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Ap eng iii bellwork. Bellwork : Day 3. Prepare to set up your ENG III notebook. Label your notebook dividers as follows: 1. General Information / Journal Writing 2. Learning Target Logs 3. Grammar 4. Vocabulary 5. Reading 6. Writing

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bellwork day 3
Bellwork: Day 3

Prepare to set up your ENG III notebook.

Label your notebook dividers as follows:

1. General Information / Journal Writing

2. Learning Target Logs

3. Grammar

4. Vocabulary

5. Reading

6. Writing

If you only have five tabbed dividers make a label for

all of the above but General Information.

ap bellwork day 4
AP Bellwork Day 4

COPY EACH OF THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES. PROOFREAD THE SENTENCE AND WRITE IT CORRECTLY.

  • I worked this weekend for a entire day just getting ready for this week.
  • I ain’t sure all the work was worth it.
  • I had to wash clothes, cook meals, shop for groceries, and etc.
  • I did everything accept enjoy myself.
  • Sadly, the affect is that I am extremely tired.
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AP Bellwork 09/19/11

Pick up the handout entitled “Glossary of Usage Terms Week Four” from the bookcase by the door. Please read and be ready to discuss.

ap bellwork 09 26 11
AP Bellwork 09/26/11

Study five minutes for Vocabulary Quiz 5.

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AP Bellwork 09/27/11

Prepare for The Crucible final essay. Have paper, moments sheet, book and writing utensil on your desk and be ready to begin writing.

slide7
AP Bellwork 09/28/11Copy the following rules about commas and place them in the Grammar section of your notebook.

COMMAS

Commas are necessary for clear expression of ideas.

Rule 1: Use commas to separate items in a series.

(A) If all items in a series are joined by and or or (nor), you should not use commas to separate them.

(B) Independent clauses in a series are usually separated by semicolons. Short independent clauses, however, may be separated by commas.

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AP Bellwork 09/28/11

Rule 1: Use commas to separate items in a series.

WORDS IN A SERIES

The counselor distributed baseballs, bats, volleyballs, tennis rackets, and bandages to the campers. [nouns]

The dog growled, snarled, and leaped at the intruder. [verbs]

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AP Bellwork 09/28/11

Rule 1: Use commas to separate items in a series.

PHRASES IN A SERIES

We have a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.

SUBORDINATE CLAUSES IN A SERIES

I know I will pass the test if I take good notes, if I study hard, and if I get a good night’s sleep.

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AP Bellwork 09/28/11

NOTE: When the last two items in a series are joined by and, you may omit the comma before the and if the comma is not necessary to make the meaning clear.

CLEAR The entertainers sang, danced and juggled.

UNCLEAR John, Sue and Many went fishing. [Not clear with comma omitted. Is John part of the series, or is he being addressed?]

CLEAR John, Sue and Mary went fishing.

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AP Bellwork 09/28/11
  • If all items in a series are joined by and or or (nor), you should not use commas to separate them.

EXAMPLES

We ran and walked and even limped to the finish line.

A volunteer addresses envelopes or answers phones or files correspondence.

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AP Bellwork 09/28/11

(B) Independent clauses in a series are usually separated by semicolons. Short independent clauses, however, may be separated by commas.

EXAMPLES

For physical fitness we swam twenty-five laps in the pool; we jogged four miles around the lake; and we exercised with workout equipment in Pam’s basement.

For physical fitness we swam, we jogged, and we exercised.

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AP Bellwork 09/29/11Copy the following rules about commas and place them in the Grammar section of your notebook.

COMMAS

Rule 2: Use commas to separate two or more adjectives preceding a noun.

EXAMPLE The accident was a frightening, horrible sight.

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AP Bellwork 09/29/11

When the last adjective bore the noun is thought of as part of the noun, the comma before the adjective is omitted.

EXAMPLE The new elementary school will be completed in 2016.

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AP Bellwork 09/29/11

To determine whether it is right to put commas between two adjectives in a series of adjectives modifying a noun, substitute the word and for the doubtful comma. If the and sounds wrong, then you don’t need a comma.

PROBLEM I cautiously raised my broken right hand in response. [Comma before right?]

USE AND I cautiously raised my broken and right hand in response. [Obviously wrong!]

SOLUTION I cautiously raised my broken right hand in response. [No comma.]

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AP Bellwork 09/30/11

Please pick up the handout entitled, “Commas Exercise One” from the bookcase. Complete on your own.

slide17
AP Bellwork 10/03/11Copy the following rule(s) about commas and place them in the Grammar section of your notebook.

Rule 3: Use a comma before and, but, or, nor, for, so and yet when they join independent clauses.

EXAMPLES: Patrick brought the hot dogs and buns, and Cindy brought the potato salad.

We were there on time, but Jeff and Maria arrived late.

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AP Bellwork 10/03/11

NOTE: Independent clauses joined by and, but, or, or nor need not be separated by a comma when they are very short. If the clauses are joined by the conjunctions yet, so, or for, they must be separated by a comma.

EXAMPLES The poodle tensed and the German shepherd growled.

[Clauses are too short to require commas.]

We sprayed with insecticide, yet the bugs still found us.

[Clauses are short but are separated by the conjunction yet. Therefore, a comma is required.]

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AP Bellwork 10/04/11
  • Pick up the handout from the bookcase and complete. Fold in half, upon completion.
slide20
AP Bellwork 10/05/11Copy the following rule(s) about commas and place them in the Grammar section of your notebook.

Rule 4: Use commas to set off nonessential clauses and nonessential participial phrases.

NONESSENTIAL CLAUSE:

A subordinate clause (dependent clause that does not express a complete thought and cannot stand by itself) that is not essential to the meaning of the sentence.

NONESSENTIAL PARTICIPIAL PHRASE:

A PARTICIPLE is a verb form that can be used as an adjective. PRESENT PARTICIPLES consist of the plain form of the verb plus –ing.

PAST PARTICIPLE consist of the plain verb form of the verb plus –d or –ed. A few are formed irregularly.

A PARTICIPIAL PHRASE consists of a participial and its related words, such as modifiers and complements, all of which act together as an adjective.

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AP Bellwork 10/05/11

Nonessential clauses serve only to add some extra information or to explain something further; they could be omitted without altering the fundamental meaning of the sentence.

An essential clause , on the other hand, is one that cannot be omitted without changing the meaning of the sentence.

NONESSENTIAL Peter Lincoln, who works with my father, bought a new Corvette yesterday.

Since you know without the clause who it was that bought a new Corvette yesterday, the clause is not necessary to identify Peter Lincoln; it merely adds information about him. It is a nonessential clauses and should be set off by commas.

NOTE: Most adjective clauses that modify PROPER nouns are nonessential and require commas.

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AP Bellwork 10/05/11

ESSENTIAL All the books that are damaged go in these boxes.

The clause that are damaged is essential because it tells which books go in the boxes. Omitting the clause would change the meaning of the sentence into something absurd. Since the clause is an integral, or essential, part of the sentence , it is not set off by commas.

NOTE: Adjective clauses introduced by that are almost always essential.

EXAMPLES The friend whom I invited to the beach could not come. [essential]

Kelly, whom I invited to the beach, could not come.

[nonessential]

The U.S. President who enjoyed turkey hash on waffles for breakfast was Andrew Jackson. [essential]

Andrew Jackson, who was a U.S. President, enjoyed turkey hash on waffles for breakfast. [nonessential]

The meal that I like the bestis spaghetti. [ essential]

Spaghetti, which I like best, is our meal tonight.

[nonessential]

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AP Bellwork 10/05/11

At times the writer of a sentence is the only one who knows whether a clause is nonessential (commas) or essential (no commas). To make the meaning clear, the writer will either use commas to enclose the clause of abstain from their issue.

NONESSENTIAL My sister, who attends Duke University, sent me a college sweatshirt.

[The clause is not needed to identify this sister. Since it is nonessential, it requires commas.]

ESSENTIAL My sister who attends Duke University sent me a college sweatshirt.

[The writer knows he or she has more than one sister. The clause is necessary to tell which sister he or she is talking about. It should not be set off by commas.]

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AP Bellwork 10/05/11

The same principles govern participial phrases. Recall the two kinds of participles: present participles ending in –ing and past participles usually ending in –ed. When a participial phrase is nonessential, the phrase is set off by commas. When it is essential, no commas are used.

NONESSENTIAL Esther, running at a slow and leisurely pace, easily finished the marathon.

ESSENTIAL The woman running at a slow, leisurely pace easily finished the marathon.

NONESSENTIAL Vicky’s silk-screen, wrapped carefully inside a cardboard box, arrived today.

ESSENTIAL The silk-screen wrapped carefully inside a cardboard box was not damaged.

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AP Bellwork 10/06/11

Pick up the handout entitled “Commas: Exercise 3” from the bookcase. Complete on your own. Fold your paper in half, upon completion.

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AP Bellwork 10/07/11

Study five minutes for Vocabulary test.

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AP Bellwork 10/10/11
  • Pickup handout from bookcase and complete. Fold your paper in half when finished and wait QUIETYLY at your seat (that means you Dustin) for instructions.

Commas Exercise 2x

slide28
AP Bellwork10/11/11Copy the following rule(s) about commas and place them in the Grammar section of your notebook.

Rule 5: Use comma after certain introductory elements.

  • Use a comma after words such as well, yes, no and why when they begin a sentence. Exclamations like wow, good grief, and gee whiz, if not followed by an exclamation point, must also be set off by commas.
  • Use a comma after an introductory participial phrase.
  • Use a comma after a succession of introductory prepositional phrases.
  • Use a comma after an introductory adverb clause.
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AP Bellwork10/11/11

Rule 5: Use comma after certain introductory elements.

  • Use a comma after words such as well, yes, no and why when they begin a sentence. Exclamations like wow, good grief, and gee whiz, if not followed by an exclamation point, must also be set off by commas.

EXAMPLES No, I haven’t taken the exam yet.

Why, I thought you left yesterday!

Wow, look at those wheels!

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AP Bellwork10/11/11

Rule 5: Use comma after certain introductory elements.

  • Use a comma after an introductory participial phrase.

EXAMPLES Calling for a timeout, the referee began waving her arms.

Exhausted after three hours of continuous swimming, Diana emerged from the water.

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AP Bellwork10/11/11

Rule 5: Use comma after certain introductory elements.

(3) Use a comma after a succession of introductory participial phrases.

EXAMPLES By the light of the silvery moon in autumn, we went on an old-fashioned hayride.

[Three prepositional phrases precede the comma.]

NOTE: A single introductory prepositional phrase does not usually require a comma unless the comma is necessary to make the meaning of the sentence clear.

EXAMPLES By noon we had hiked four miles.

In our bank, checks are sorted automatically.

[The comma is needed so that the reader does not read “our bank checks.”]

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AP Bellwork10/12/11
  • Pickup handout from bookcase and complete. Fold your paper in half when finished and wait QUIETYLY at your seat (that still means you Dustin) for instructions.

Commas Exercise 4

Be ready for a quiz over all the comma rules so far next Monday!!!