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Chapter 5 Light: The Cosmic Messenger

Chapter 5 Light: The Cosmic Messenger

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Chapter 5 Light: The Cosmic Messenger

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  1. Chapter 5Light: The Cosmic Messenger

  2. 5.1 Basic Properties of Light and Matter Our goals for learning: • What is light? • What is matter? • How do light and matter interact?

  3. What is light?

  4. Light is an electromagnetic wave.

  5. Anatomy of a Wave

  6. Wavelength and Frequency wavelength  frequency = speed of light = constant

  7. The Electromagnetic Spectrum Electromagnetic Spectrum

  8. Particles of Light • Particles of light are called photons. • Each photon has a wavelength and a frequency. • The energy of a photon depends on its frequency.

  9. Wavelength, Frequency, and Energy l f = c l = wavelength, f = frequency c = 3.00  108 m/s = speed of light E = h f = photon energy h = 6.626  10-34 joule  s = photon energy

  10. What is matter?

  11. Atomic Terminology • Atomic Number = # of protons in nucleus • Atomic Mass Number = # of protons + neutrons

  12. Atomic Terminology • Isotope: same # of protons but different # of neutrons (4He, 3He) • Molecules: consist of two or more atoms (H2O, CO2)

  13. How do light and matter interact? • Emission • Absorption • Transmission • Transparent objects transmit light. • Opaque objects block (absorb) light. • Reflection or scattering

  14. Mirror reflects light in a particular direction. Movie screen scatters light in all directions. Reflection and Scattering

  15. Interactions of Light with Matter Interactions between light and matter determine the appearance of everything around us.

  16. What have we learned? • What is light? • Light is a form of energy. • Light comes in many colors that combine to form white light. • Light is an electromagnetic wave that also comes in individual “pieces” called photons. Each photon has a precise wavelength, frequency, and energy. • Forms of light are radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X rays, and gamma rays. • What is matter? • Ordinary matter is made of atoms, which are made of protons, neutrons, and electrons.

  17. What have we learned? • How do light and matter interact? • Matter can emit light, absorb light, transmit light, and reflect (or scatter) light. • Interactions between light and matter determine the appearance of everything we see.

  18. 5.2 Learning from Light Our goals for learning: • What are the three basic types of spectra? • How does light tell us what things are made of? • How does light tell us the temperatures of planets and stars? • How does light tell us the speed of a distant object?

  19. Continuous Spectrum Emission Line Spectrum Absorption Line Spectrum What are the three basic types of spectra? Spectra of astrophysical objects are usually combinations of these three basic types.

  20. Introduction to Spectroscopy

  21. Three Types of Spectra Illustrating Kirchhof's Laws

  22. Continuous Spectrum • The spectrum of a common (incandescent) light bulb spans all visible wavelengths, without interruption.

  23. Emission Line Spectrum • A thin or low-density cloud of gas emits light only at specific wavelengths that depend on its composition and temperature, producing a spectrum with bright emission lines.

  24. Absorption Line Spectrum • A cloud of gas between us and a light bulb can absorb light of specific wavelengths, leaving dark absorption lines in the spectrum.

  25. How does light tell us what things are made of? Spectrum of the Sun

  26. Chemical Fingerprints • Each type of atom has a unique set of energy levels. • Each transition corresponds to a unique photon energy, frequency, and wavelength. Energy levels of hydrogen

  27. Chemical Fingerprints • Downward transitions produce a unique pattern of emission lines.

  28. Production of Emission Lines

  29. Chemical Fingerprints • Because those atoms can absorb photons with those same energies, upward transitions produce a pattern of absorption lines at the same wavelengths.

  30. Production of Absorption Lines

  31. Production of Emission Lines

  32. Chemical Fingerprints • Each type of atom has a unique spectral fingerprint.

  33. Composition of a Mystery Gas

  34. Chemical Fingerprints • Observing the fingerprints in a spectrum tells us which kinds of atoms are present.

  35. Example: Solar Spectrum

  36. How does light tell us the temperatures of planets and stars?

  37. Thermal Radiation • Nearly all large or dense objects emit thermal radiation, including stars, planets, and you. • An object’s thermal radiation spectrum depends on only one property: its temperature.

  38. Properties of Thermal Radiation Hotter objects emit more light at all frequencies per unit area. Hotter objects emit photons with a higher average energy.

  39. Wien’s Law Wien’s Law

  40. Interpreting an Actual Spectrum • By carefully studying the features in a spectrum, we can learn a great deal about the object that created it.

  41. What is this object? Reflected sunlight: Continuous spectrum of visible light is like the Sun’s except that some of the blue light has been absorbed—the object must look red.

  42. What is this object? Thermal radiation: Infrared spectrum peaks at a wavelength corresponding to a temperature of 225 K.

  43. What is this object? Carbon dioxide: Absorption lines are the fingerprint of CO2 in the atmosphere.

  44. What is this object? Ultraviolet emission lines: Indicate a hot upper atmosphere

  45. What is this object? Mars!

  46. How does light tell us the speed of a distant object? The Doppler Effect

  47. The Doppler Effect Hearing the Doppler Effect as a Car Passes

  48. Explaining the Doppler Effect Understanding the Cause of the Doppler Effect

  49. Same for light The Doppler Effect for Visible Light