2010 STANDARD SPECIFICALLY FOR REMEDIATION PROJECTS BECAUSE THE NEW LAW SPELLS OUT SPECIFIC BREAKS AND SAFE HARBOR REQUIREMENTS FOR TITLE ll FACILITIES

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Title I

    • Employees & Staff
  • Title II
    • Program Accessibility
  • Title III
    • Public Accomodations
title i employees staff
Title IEmployees & Staff
  • Staff offices
  • Staff work areas
  • Staff lounges
  • Staff area toilets
  • Coaches locker rooms
title ii program accessibility
Title IIProgram Accessibility
  • Primary Function
    • Classrooms
    • Labs
    • Art Rooms
    • Music Rooms
    • Locker Rooms
  • Support
    • Registration office
    • Student Center
    • Computer Labs
title iii public accommodation
Title IIIPublic Accommodation
  • Campus Theatres
  • Sports Facilities
  • Libraries
    • (when open to public)
  • Planetarium
  • Walking Trails
existing facilities
Existing Facilities
  • 2010 Standards passed July 23,2010:  The ADA and ABA guidelines cover new construction and planned alterations and generally do not apply to existing facilities, except where altered With respect to ABA facilities, the Board has clarified in the guidelines that facilities built to earlier ABA standards are subject to the new requirements only in relation to planned alterations.
slide19

Title II requires programs, services or activities to be readily accessible when viewed in their entirety; it also allows publicly owned colleges and universities to make programs and activities available to HC students without extensive retrofitting of their existing buildings by offering programs through alternative methods.

  • This practice is commonly referred to as “reasonable accommodation”.
slide20

FACTOID:

SCHOOLS DON’T HAVE TO BRING THEIR BUILDINGS INTO ADA COMPLIANCE,

THEY JUST CAN’T OFFER PROGRAMS THAT ENROLL HC STUDENTS THERE.

reasonable accomodation
Reasonable Accomodation

Alternative Method Option ADAAG gives to colleges and universities under

Title II.

examples of reasonable accommodation
Examples of Reasonable Accommodation
  • Move classroom to accessible building
  • Move class to main campus
  • Pay for transportation to another school
  • Provide special equipment
  • Move award program to gym floor when HC stage not available.
  • Provide shuttle from HC parking
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PREVIOUS REMEDIATION EFFORTS WERE DONE UNDER SCOPING FOR 28 CFR PART 36 AND NOT TITLE ll

WHICH USES 28 CFR 35

28 cfr 36
28 CFR 36
  • Sec.36.304 Removal of barriers.
  • (a) General. A public accommodation shall remove architectural barriers in existing facilities, including communication barriers that are structural in nature, where such removal is readily achievable, i.e., easily accomplishable and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense.
28 cfr part 35
28 CFR PART 35
  • Consistent with section 204(b) of the Act, this regulation adopts the program accessibility concept found in the section 504 regulations for federally conducted programs or activities (e.g., 28 CFR Part 39).
slide29

The concept of "program accessibility" was first used in the section 504 regulation adopted by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare for its federally assisted programs and activities in 1977. It allowed recipients to make their federally assisted programs and activities available to individuals with disabilities without extensive retrofitting of their existing buildings and facilities, by offering those programs through alternative methods.

slide30

Program accessibility has proven to be a useful approach and was adopted in the regulations issued for programs and activities conducted by Federal Executive agencies. The Act provides that the concept of program access will continue to apply with respect to facilities now in existence, because the cost of retrofitting existing facilities is often prohibitive.

slide31

Section 35.150 requires that each service, program, or activity conducted by a public entity, when viewed in its entirety, be readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

summary section one
Summary Section One
  • Most State Colleges receive Federal Dollars
  • Colleges Primarily Under Program Accessibility Rules of Title ll
  • Most colleges have buildings that existed prior to 1991 (First ADAAG passed)
  • Minimum requirements for program accessibility provided per Title ll
  • Many campuses and buildings do not meet minimum standards for Title ll
slide33

QUESTIONS

??????

part two
PART TWO

Campus Accessibility Guide

campus ada audits
Campus ADA Audits
  • Provided by TBR
  • Provides system wide remediation strategy related to existing conditions at each facility.
  • Provides priority time line for spending grant funds
campus accessibility guide
Campus Accessibility Guide

PURPOSE

Helps ADA committees and facilities personnel understand requirements of Title I, II, & III as they are related to their campus and also better understand the remediation steps and recommendations provided in Campus Audit Reports

steps toward a smart remediation plan
Steps Toward a Smart Remediation Plan
  • Physical Site – Audit
  • Buildings built before 1991
  • Buildings built 1991 to 2009
first priority to make campus program accessible
First priority, to make campusProgram Accessible

Physical Site

  • Arrival Points
  • Bus Stops
  • HC Parking
  • Passenger Loading Zone
  • Accessible paths from arrival points to HC building entrances.
  • Connector paths between buildings
accessible path components
Accessible Path Components
  • HC Parking – slopes & signage
  • Accesible path – run slope & cross slope, plus surface
  • Ramps & curb ramps in path
  • Protruding objects
  • Compliant signage
  • Maintenance issues
second priority buildings built before 1991
Second Priority,Buildings built before 1991.

Basic Program Accessibility Components

  • Accessible Entrance
  • Accessible Path in building
  • Compliant Drinking Fountains
  • Compliant toilets, each sex or one HC unisex toilet
  • One accessible classroom or lab of each type
  • Accessible staff offices or accessible meeting room
types of classrooms
Types of Classrooms
  • General
  • Lecture Halls
  • Music Rooms
  • Art rooms (one of each type)
  • Labs (one of each type)
  • Computer Labs (where computer classes taught)
  • Specialty Rooms
    • Dressing rooms
    • Make up rooms
    • Lab prep rooms
alterations additions
Alterations/Additions
  • Not required under ADAAG on existing buildings, but when done – must meet requirements for new construction in CURRENT STANDARD
example
Example
  • Lab Renovation
    • Law says renovation must be on accessible path and toilet rooms and drinking fountains serving remodeled or new space must be accessible.
slide47

QUESTIONS

??????

part three
PART THREE

Current LAW

And

2010 Standard

slide52

The 2010 Standard mirrors the ANSI text, details and numbering system. Much of the new requirements in the 2010 Standard were already required in ANSI 2003. There are still slight differences in many sections so careful sections and highlighting of differences is recommended.

guidelines background
GUIDELINES BACKGROUND
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990
  • The Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) 1968
slide55

Architectural

Barriers Act

1968

2010 standard1
2010 Standard

Combines both ADA and ABA scoping into one code book with a technical requirements section referenced by both.

slide57
Under newly updated law the old ADAAG will be referred to as 1991 Standard
  • The new combined ADA ABA will be known as 2010 Standard
u s access board
U.S. ACCESS BOARD

An independent Federal Agency

Developed and Updated the new 2010 Standard

under 2010 standards
Under 2010 Standards:
  • Private Entities
    • Use ADA Scoping
  • Federal Entities
    • Use ABA Scoping
  • State & Local Entities
    • May use ADA OR ABA Scoping
  • All Jurisdictions
    • Use Chapters 3-10 for Technical Requirements
2010 standard effective dates doj
2010 STANDARD EFFECTIVE DATES - DOJ
  • These final rules will take effect March 15, 2011. Compliance with the 2010 Standards for Accessible Design is permitted as of September 15, 2010, but not required until March 15, 2012. The Department has prepared fact sheets identifying the major changes in the rules.
slide61

This means TBR designers may begin using the 2010 standards March 15, 2011 but are required to on all projects pulling permits after March 15, 2012.

for accessibility requirements
For Accessibility Requirements

From now until March 15 , 2011 use the current TBR code - IBC Chapter 11 with ANSI 2003.

After March 15, 2011 use the 2010 Standard for projects designed for TBR

slide63

TBR WILL BE PROVIDING MORE INFO ON CODE CHANGES AND EFFECTIVE DATES BOTH ON ITS WEB SITE AND AT THE 2011 FACILITIES COORDINATOR MEETING

slide64

QUESTIONS

??????

u s access board1
U.S. ACCESS BOARD

An independent Federal Agency

  • Develops
  • Updates

accessibility guidelines for new or altered facilities covered by ADA, ABA, in both public and private sectors.

guidelines background1
GUIDELINES BACKGROUND
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990
  • The Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) 1968
goals of this update
GOALS OF THIS UPDATE
  • Update specifications to continue to meet the needs of persons with disabilities.
  • Improving the format and usability of the guidelines to facilitate compliance.
  • Harmonizing the guidelines with model building codes and industry standards.
  • Making the requirements for ADA and ABA facilities consistent.
when will the new guidelines take effect
When will the new guidelines take effect?
  • The Board’s guidelines are not mandatory on the public, but instead serve as the baseline for enforceable standards (which are) maintained by other Federal agencies.  In this respect, they are similar to a model building code in that they are not required to be followed except as adopted by an enforcing authority.  Under the ADA, the Department of Justice (and in the case of transit facilities, the Department of Transportation) are responsible for enforceable standards based on the Board’s guidelines.  These agencies will update their ADA standards based on the new guidelines.  In doing so, they will indicate when the new standards are to be followed.  Several other agencies (the General Services Administration, Department of Defense, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the U.S. Postal Service) hold a similar responsibility for standards used to enforce the ABA.
organization and format
Organization and Format

The updated guidelines feature:

  • a new numbering system consistent with model codes
  • a more streamlined structure and organization of chapters
  • updated scoping and technical provisions, with a greater structural delineation between them
  • new figures and commentary (advisory information)
  • provision of all figure-based information in written text
supplements to adaag
Supplements to ADAAG
  • The Board previously developed supplements to the original ADA guidelines that are specific to different types of facilities and elements:
  • state and local government facilities, including courthouses and prisons (1998)
  • building elements designed for children’s use (1998)
  • play areas (2000)
  • recreation facilities (2002)
  • These supplements are included in the new guidelines.  They have been revised for consistency with the format and approach of the new document, but their substance remains unchanged.
layout of document
Layout of Document

CONTENTS

PART I: ADA APPLICATION AND SCOPING

ADA CHAPTER 1: APPLICATION AND ADMINISTRATION

ADA CHAPTER 2: SCOPING REQUIREMENTS

PART II: ABA APPLICATION AND SCOPING

ABA CHAPTER 1: APPLICATION AND ADMINISTRATION

ABA CHAPTER 2: SCOPING REQUIREMENTS

PART III: TECHNICAL CHAPTERS

CHAPTER 3: BUILDING BLOCKS

CHAPTER 4: ACCESSIBLE ROUTES

CHAPTER 5: GENERAL SITE AND BUILDING ELEMENTS

CHAPTER 6: PLUMBING ELEMENTS AND FACILITIES

CHAPTER 7: COMMUNICATION ELEMENTS AND FEATURES

CHAPTER 8: SPECIAL ROOMS, SPACES AND ELEMENTS

CHAPTER 9: BUILT-IN ELEMENTS

CHAPTER 10: RECREATION FACILITIES

slide77

CHAPTER 3: BUILDING BLOCKS

301 General

302 Floor or Ground Surfaces

303 Changes in Level

304 Turning Space

305 Clear Floor or Ground Space

306 Knee and Toe Clearance

307 Protruding Objects

308 Reach Ranges

309 Operable Parts

slide81
CHAPTER 4: ACCESSIBLE ROUTES

401 General

402 Accessible Routes

403 Walking Surfaces

404 Doors, Doorways, and Gates

405 Ramps

406 Curb Ramps

407 Elevators

408 Limited Use/ Limited Application Elevators

409 Private Residence Elevators

410 Platform Lifts

slide86
Advisory 405.7 Landings. Ramps that do not have level landings at changes in direction can create a compound slope that will not meet the requirements of this document. Circular or curved ramps continually change direction. Curvilinear ramps with small radii also can create compound cross slopes and cannot, by their nature, meet the requirements for accessible routes. A level landing is needed at the accessible door to permit maneuvering and simultaneously door operation.
slide88

410.6 Doors and Gates. Platform lifts shall have low-energy power-operated doors or gates complying with 404.3. Doors shall remain open for 20 seconds minimum. End doors and gates shall provide a clear width 32 inches (815 mm) minimum. Side doors and gates shall provide a clear width 42 inches (1065 mm) minimum.

  • EXCEPTION: Platform lifts serving two landings maximum and having doors or gates on opposite sides shall be permitted to have self-closing manual doors or gates.
slide89
CHAPTER 5: GENERAL SITE AND BUILDING ELEMENTS

501 General

502 Parking Spaces

503 Passenger Loading Zones

504 Stairways

505 Handrails

slide93

Advisory 505.4 Height. The requirements for stair and ramp handrails in this document are for adults. When children are the principle users in a building or facility (e.g., elementary schools), a second set of handrails at an appropriate height can assist them and aid in preventing accidents. A maximum height of 28 inches (710 mm) measured to the top of the gripping surface from the ramp surface or stair nosing is recommended for handrails designed for children. Sufficient vertical clearance between upper and lower handrails, 9 inches (230 mm) minimum, should be provided to help prevent entrapment.

slide94
CHAPTER 6: PLUMBING ELEMENTS AND FACILITIES

601 General

602 Drinking Fountains

603 Toilet and Bathing Rooms

604 Water Closets and Toilet Compartments

605 Urinals

606 Lavatories and Sinks

607 Bathtubs

608 Shower Compartments

609 Grab Bars

610 Seats

611 Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers

612 Saunas and Steam Rooms

hand held shower heads
Hand Held Shower Heads

607.6 Shower Spray Unit and Water.

A shower spray unit with a hose 59 inches (1500 mm) long minimum that can be used both as a fixed-position shower head and as a hand-held shower shall be provided. The shower spray unit shall have an on/off control with a non-positive shut-off. If an adjustable-height shower head on a vertical bar is used, the bar shall be installed so as not to obstruct the use of grab bars. Bathtub shower spray units shall deliver water that is 120°F (49°C) maximum.

slide101
CHAPTER 7: COMMUNICATION ELEMENTS AND FEATURES

701 General

702 Fire Alarm Systems

703 Signs

704 Telephones

705 Detectable Warnings

706 Assistive Listening Systems

707 Automatic Teller Machines and Fare Machines

708 Two-Way Communication Systems

slide102
CHAPTER 8: SPECIAL ROOMS, SPACES, AND ELEMENTS

801 General

802 Wheelchair Spaces, Companion Seats, and Designated Aisle Seats

803 Dressing, Fitting, and Locker Rooms

804 Kitchens and Kitchenettes

805 Medical Care and Long-Term Care Facilities

806 Transient Lodging Guest Rooms

807 Holding Cells and Housing Cells

808 Courtrooms

809 Residential Dwelling Units

810 Transportation Facilities

811 Storage

slide105

CHAPTER 9: BUILT-IN ELEMENTS

901 General

902 Dining Surfaces and Work Surfaces

903 Benches

904 Check-Out Aisles and Sales and Service Counters

slide106

CHAPTER 10: RECREATION FACILITIES

1001 General

1002 Amusement Rides

1003 Recreational Boating Facilities

1004 Exercise Machines and Equipment

1005 Fishing Piers and Platforms

1006 Golf Facilities

1007 Miniature Golf Facilities

1008 Play Areas

1009 Swimming Pools, Wading Pools, and Spas

1010 Shooting Facilities with Firing Positions