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Healthy Schools Leadership Project
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  1. Healthy Schools Leadership Project K-20 November 16, 2005

  2. WA Coordinated School Health Grant Staff • Martin Mueller, OSPI • Pam Tollefsen, OSPI • Lori Stern, WA DOH

  3. Kids bring their whole lives to school with them… and they don’t fit in a locker.

  4. Every student faces life challenges that impact his or her ability to learn. • Supporting kids and addressing health issues such as hunger, stress, harassment, substance use and unintended pregnancy can greatly improve their ability to learn.

  5. Healthy Schools Leadership Project Our Agenda Introduction to the coordinated school health framework Identify the potential impact of CSHP on student education and health outcomes Overview the Healthy Schools Leadership Project Questions and Answers

  6. An Uncoordinated System Pregnancy Prevention After-school Programs Special Education Clinic HIV/STD Prevention Health Services Physical Education Psychological Testing Immunizations Health Education Drug Prevention Juvenile Court Pupil Services School Food Services Crime Prevention Nutrition Education School Safety SCHOOL Drug Services Mental Health Services Environmental Health Counseling Social Services Community Organizations Smoking Cessation Staff Wellness Child Protective Services

  7. What is Coordinated School Health?

  8. WA Coordinated School Health Through the Healthy Schools Leadership Project, and other efforts… Support school based policy development, program implementation and strategies that support positive health outcomes and academic success.

  9. How Coordinated School Health Benefits Students Coordinated school health has been in place at many schools across the country with great results, such as: • Improved student performance and test scores • Decreased risky behaviors • Reduced drop out rates • Less absenteeism • Less fighting • Improved rates of physical activity

  10. Who drops out of school?Dropout rates for 2003-05 differed by race and genderSource:OSPI, 9/18/05

  11. Academic risk was significantly higher for Native American, Black, and Latino youth, significantly lower for Asian youth, in Comparison to non-Hispanic white youth Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  12. Students who did not feel safe in school had increased odds • for academic risk. Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  13. Overweight students had increased odds for academic risk Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  14. Students with diabetes had increased odds for academic risk Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  15. Students who smoked any cigarettes during the past month • had increased odds for academic risk Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  16. Students who drank 2+ sodas per day had increased odds • for academic risk Source: 2004 Healthy Youth Survey, state sample only. Graph uses unadjusted estimates; odds ratios are for estimates adjusted for grade (8-10-12) and maternal education (3-level).

  17. Significant Findings: Links between Health & Academic Achievement • Soda pop • Odds for academic risk were 69% higher for students who drank 2+ pops in a day. • Exercise • Odds for academic risk were 34% • Nutrition • 25% greater risk based on fruits and vegetables consumption • School Safety • Odds for academic risk were 44% greater among students who did not feel safe in school. • Maternal Education/SES • Overweight • Odds for academic risk remained 86% greater for overweight youth, in comparison to not overweight • Cigarette Smoking • Odds for academic risk were nearly three times (300%) greater for students who smoked.

  18. How Coordinated School Health Benefits Schools Coordinated school health not only benefits students, but helps schools to: • Save money • Reduce duplication • Reduce absenteeism • Improve staff morale • Support teacher teamwork

  19. The Application Complete a needs assessment or a statement of need • Child & adolescent risk behaviors • Education indicators (attendance, drop-out rates) • Current assessment of school health programs & practices • Student demographic information

  20. The Application After a statement of need, identify who in your district, buildings, and community can support the project • Youth, family, community • Health focused non profits • Faith-based organizations • Businesses • Higher education & many more.. • District personnel • School administrator • Health & PE teachers • School board member • Public health department

  21. The Project Selected teams will engage in a process that involves the fullschool community to identify one or two priority health areas basedon the local student health &well-being profile and other data collected

  22. The Project:Implement aCSH Action Plan Selected teams will developand implement a plan forbuilding a support system foraddressing each of the priorityareas through the CSH model and establish a realistic timeline for action plan implementation.

  23. Schoolwide Infusion of Priority Areas This step includes skill building and technical assistance for teams to engage the full school community to identify and integrate the identified health priorities for systems change. The Healthy Schools Leadership Project teams will do this over 3 years.

  24. Olympic High School • Participating team in the Healthy Schools Leadership Project 2000-2005 • Ted Vaughn, Team Leader

  25. Questions and Answers • Applications Due • December 16, 2005 • Applicants notified • January 6, 2006 • First meeting of the Healthy Schools Leadership Project • February 10-11, 2006 at Cedarbrook Center