Checking the ABC’S – Systematic Error Analysis in Student Assessments - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Checking the ABC’S – Systematic Error Analysis in Student Assessments

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  1. Checking the ABC’S – Systematic Error Analysis in Student Assessments Scott Clark Molly Barrett CAIS 2007

  2. Agenda • History • How we use this system • Helpful hints for implementation • Justification • Practice • What are others doing with this type of work?

  3. History…Evolution of Error Coding • Nov. 2005 article by Grant Wiggins and Stan Izen in Independent Teacher magazine on testing and assessment: • “…we need to make sure that students get feedback that they can use and profit from, [and] opportunities to use that feedback…” • Four main categories: ABC’S

  4. The Grid!

  5. A - Assessment Day Issue • Running out of time on test • Misreading the directions or problem • Making careless “OOPS!” errors • Blanking out on a problem • Not showing work! Not communicating ideas clearly • Leaving problems blank by mistake

  6. B = Background Topics/Skills Issue • Forget math from previous years • Forget math from previous chapters • Weak in algebra skills

  7. C = Current Topic/SkillsIssue • Missing basic facts - losing points on true/false, matching, or fill-in-blank • Missing routine problems - losing points on problems that were just like homework and classwork only with different numbers • Missing calculator skills - losing points for not knowing how to use the calculator (usually applies to graphing calculator skills)

  8. S = Synthesis You are losing points on problems that present new challenges or situations. You are struggling to bring to bear your knowledge and talent on a problem that is slightly or even significantly different from those you saw in class.

  9. How We Use This System • Purpose explained to students in Sept. • When grading test, teacher writes letter of type of mistake next to problem, and might circle where the mistake was made. • Using coded test, the student completes test corrections. Part of the correction process - identify the specific type of error (e.g. A2). • When test corrections are turned in, 2 minutes are spent filling in the error coding grid. Teacher keeps grids until the next quiz/test.

  10. Test Correction Guidelines • Complete all corrections on separate paper. • Mark error coding on each corrected problem (ex. A2, B1, etc..) • Correct each problem that had a mistake. Show all work. • Except for word problems, recopy all problems that are to be revised. • For word problems, recopy the question and the essential information (you do not need to copy the entire problem). • Revise the solutions so that they are correct. • Place a circle around revised answers. • At the end of each problem, describe in clear, written detail why the mistake occurred, and what has been learned in the revision process.

  11. Sample Test Corrections:

  12. Sample Test Corrections: This problem, I made a C2 mistake. I made a mistake on the original test because, instead of subtracting first, I divided. In the future, I will remember to use SADMEP on my problems.

  13. Implementation Hints • Copy grid and key on colored paper to make them easier to find later. • Teacher should keep the grids so a consistent record can be kept. • 3-4 times a year (or before midterm/final) have students make observations about any patterns in their errors. • Refer students back to the advice part of the key – how to improve!

  14. Justification

  15. FOUR LEVELS OF OUTCOMES: HABITS OF MIND THINKING SKILLS PROCESSES CONTENT ACTIVITIES http://www.habits-of-mind.net/ppt/1BuildaThoughtfulLrnCommHOM.ppt. Costa & Kallick (2000). Discovering and Exploring Habits of Mind, Alexandria, VA: ASCD, p55.

  16. Habits of Mind • Thinking & communicating with clarity and precision • Gathering data through all senses • Creating, imagining & innovating • Responding with wonderment & awe • Persisting • Managing impulsivity • Listening with understanding and empathy • Thinking flexibly • Thinking about thinking (metacognition) • Striving for accuracy • Questioning & posing problems • Applying past knowledge to new situations • Taking responsible risks • Finding humor • Thinking interdependently • Remaining open to continuous change

  17. Habits of Mind • Thinking & communicating with clarity and precision • Gathering data through all senses • Creating, imagining & innovating • Responding with wonderment & awe • Persisting • Managing impulsivity • Listening with understanding and empathy • Thinking flexibly • Thinking about thinking (metacognition) • Striving for accuracy • Questioning & posing problems • Applying past knowledge to new situations • Taking responsible risks • Finding humor • Thinking interdependently • Remaining open to continuous change

  18. Metacognition • Thinking about thinking • Is this an A error or a C error? Students make the final call (but often need teacher oversight) • What kind of A error is this? • Are there patterns that I observe in the kinds of errors that I am making? • What can I do differently to improve my performance?

  19. Student Perspectives • Error coding helps me to see what I have done wrong on previous tests. This helps because I make a checklist in my mind of what I need to do, to make sure that I don’t make them again. - Kyle • Error Coding: very useful because it tells me what mistakes I make most often. I had no idea that I made so many careless mistakes. Now I check my work more accurately. - Amara

  20. Student Perspectives • Error coding helps me realize what kinds of mistakes I make on test, and how I should fix them, instead of just getting points off with no explanation of why. - Victoria • Error coding gives students a chance to see their accumulated mistakes without having to keep track of each test. - Kate

  21. The Head-Royce Experiment in Grading Consistency(our own practice of metacognition)

  22. Practice “Fake error coding” today: • Look at the problem and the sample response • Using the error coding key, write the letter of the type of mistake you think the student made • Talking is encouraged!

  23. What are other schools doing with this type of work? • Habits of Mind in Curriculum Maps (JRPO schools) • Common scoring key (ex. HRS Algebra midterm) • Checklists for self-monitoring (across curriculum, work habits) - check w/school learning specialists • Apply similar system to homework • Model hwk answers - what you want it to look like • Oops errors - taking off 0 points • Don’t tell students whether or not answer is correct - student must convince class of solution. • Color coding grading - (green - correct; blue - can corrected for full credit; red - can be corrected for half credit) • Bring note card to next test based on previous error coding. • Include test-anxiety related section on grid

  24. Evaluation • Please give us feedback! • Feel free to contact us: • Scott Clark: sclark@headroyce.org • Molly Barrett: mbarrett@headroyce.org