what is poetry n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
WHAT IS POETRY? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
WHAT IS POETRY?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 17

WHAT IS POETRY? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on

WHAT IS POETRY?. Why do we need poetry ?. Language is to communicate information Language is an instrument of persuasion Says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language Brings us a sense of life Brings us a perception of life Widens and sharpens our contact with existence

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'WHAT IS POETRY?' - nevin


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
why do we need poetry
Why do weneedpoetry?
  • Language is to communicate information
  • Language is an instrument of persuasion
  • Says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language
  • Brings us a sense of life
  • Brings us a perception of life
  • Widens and sharpens our contact with existence
  • Concerns with experience
special qualities of poetry
SpecialQualities of Poetry
  • STRUCTURAL DEVICES
  • Illustration

a vivid picture by which a poet may

make an idea clear

  • Repetition

aiming at special musical effects

a poet wants us to pay attention to something

  • Contrast

two completely opposite pictures side by side

the eagle alfred lord tennyson
THE EAGLEAlfred, Lord Tennyson

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;

Close to the sun in lonely lands,

Ringed with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;

He watches from his mountain walls,

And like a thunderbolt he falls.

repetition example
Repetition (Example)

Water, water everywhere,

And all the boards did shrink;

Water, water everywhere,

Nor any drop to drink.

Day after day, day after day,

We stuck, nor breath nor motion.

Thee for my recitative,

Thee in the driving storm …

Thee in thy panoply, …

. . .

Thy black cylindric body …

Thy . . . .

The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner

(Coleridge)

To a Locomotive in Winter

(Whitman)

special qualities of poetry1
SpecialQualities of Poetry

2. SOUND DEVICES

  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Assonance
  • Rhyme
  • Rhythm
sound devices
Sound Devices

Allitération: the repetition of the same sound at frequent intervals

The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew

The furrow followed free

Day after day, day after day

Dirty British coaster with a salt-caked smoke-stack

. . . boundless and bare

The lone and level sands stretch far away

sound devices1
Sound Devices
  • Onomatopoeia: occurs in words which imitate sounds and thus suggest the object described

cuckoo buzz crash tick-tack

hum swish jangle z .. z .. z ..

onomatopoeia example
Onomatopoeia (example)

Siesta of a Hungarian Snake(Edwin Morgan)

S szsz SZ sz SZ szZszsZszszs z

sound devices2
Sound Devices
  • Assonance: occurs when a poet introduces imperfect rhymes

wreck – rock grind – ground hole – road

speak – break life – mile hole – bowl

sound devices3
Sound Devices
  • Rhyme: occurs at line endings in poetry and consists of words which have the same sound.

be – sea come – dumb first – burst

night – sight fail – hail blew - flew

  • Rhythm:

- any wavelike recurrence of motion or sound

- related to: the beat of our heart

the pulse of our blood

the intake and outflow of air from lungs

rhythm
Rhythm

Metre: the basic pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables

  • Trochaic: alternating stressed and unstressed syllables, beginning with a stressed syllable

/ / / /

Minnehaha, Laughing Water. . . .

metre
Metre
  • Dactylic: alternating one stressed and two unstressed syllables, beginning with a stressed syllable

/ /

Take her up tenderly,

/ /

Lift her with care. . . .

metre1
Metre
  • Iambic: alternating stressed an unstressed syllables, beginning with an unstressed syllable

/ / / / /

That time of year thou may’st in me behold…

metre2
Metre
  • Anapaestic: alternating one stressed and two unstressed syllables, beginning with two unstressed syllables

/ / / /

The Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold…

slide16
Feet

Feet: type of the line

  • The safest way to divide a line into feet is by counting the stressed syllables
  • Longer lines have more feet, shorter ones have less
slide17
Feet

The customary names for line lengths are:

monometer one foot

dimeter two feet

trimeter three feet

tetrameter four feet

pentameter five feet

hexameter six feet

heptameter seven feet

octameter eight feet