language arts grade 11 week 14 lesson 2 3 n.
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Language Arts Grade 11 Week 14 Lesson 2-3

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Language Arts Grade 11 Week 14 Lesson 2-3

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  1. Language Arts Grade 11 Week 14 Lesson 2-3 Standard E1a: READING: Word Recognition, Fluency, and Vocabulary Development - Word Recognition involves the understanding of the basic features of words: word parts, patterns, relationships, and origins. Standard E2a: WRITING: Process - The writing process includes prewriting, drafting, editing, and revising. Students progress through these stages to write clear, coherent, and focused paragraphs and essays. Classwork: Morphemes Part 6 – Flash Card Review Thematic Essay #2 “LOST” - Write the Rough Draft Punctuation Lesson: Dialogue / Quotations Homework: Finish any previously assigned class work/homework. Assessment: Observation, Oral responses, Written Responses

  2. Punctuating Dialogue Never make a mistake again!

  3. Quotation Marks • “Fred, I want you to take that new truck back to the dealership,” Mary snarled, “right now!” • “No way will you get me to,” Fred paused, “ return that truck.” Only the words spoken are surrounded by quotation marks.

  4. Keep commas and periods inside the quotation marks • “ I do not know,” yelled Albert. • Albert yelled, “I do not know.” Which one is correct? • The teacher screamed, “Everyone needs to line up at the door”. • The teacher screamed, “Everyone needs to line up at the door.”

  5. An uninterrupted speech needs quotation marks only at the beginning and the end. • “My mother was right. I never should have married you. You only ever think of yourself and I’m always the one who has to suffer.” • “Oh cry me a river.” ” I’m the one who came out on the losing end of this marriage!” “Why didn’t you listen to your mother?” Which one is correct?

  6. Start a new paragraph each time the speaker changes. • “You can be so cruel some times!” Mary wailed. • “Oh I suppose you’ll go crying to your mother now,” Fred sighed. • “At least she understands me,” sobbed Mary.

  7. When only two people are talking you do not have to keep using their names. • “I understand how you feel, alright?” • “You do?” • “Aw, you know I do.” • “And do you care about me?” • “Of course I do.” • “So you’ll take the truck back?” • “Over my dead body!”

  8. Quote inside of a quote • Use single quotation marks for quotes within quotes. • This also includes publications that are set off by quotes. • Example: He said, "Danea said, 'Do not treat me that way.'" • Example: "Everyone will read the short story entitled ‘The Escape' for tomorrow," said the substitute teacher.

  9. Exclamations and Questions • An exclamation point or question mark is placed inside the quotation marks when it punctuates the quotation. It is placed outside when it punctuates the main sentence. • For example: • I almost fell over when he asked, “That won’t be a problem for you, will it?” • Did the teacher really say, “Finish by tomorrow”?