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HRSD Supervisory Success Training. Beyond Worksite Wellness: Health and Productivity as a Key Management Tool. Agenda. Presentation of the Following Topic Areas: Module 1: Building the Business Case Module 2: Role of Leadership

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hrsd supervisory success training

HRSDSupervisory Success Training

Beyond Worksite Wellness:

Health and Productivity as a

Key Management Tool

agenda
Agenda

Presentation of the Following Topic Areas:

  • Module 1: Building the Business Case
  • Module 2: Role of Leadership
  • Module 3: Health and Productivity for Performance Management
learning objectives
Learning Objectives:
  • Understand the business case for contemporary worksite wellness programs.
  • Comprehend the critical role of agency leadership in successful implementation of health and wellness programs.
  • Be conversant in connecting health and wellness with core business needs, most notably performance management.
module 1 building the business case
Module 1: Building the Business Case

Objective: Understand the business case for contemporary worksite wellness programs.

  • Our Overall Population: A Crisis in Wellness
  • Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite? 
  • Defining Workforce Wellness
  • Defining Worksite Wellness Programs
our overall population a crisis in wellness
Our Overall Population: A Crisis in Wellness

Factors That Influence Health

Our society faces an epidemic in chronic disease that is caused largely by unhealthy lifestyle practices.

Unhealthy lifestyles are factors in the six leading causes of death – heart disease, cancer, stroke, respiratory diseases, accidents and diabetes. Together they account for 70 % of all deaths in the US.

Source: Recruitment & Retention References: Foreman Facts, from the Labor Relations Institute of NY

why does health and wellness belong at the worksite
Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite?
  • Economic Costs – Health care costs are a tremendous burden to employers and government employees represent the largest workforce in Washington State.
  • Captive Audience - Most employees spend more than half their waking hours at work. “Make the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice”where you spend the majority of your day.
  • Opportunity to Influence- Worksites offer the opportunity to deliver repeated, consistent communications through multiple channels.
    • A worksite’s physical, social and cultural environments can also be modified as a way to influence employee lifestyle and behavior change.
    • Supervisors, managers and peers can serve as either influential facilitators or as barriers.
why does health and wellness belong at the worksite1
Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite?
  • Direct Costs - Health insurance costs directly impact the employee and the organization's bottom line. Research has also shown that employee health and wellness has a direct impact on:
    • worker's compensation claims
    • annual leave, including sick time
    • grievances
  • Indirect Costs - Research has shown that both absenteeism and presenteeism are significant cost factors for an employer and both can be reduced by the implementation of a comprehensive worksite wellness program.

Source: (Archives of Internal Medicine, April 23, 2007), as well as the frequency of disability claims (Employee Benefit News, July 2007). Institute for Health and Productivity Management at http://www.ihpm.org

why does health and wellness belong at the worksite2
Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite?
  • 2004 study estimated the cost of presenteeism on businesses at an average of $255 per employee per year.*
  • On-the-job productivity losses from presenteeism were as high as 60% of the total cost of worker illness, exceeding the costs of absenteeism, medical, and disability benefits.

Time-Away-from-Work**

Medical & Pharmacy

Worker’sCompensation

Presenteeism

Absenteeism

Long-term Disability

Short-term Disability

Sources:

: *Medstat and the Cornell University Institute for Health and Productivity Studies

** Edington, Burton. A Practical Approach to Occupational and Environmental Medicine (McCunney). 140-152. 2003

why does health and wellness belong at the worksite3
Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite?

For chronic conditions like allergies and headaches, on-the-job productivity losses accounted for more than 80% of employers' total illness costs. Did you know that out of every 100 employees:

  • 60 are sedentary
  • 25 smoke
  • 64 are overweight or obese
  • 27 have active cardiovascular disease
  • 10 have diabetes
  • 50 have high cholesterol
  • 24 have high blood pressure
  • 50 are distressed or depressed

Source: Medstat and the Cornell University Institute for Health and Productivity Studies

slide10

Health Risks and Behaviors: Hours Lost – A Breakdown

Burton, Conti, Chen, Schultz, Edington. JOEM.41,863-877, 1999.

why does health and wellness belong at the worksite4
Why Does Health and Wellness Belong at the Worksite?

Triple Threat: Improves Employee Health, Reduces Costs & Improves Productivity

  • 44% of companies offering health promotion activities report a reduction in healthcare costs
  • 50% realize a decline in absenteeism
  • 56% see an increase in productivity

Source: Medstat and the Cornell University Institute for Health and Productivity Studies

defining workforce wellness
Defining Workforce Wellness
  • Having a healthy and high-performing workforce especially in times of economic hardships and increased workload is crucial in order to keep your organization competitive and accountable.
  • Wellness means more than just the absence of disease.
  • Wellness is about consciously choosing to live life in a way that brings about optimal health and life satisfaction.
defining workforce wellness1
Defining Workforce Wellness

A healthy workforce has the following attributes for optimal performance. Both individuals and organizations must be:

Healthy

Demonstrating optimal health status as defined by positive health behaviors, minimal modifiable risk factors, and minimal illnesses, diseases, and injuries such as;

  • eating well (nutrition),
  • exercising (physical activity),
  • resting and relaxing (stress reduction),
  • healthy relationships,
  • being careful about sickness,
  • reduction in overall health risks,
  • and use of preventive care
defining workforce wellness2
Defining Workforce Wellness

Healthy Workforce Attributes cont.

  • ProductiveFunctioning to produce the maximum contribution to achieve personal goals and the organizational mission.
  • ReadyPossessing an ability to respond to changing demands given the increasing pace and unpredictable nature of work.
  • ResilientAdjusting to setbacks, increased demands, or unusual challenges and returning to optimal “well-being” and performance without major loss.
defining worksite wellness programs
Defining Worksite Wellness Programs
  • A comprehensive wellness program involves all employees, deals with all major health risks, offers choices, and targets both the employees and the worksite environment; and provides periodic evaluation of its results.
  • A comprehensive program emphasizes both individual assessment and follow-up, providing support for the employee as long as he/she is employed. Studies have shown this approach to be highly successful.
  • Key components are planning, leadership engagement, implementation, and evaluation. The goal now is much more results-driven, rather than activity-driven.
module 1 conclusions
Module 1: Conclusions
  • There is a crisis in wellness in our general population.
  • For many reasons, health and wellness belong at (and are very likely to remain in) the worksite. 
  • Supervisors need to know what health and wellness is and what constitutes a comprehensive Worksite Wellness program.
module 2 role of leadership
Module 2: Role of Leadership

Objective: Comprehend the critical role of agency leadership in successful implementation of health and wellness programs.

  • Why Emphasize Management Support and Buy-in?
  • Wellness Vision (create a culture of health)
  • Encourage Participation
  • Model Healthy Behaviors
why emphasize management support and buy in
Why Emphasize Management Support and Buy-in?
  • Management views on wellness send an important signal to the rest of the agency. Is wellness a legitimate aspect of everyday business operations or is it just something “nice to do” only with a downturn in workload?
  • What does it mean to create a culture of health?
    • Creating a culture of health that supports the health and well-being of employee’s means making it easier for employees to practice healthy lifestyles of their choosing.
    • Creating a culture of health is about removing barriers and creating wellness opportunities … it is not about telling employees how to live, but rather creating the environment that support people in their journey for health and happiness.
wellness vision create a culture of health
Wellness Vision (create a culture of health)

Supervisors will deploy numerous leadership skills in promoting worksite wellness, including the following critical competencies:

  • Take on role model and trainer responsibilities
  • Be held accountable and create accountability
  • Providing positive recognition
  • Develop strong team building
  • Set clear expectations
wellness vision create a culture of health1
Wellness Vision (create a culture of health)
  • Managers need to share a clear vision for wellness and demonstrate their commitment for encouraging employee health and well-being.
    • Sharing the vision across their entire span of control; and
    • Sharing the vision with front-line supervisors
    • Managers have a role in making the “healthy choice the easy choice” and role modeling healthy behavior.
    • Ask yourself: can an individual employee take charge of their personal health? Does the environment, policies, systems, and norms of an organization or unit allow for successful change?
slide21

Wellness Vision (create a culture of health)

Interactive Exercise: Key Questions to Examine

  • What if an employee decides to exercise more…but the deadlines never allow for complete breaks or lunch or there are no options for a flexible schedule? Is that the responsibility of the employee or the employer?
  • What if an employee decides to eat better…but the only food options in the vending machines or at ESD sponsored events are unhealthy choices? Is that the responsibility of the employee of the employer?
  • What if an employee decides it’s important to get an annual physical or an age appropriate preventive screening or stay home when they are sick … but the direct supervisor frowns upon taking sick leave due to current workload issues? What is the norm or culture that has been created here?
slide22

Wellness Vision (create a culture of health)

How Do You Know if Leadership is Successful?

  • A good barometer for testing whether the supervisor truly retains a vision of a wellness culture is through the lens of employee recruitment and retention.
    • Has the supervisor created enough of a linkage between ESD’s culture of workplace wellness and the core values of the prospective employee in all recruitment settings?
  • Key assessment tools include:
    • ESD’s strategic plan
    • Current internal wellness initiatives
    • Relevant policies and procedures
encourage participation
Encourage Participation
  • The supervisor also has a role to support direct staff engagement in specific wellness opportunities
  • ESD has numerous opportunities for employees to engage in, both big and small

Question: Do supervisors frown at those employees who choose to engage in such activities, or do they show active support for these efforts?

  • Remember one very IMPORTANT component of a high-performing workforce is the health status of your team
model healthy behaviors
Model Healthy Behaviors
  • This does not mean that the supervisor is expected to be an athlete, the most physically fit person in the workplace.
  • What it does mean is that the supervisor makes his/her personal wellness goals visible and finds ways to participate and incorporate wellness into your team’s business strategy.
  • These are actually simple tasks like taking your break, maybe include walking meetings, encourage healthy potlucks, or taking the stairs instead of the elevator.
  • It is important for you to take charge of your personal wellness both as a supervisor and as an employee.
slide25

Interactive: Key Questions for Yourself

  • Do I take physical activity breaks? Eat at my desk? Lose vacation time?
  • Do I as a manger encourage employees to take their lunch and breaks – especially when the job require repetitive and stressful work functions?
  • Am I seen at worksite wellness activities or events?
slide26

Interactive: Case Study Exercise:

The employee has been caring for an aging parent which has depleted almost all of his/her sick leave. She now needs to set up a series of doctor appointments to address his/her own high blood pressure. The unit norm in the past has been: “the less sick days taken the better”. In fact taking sick leave without running a fever just for preventive care is really frowned upon.

Ultimately, the employee does not feel supported in taking care of his/her personal health. What may be some natural consequences stemming from this kind of cultural norm in the workplace?

module 2 conclusions
Module 2: Conclusions
  • All of the topic areas in this Module share a common denominator – the critical role of communication & Leadership.
  • Constant communication is a critical feature of bona fide leadership to keep wellness on the front burner as an everyday and legitimate business activity for the agency.
module 3 health productivity for performance management
Module 3: Health & Productivity for Performance Management

Objective: Be conversant in connecting health and wellness with core business needs, most notably performance management.

  • Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment (hands-on data)
  • Linking Employee Development to Desired Business Outcomes
  • Wellness for Recruitment and Retention
  • ESD Tools and Resources for Health & Productivity Management
slide29

Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

  • Our personal and professional lives interface continually. Furthermore, if we do not address our health at work, our productivity and level of performance will be stunted
  • As an ESD supervisor you must know your customer demographics, needs, and the services you can provide them; but what about the workforce that is serving them?
  • What do you need to know about your employees in order to manage and serve them effectively?
knowing your workforce and changing environment
Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment
  • Datacollection and analysis are standard components in today's planning and design processes for successful performance management and workforce planning
  • There is much to learn from basic demographics and how it relates to performance. Note how health and well-being are linked to so many “metrics” (different aspects of data)
knowing your workforce and changing environment1
Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

Key metrics are numerous and include:

  • Employee demographics (age, race, ethnicity, sex)
  • Health claim utilization reports
  • Employee Assistance Program (EAP)utilization reports
  • Disability claims
  • Workers' compensation claims
  • Sick time, paid and unpaid time off
  • Employer’s safety and injury data
  • Health screenings (height, weight, body mass index, cholesterol and blood sugar levels)
  • Health Risk Assessment (HRA) data – self report survey
knowing your workforce and changing environment2
Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

Key Metrics cont.

  • Productivity/performance data
  • Recruitment and retention data
  • Employee interest surveys
  • Grievance rates
  • Social context (workload, seasonality, change in business strategy or staffing)
  • Physical environmental scan (vending, walk ability, bike racks, showers and lockers,)
  • Environmental hazards and health hazards
slide33

Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

How is ESD Leadership Using Basic Demographic Data?

  • 2,017 total ESD employees*
  • 1,768 (88%) permanent employees
    • 612 (35%) are in UI division, many at TeleCenters
    • 681 (39%) are in WSOD, many at WorkSource Centers
  • Some risks are associated with gender/age
    • 65% female –35% male
    • 20% of the female population are of child-bearing age
    • 42% under age 50
    • 58% age 50+

* As of 12-31-08 - this number has increased considerably since that time

slide35

Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

Health Survey – Key Results

Employees who participated in these health screenings reported that:

  • More than half got information that they did not already know
  • Two out of three took some action based on the information they got in their Personal Health Report
  • 86% of participating employees agree that ESD should continue to develop the wellness program
knowing your workforce and changing environment context esd s workload is increasing
Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment Context: ESD’s Workload is Increasing

Beginning of Wellness Project

knowing your workforce and changing environment3
Knowing your Workforce and Changing Environment

Interactive Exercise:

Have employees work in small groups to brainstorm together two issues:

  • how to find this type of data across the agency; and
  • what kind of analysis can be done with demographic data?
linking employee development to desired business outcomes
Linking Employee Development to Desired Business Outcomes

Each one of the data points discussed represents your workforce and their ability or inability to achieve the desired business outcome of your unit.

>> How can you use the data in day to day management?

Example: Mothers are the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. labor force. Several studies indicate that support for lactation at work benefits individual families as well as employers via improved productivity and staff loyalty; enhanced public image of the employer; and decreased absenteeism, health care costs, and employee turnover.

Conclusion: A healthy mother has a healthy baby. A healthy baby has a happy and healthy mother. A happy mother is a productive employee.

linking employee development to desired business outcomes1
Linking Employee Development to Desired Business Outcomes

Interactive: After reviewing the data of the ESD workforce and workplace think about the following questions and what changes you might make to your unit culture or environment.

Key Questions to Examine

  • What is the average age of my unit? What risks follow that age cohort? What might ensure fuller and timely use of age-appropriate preventive care and screenings?
  • How many male vs. female? What risks follow gender? What might ensure gender appropriate preventive care and screenings?
  • What are the impacts of stress during times of change, increased workload, business strategy, and transition?
linking employee development to desired business outcomes2
Linking Employee Development to Desired Business Outcomes

Key Questions to Examine cont.

  • How could I increase physical activity opportunities for my staff in an effort to reduce stress and prevent longer-term illness? Do I have the ability to offer flexible schedules?
  • What specific ESD wellness activities would help my unit?
  • Do I have a high number of women of childbearing age? How much maternity leave will they need? How will we handle the workload? When they return from maternity leave is there a transition plan? What does the agency provide or my unit provide for working mothers?
linking employee development to desired business outcomes3
Linking Employee Development to Desired Business Outcomes

As a manager can you see overall opportunities for improvement in your workforce in any of the following areas?

  • Healthy: demonstrating optimal health status as defined by positive health behaviors, minimal modifiable risk factors, and minimal illnesses, diseases, and injuries
  • Productive: functioning to produce the maximum contribution to achievement of personal goals and the organizational mission
  • Ready: possessing an ability to respond to changing demands given the increasing pace and unpredictable nature of work and
  • Resilient:adjusting to setbacks, increased demands, or unusual challenges and returning to optimal “well-being” and performance without major loss
wellness for recruitment retention
Wellness for Recruitment & Retention
  • Many believe that money is the biggest drive or motivator . "The presence of money is a condition of work, and its absence is a demotivator," says Alan Weiss, an executive coach in East Greenwich, R.I. "But if you give more money to an unhappy employee, you merely have a wealthier, unhappy employee.“
  • Every person has different reasons for working. The reasons for working are as individual as the person. But, we all work because we obtain something that we need from work. That “something” obtained from work positively impacts:
    • Morale
    • Employee motivation
    • Quality of life
wellness for recruitment retention1
Wellness for Recruitment & Retention

Wellness programs are not only a way to help contain healthcare costs and manage productivity, but they also play a role in the recruitment and retention of talented employees.

How do you keep and get the best employees?

  • By understanding what it is employees really want
  • Recruiting and retaining new employees, especially for those under the age of 40, requires more than just demonstrating good wages and benefits
  • Younger workers are keenly interested in other aspects of workplace life, including attitudes toward wellness; gym memberships, interpersonal relationships, and flex time
  • Protect the health of your workforce while they are on the job so they can take it home to their family and friends
wellness for recruitment retention2
Wellness for Recruitment & Retention
  • Employees want to feel they’re appreciated, which requires the manager be able to demonstrate this in a natural and ongoing way.
    • Note: This is not simply giving employees recognition awards at the once-a-year picnic. It means speaking from the heart and letting the employee know they matter to you and are noticed in an ongoing way.
    • Being supportive of personal health management is one way a supervisor can show they truly care and want to protect the health of their employees?

By tuning into what your employees really want, and meeting this need, your chances of hiring and keeping the best will be greatly improved.

esd tools and resources for health productivity management
ESD Tools and Resources for Health & Productivity Management
  • Policies
  • Guidelines for incentives, state computers, internet, using outside vendors (i.e., massage, yoga, etc), and work time use for wellness
  • Healthy Vending Options
  • Healthy Meeting Nutritional Standards
  • Personal Health benefits
  • Ergonomic Assessments
  • Activities & Resources:
    • ESD Wellness Website (Limeade)
    • On-site Health Screenings
    • Online Health Risk Assessments (HRA)
    • Healthy Quarters
    • LiveWell Disease management workshops
    • Weight watchers at work
    • Governor’s Health Bowl
    • Flu Clinics
slide46

ESD Tools and Resources for Health & Productivity Management

  • Use of Performance Evaluations - talk with Human Resources
    • Have you discussed options with the employee, i.e., health benefit coverage, preventive care, flexible work schedule, and ESD resources?
    • What do you know about your employee’s health, for example, could it be causing negative behavior?
  • Reasonable Accommodations
    • Discuss temporary reasonable accommodation here (personal wellness action planning for staying healthy).
    • Discuss HIPPA laws and confidentiality here as well.
  • Employee Assistance Program 
    • The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) helps employees and their family members resolve personal or work-related problems. http://www.dop.wa.gov/eap/Pages/default.aspx
  • Ergonomics – talk with Risk Management
    • Ensuring that assessments are done in a timely way with new employees and at least on-demand by existing employees (Note possible implications for job analysis)
esd tools and resources for health productivity management1
ESD Tools and Resources for Health & Productivity Management

Washington Wellness The goal of Washington Wellness is to make healthy choices easier for state employees, retirees, and family members. They provide resources like:

Take Advantage of your Benefits

  • Talk to your doctor about your risks and conditions
  • Learn what benefits your medical plans offer to help manage those conditions

Discover more Resources

  • Check out other great resources specific to employees, retirees, and family members including the Fitness Club Discount Program

For more detailed information and technical assistance please contact: Angela Campbell, ESD Health & Productivity Coordinator

module 3 conclusions
Module 3: Conclusions
  • Knowing your workforce and changing environment is critical aspect to basic supervision.
  • Linking employee development to desired business outcomes is the core of understanding how health and productivity are bound together.
  • The Gen X and Y crowd have different needs than the generation that constitutes the majority of ESD employees. Is ESD ready to recruit and retain the 40 and under crowd with success?
thank you
Thank You!

VIC COLMAN

360.878.2543

vicsolutions@comcast.net

ROBBI KAY NORMAN

360.556.4630

robbisolutions@comcast.net