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  1. Giving students the skills they need: who does what, and how? Dr Alison Grieg: Global Sustainability Institute Ella Wiles: Global Sustainability Institute Dr Julian Priddle: Anglia Learning & Teaching Sarah Janes: Student Services, Employability Jane Murray: Student Services, Employability Gabbi Foreman: Students’ Union

  2. CBI and NUS 2011 Working towards your future Making the most of your time in higher education CBI

  3. CBI and NUS 2011 Working towards your future Making the most of your time in higher education CBI

  4. CBI and NUS 2011 Working towards your future Making the most of your time in higher education CBI

  5. http://www.employability.ed.ac.uk/GraduateAttributes.htm

  6. Graduate attributes ‘Graduate attributes are the qualities, skills and understandings a university community agrees its students should develop during their time with the institution. These attributes include but go beyond the disciplinary expertise or technical knowledge that has traditionally formed the core of most university courses. They are qualities that also prepare graduates as agents of social good in an unknown future.’ Bowden J, Hart G, King B, Trigwell K & Watts O 2000 Generic Capabilities of ATN University Graduates. Canberra: Australian Government Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs.

  7. http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/article/widening_the_graduate_attribute_debate_a_higher_education_for_global_citize/http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/article/widening_the_graduate_attribute_debate_a_higher_education_for_global_citize/

  8. Abstract There is more to life than simply doing a job. The graduates of our higher education system will be more than employees/ employers, they will also be future leaders in our world and our neighbours and so affect our lives at all levels. What do we want these people to be like? This paper considers the idea of educating global citizens and offers suggestions for possible graduate attributes, ……. http://bejlt.brookes.ac.uk/article/widening_the_graduate_attribute_debate_a_higher_education_for_global_citize/

  9. The current research findings reinforce the conclusions of the 2010 research. Overall, the results for first and second-year students in 2011 showed no notable differences except where these are mentioned explicitly throughout the report. The research demonstrated the following key findings: • Over two thirds of 2011 first and second-year respondents (66.6% and 70.3% respectively), as in 2010 (70%), believe that sustainability should be covered by their university; • There is a continued preference among students for a reframing of curriculum content rather than additional content or courses however this needs to be considered amongst the range of options available to policy makers and curriculum planners for incorporating sustainability into their individual university’s curriculum (65% stated this method was extremely relevant or somewhat relevant in 2010 and 67.4% of first-years and 69% second-years agreed in 2011); • There is evidence to suggest that students become increasingly focused on employability throughout their time at university. Second-year students (49.7%) expressed a slight preference for employability over furthering their subject specific knowledge.The situation is reversed among 2010 (47%) and 2011 (46.9%) first-year responses, indicating that first-year students are considering employability less within their university experience; • In terms of the skills seen as valuable by future employers, a wider range of core skills are seen as most important, relevant and valued by future employers rather than sustainability-specific skills which suggests a need to reframe the debates surrounding inclusion of education for sustainabledevelopment (ESD) (eg 17.8% of second-years in 2011 ranked the ability apply environmental and social skills as most important for employers compared to 53.4% ranking communication skills as most important); • Alongside this, further work is needed with the business community to communicate the tangible benefits of ESD more widely, and to identify the most valuable skills, to ensure skills for SD are valued and demanded. • A role for communication of company ethics and environmental performance exists throughout the student journey: two thirds of respondents would sacrifice £1,000 from salary to work in a responsible company. Drayson R, Bone E & Agombar A 2012 Student attitudes towards and skills for sustainable development HEA

  10. There is evidence to suggest that students become increasingly focused on employability throughout their time at university. Second-year students (49.7%) expressed a slight preference for employability over furthering their subject specific knowledge.The situation is reversed among 2010 (47%) and 2011 (46.9%) first-year responses, indicating that first-year students are considering employability less within their university experience; Drayson R, Bone E & Agombar A 2012 Student attitudes towards and skills for sustainable development HEA

  11. Over two thirds of 2011 first and second-year respondents (66.6% and 70.3% respectively), as in 2010 (70%), believe that sustainability should be covered by their university; Drayson R, Bone E & Agombar A 2012 Student attitudes towards and skills for sustainable development HEA

  12. There is a continued preference among students for a reframing of curriculum content rather than additional content or courses however this needs to be considered amongst the range of options available to policy makers and curriculum planners for incorporating sustainability into their individual university’s curriculum (65% stated this method was extremely relevant or somewhat relevant in 2010 and 67.4% of first-years and 69% second-years agreed in 2011); Drayson R, Bone E & Agombar A 2012 Student attitudes towards and skills for sustainable development HEA

  13. http://www.cdu.edu.au/graduateattributes/index.html

  14. http://www.cdu.edu.au/graduateattributes/index.html

  15. http://www.cdu.edu.au/graduateattributes/carp.html

  16. Do students get the skills that they need? • National Student Survey (NSS) 2011 Results Positive, particularly Q.1-4 and online service provision. • Student Experience Survey (SES) 2011 Results PoorSustainability outlook

  17. Do students get the skills that they need?

  18. Student Skills Survey Asked: Students what sustainability skills and attributes are important and where they look to receive these skills from Asked about 11 skills/attributes developed from Change Agents i.e. Ability to assess and critique information sources, Capable of engaging in self-assessment, self reflection and analysis, Understanding of how to act as a responsible citizen 280 students surveyed across Cambridge & Chelmsford in all 4 faculties, both UG and PG

  19. Student Skills Survey:all questions Extremely important Neutral Very important Rating current importance

  20. Student Skills Survey:all questions Extremely important Very important Rating importance on graduation

  21. Student Skills Survey:all questions Extremely important Very important Rating importance for employment

  22. Student Skills Survey:individual questions

  23. Student Skills Survey:individual questions

  24. Student Skills Survey:individual questions

  25. Student Skills Survey: • Students clearly appreciated the values of the skills covered by the survey • Skills were seen as more important in employment than currently

  26. Student Skills Survey:all questions Wider life outside University Throughout my Course In a specific module University Clubs and Societies Where do you acquire these skills?

  27. Student Skills Survey:individual questions Q9 Q10 Q7 Q5 Q4 Q3 Q11 Q8 Q1 Q6 Q2 Very wide variation in perception

  28. Student Skills Survey: • Students saw most skills acquisition happening outside the curriculum • Huge variation in the importance of the curriculum for acquiring skills

  29. Employability Strategy 2012-14 • To further enhance our reputation as a leading national institution for student Employability • To increase the visibility of employability within our academic, support service and student culture • To raise students awareness of the need to experience and learn from a wide range of opportunities to develop and practice high level employability skills • To support students in taking responsibility for their personal, professional and academic development. • To increase the range and availability of student real-world work experience opportunities, develop an enterprise and entrepreneurship culture and increase the quality depth and range of work with employers

  30. Examples of good practice 2. To increase the visibility of employability within our academic, support service and student culture • ES delivered induction/introduction talks to a large number of first year students in core lectures between weeks 4-6 academic year 2012-13. • We will be rolling this out with the support of academic colleagues cross faculty in ALL first year core modules this coming year • Developed employability guides for students and academic staff. • Including Student Employability time line to help students manage the way they develop their employability • ES Consulted at ALSS departmental employability strategy meetings lead by the Deputy Dean to continue to work towards embedding employability into the curriculum for academic year 2013-14. • Recommendation: A minimum of one employability session/event per year group, per semester to be included in all courses.

  31. 3. To raise students awareness of the need to experience and learn from a wide range of opportunities to develop and practice high level employability skills. • All first year students provided with Employability Guides via their personal tutors. • 77 employer/student events run Aug 2012 – April 2013 • Careers in ………days. Ran a number of days focusing on professional areas such as Law. Invited speakers from national and regional law firms, barristers chambers and support groups to give real life-story experiences.

  32. 4. To support students in taking responsibility for their personal, professional and academic development. • All final year students offered the opportunity to engage with ES to ensure they were are and able to articulate evidence of their employability skills • Created an employability portal within VLE which is accessible to all students. Offer practical advise and guidance as well as advertising jobs and work placement opportunities.

  33. 5. To increase the range and availability of student real-world work experience opportunities, develop an enterprise and entrepreneurship culture and increase the quality depth and range of work with employers Citrix Experience Project Computing and Technology students work as part of Citrix Team which suit their area of interest. They took part in real-life project for half a day for 6 weeks. The focus of each project ranged from programming, to testing the latest cloud products. At the end of the 6 week project, pairs took part in a poster presentation and showcased their work to senior contacts at Citrix.

  34. Throughout the Citrix Experience Programme, students are supported by a Citrix mentor and will take part in a number of skills workshops, such as presentation training. • Worked closely with Anglia Ruskin Enterprise and Entrepreneurship department to offer workshops and specialist information. • Start up Britain Campaign bus visit. A national government backed campaign to help raise awareness amongst students and young people as well as advising on financial support packages Current developments in employability support – centrally provided versus embedded in curriculum – signposting skills in the curriculum – evidencing skills – Anglia Award and HEAR