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Park Smart: Best Parking Practices for Your Main Street

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  1. Park Smart: Best Parking Practicesfor Your Main Street May 29, 2014

  2. PARK SMART: BEST PARKING PRACTICES FOR YOUR MAIN STREET Carolyn Dellutri, CMSMSenior Director of Programs and ServicesNational Main Street Center

  3. PARK SMART: BEST PARKING PRACTICES FOR YOUR MAIN STREET Questions during the webinar? Email Hannah at hwhite@savingplaces.org and we’ll try and cover them at the end of the session. Hannah WhiteMembership CoordinatorNational Main Street Center

  4. PRESENTERS Stephen J. Rebora, RAPresidentDESMAN Associates Mr. Rebora is the President of DESMAN Associates which specializes in the design, restoration, and planning of parking structures. He is a licensed architect and has been an integral part of the parking design and planning industry for over 25 years. As such, his works have been published by the NPA, The Urban Land Institute, and Architectural Record. During Mr. Rebora’s tenure with DESMAN, he has been involved with hundreds of projects which have largely focused on the design of new parking structures. Christian Luz, AICPPrincipalDESMAN Associates Mr. Luz is a Principal with DESMAN Associates and leads their South Florida office. He has a BS in Civil and Environmental Engineering and a MS in Civil Engineering specializing in Planning. Mr. Luz is also a registered professional engineer and a certified planner. He has extensive experience in the conduct of a wide variety of transportation planning, parking studies, functional design and design/build, and financial feasibility studies.

  5. PARK SMART: BEST PARKING PRACTICES FOR YOUR MAIN STREET • Shared Parking • Sustainability • Rates and Time Limits

  6. SHARED PARKING – Principles and Practice • Definitions • Shared(sher’d) n. – to receive, use, experience, endure, etc. in common with another or others • Parking(park’n) vt. – to maneuver (a vehicle) into a space where it can be left temporarily • Shared Parking – a parking space that can be used to serve two or more individuals land uses without conflict or encroachment

  7. SHARED PARKING – Principles and Practice • Importance and Relevance • Reduces amount of land devoted to parking thereby allowing greater development density or green space • Reduces the number of spaces required thereby reducing construction and maintenance cost • Increases communication and coordination between individual business and between the business community and the municipality (mutual need and benefit)

  8. SHARED PARKING – Essential Components Land Use - The way land is developed and used in terms of the types of activities allowed (agriculture, residential, retail, etc.) and the size of buildings and structures permitted Mixed-Use - Properties on which various uses, i.e. office, commercial, and residential are combined in a single building or on a single site in an integrated development project with significant functional interrelationships and coherent physical design.

  9. SHARED PARKING – Essential Components Variations - There are variations in the peak accumulation of parked vehicles as the result of different activity patterns of adjacent or nearby land uses Office Accumulation Pattern Restaurant Accumulation Pattern

  10. SHARED PARKING – Principles and Practice Gather and review project data Select base parking ratios Adjust ratios for auto use demographics Determine hourly accumulation patterns Determine seasonality Define operations/management strategy Calculate hourly and peak parking demand

  11. SHARED PARKING – Practices Select base parking ratios Adjust ratios for auto use demographics

  12. SHARED PARKING – Practices Select base parking ratios Adjust ratios for auto use demographics

  13. SHARED PARKING – Practices Determine hourly accumulation patterns

  14. SHARED PARKING – Practices Determine hourly accumulation patterns

  15. SHARED PARKING – Practices Define operations/management strategy • Sensitivity to local issues • Enforcement • Type of access/revenue control • Rates and Fees • Permits and validations • Hours of operation • Combined management (public & private sector) • Planning and zoning “buy in”

  16. SHARED PARKING – Practices Calculate hourly and peak parking demand

  17. SHARED PARKING – Practices

  18. SHARED PARKING – Practices Calculate hourly and peak parking demand

  19. SHARED PARKING – A Starting Point • Three examples that can serve as a starting point for a shared-use agreement: • City of San Diego, CA • Town of Cary, NC • Municipality of Anchorage, AK • Available for download in the: • National Main Street Center Resource Library

  20. SUSTAINABILITY - Mission “Our firm is set up to encourage the creative process, to share ideas and talents among all of our offices and deliver an exceptional end product to our clients. DESMAN embraces diversity and is committed to provide excellence in the design of parking facilities, rehabilitation programs for existing structures and innovative parking studies for all market sectors. Internally we strive to enrich the lives of our employees and embrace personal values. We care about serving our clients, and improving the communities in which we work. Our enduring client relationships reflect our ongoing commitment to the principles of collaboration, partnership and hard work.”

  21. SUSTAINABILITY – LEED Focused

  22. SUSTAINABILITY – LEED Focused

  23. SUSTAINABILITY – LEED Focused

  24. SUSTAINABILITY – LEED Focused

  25. SUSTAINABILITY – Cost Savings

  26. SUSTAINABILITY – Cost Savings

  27. SUSTAINABILITY – Durability

  28. SUSTAINABILITY – Durability

  29. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  30. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  31. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  32. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  33. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  34. SUSTAINABILITY – Adaptive Reuse

  35. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Let’s Get on the Same Page • Assumption - we are targeting on-street parking located in the core of downtown. • Goal - we want to prioritize on-street, proximal short-term parking for customers: • managing the length of time a space can be used; and • providing access to available on-street parking spaces. • Solution - we have two primary methods of achieving this goal: • charge for parking; or • implement maximum time limits with or without parking charges.

  36. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Definitions Turnover – the number of times a parking space is used, typically throughout the course of the day. This term can also be applied to a block face or group of parking spaces. Duration – the length of time a parker remains in a parking space. Time-limited – setting the length of time a parker can remain in a space. Time-limited parking may apply to free, on-street spaces as well as spaces that are metered. Rates – herein refers to a rate schedule that may represent any number of permutations that include by the hour, by time of day, by day of week. Also herein, we are discussing (primarily) use of on-street single and multi-space meters.

  37. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Managing Parking Behavior • On-Street Parking Policy • On-street parking dedicated to customer use • Maximum time limits related to location of off-street parking • Make ticket writers parking personnel not police • Parking fines captured in parking fund • Maintain cost and revenue in parking fund • Base rate of schedule has direct relationship to the cost to provide parking • Parking Benefit Districts - look for revenue sharing opportunities with “shy” business or neighborhood communities

  38. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Managing Parking Behavior • Off-Street Parking Policy • For employee and daily parkers typically > 2-3 hours in duration • Maintain cost and revenue in parking fund • Hourly rates should be less (typically about ¾ the on-street hourly rate) • Daily cost to park about ½ to ¾ of comparable on-street cost • Employee parking facilities – public or private with “safe walk” routes

  39. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Managing Parking Behavior • Generalities • Rates - should be consistent with the cost to provide “sustainable” parking • Example - Old Pasadena • Today 1,200 parking meters generate $1.5 million in revenue. • The city reinvests a portion of the parking meter revenue into infrastructure improvements • The rest goes to pay the city’s share of the cost of a business improvement district which uses its funds to care for and market the area • There is no real “base rate” for different size cities, it’s dependent on your competition and the attraction of the destination • NPA and Colliers conduct national parking rate surveys

  40. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Managing Parking Behavior • Generalities • Experience tells us it is difficult to manage parking behavior at rates less than $0.50 per hour • Most common method to determine rates (aside from creating a self-sustaining rate structure) is to conduct a peer city survey • Fines - Most duration studies tell us about 75% or more of parking durations are 2 hours or less • Overtime parking fines should be in proportion to the actual cost to pay for parking • If free, the overtime fine needs to be a disincentive to parking on-street for trips over 2 hours • Escalating fines within 6 month time period, $35, $75, $150.

  41. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Managing Parking Behavior What is the value of a parking space?

  42. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Customer Friendly • Validation Programs • Wide variety ofvalidation programs for merchants, employees and customers • Combined with metered parking can provide unlimited opportunities • Pay by mobile phone apps

  43. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Customer Friendly • Boulder, CO example - When you patronize a business, check with the staff to see if they participate in the validation or token programs. • Validation • Half-hour books contain 200 stamps for $100 with a max. of 4 stamps or 2 hours of free parking for each ticket. Stamps are applied to the first 2 hours of parking. • One hour books contain 100 stamps for $75 with a max. of 1 stamp or 1 hour of free parking for each ticket. Stamp is applied to the first hour of parking. • Meter Tokens • When you patronize a business, check with the staff to see if they participate in the token program. • Tokens come in rolls of 50 for $9.50/roll, each token is worth 12 minutes of parking • Tokens for personal use or employee parking cost $12.50/roll

  44. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Employee Parking Abuse • Managing “free, time limited” parking and employee abuse • Ordinance • Standard ordinance to prohibit “shuffling” on block face • Aggressive ordinance that prohibits shuffling within an area • Enforcement • Labor – chalk tires, record license plates • Technology – ALPR systems • Fines/Penalties • Forgiving approach • Escalating fines for habitual abusers • Employee alternatives • Incentivize employee off-street parking • Consider on-street parking permits • Coordinate solutions through business associations • Safe walk program

  45. RATES & TIME LIMITS – Employee Parking Abuse

  46. PRESENTERS Stephen J. Rebora, RAPresidentDESMAN Associates srebora@desman.com Q&A Christian Luz, AICPPrincipalDESMAN Associates cluz@desman.com

  47. PRESENTERS Thank you! Stay tuned for the next installment of the National Main Street Center Innovation Lab and send us your ideas for future topics to mainstreet@savingplaces.org!