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12 260 099 learners (2010) Very high access... ...until senior high school (substantial drop-out from grade 11 to 12). Three questions How does the quality of our education compare to other countries? Is the quality of SA education equal for all learners?

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12 260 099 learners (2010)

Very high access...

...until senior high school

(substantial drop-out from grade 11 to 12)


Three questions

How does the quality of our education compare to other countries?

Is the quality of SA education equal

for all learners?

What are the effects of socio-economic status and resources?


How does the quality of our education compare to other countries?

Last of 46 countries in maths & science test

Last of 40 countries in reading test


Below the average countries?

of neighbouring countries


despite countries?

“better access to resources,

more qualified teachers

and lower pupil-to-teacher ratios”


and we do worse countries?

except in the richest areas


Is the quality of SA education equal countries?

for all learners?

Absolutely not.

It is a lot more unequal

than in all neighbouring countries.




This inequality is countries?extreme. In 2004,

the top 7% of schools produced 66% of the matric HG maths passes.The bottom 79% of schools produced 15% of the passes.


Only 34 of the high-performing schools were former (apartheid) “black African” schools.

But 4277 of the low-performing schools were former “black African” schools.


We all have the same right to basic education. (apartheid) “black African” schools.Legally, we have one education system.Effectively, though, we have two education systems in our country...


What is the effect of socio-economic status (SES)? (apartheid) “black African” schools.

Overall, socio-economic status (class)

has the same effect is has overseas.

Better-off learners who go to schools with richer peers, do better.


But, in SA, (apartheid) “black African” schools.excluding quintile five schools,

differences in SES aren’t strongly tied to

differences in learner achievement.

It seems a lot of schools in our country

lack the basic level of systems

to efficiently turn inputs into learning.


Evidence indicates that (apartheid) “black African” schools.“[financial and human] resources matter,

conditionally”

Every school must have adequate financial resources.But most of our schools should do more with the resources they have.


We must and we can help our schools (apartheid) “black African” schools.

to do better.We should connect our schools to our communities – to ourselves and our organisations. These are also resources!

Organised hard work over time can build the support and accountability systems we need in our schools.

Then the equitable financial and human resources we deserve will matter more.


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