Private sector telework and its implications for economic development results of a case survey
Download
1 / 21

Private Sector Telework and Its Implications for Economic Development: Results of a Case Survey - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 148 Views
  • Uploaded on

Private Sector Telework and Its Implications for Economic Development: Results of a Case Survey. Nathan W. Moon Enterprise Innovation Institute and School of Public Policy Science, Technology & Innovation Policy (STIP) Program Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Private Sector Telework and Its Implications for Economic Development: Results of a Case Survey' - neona


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Private sector telework and its implications for economic development results of a case survey l.jpg

Private Sector Telework and Its Implications for Economic Development: Results of a Case Survey

Nathan W. Moon

Enterprise Innovation Institute and

School of Public Policy

Science, Technology & Innovation Policy (STIP) Program

Georgia Institute of Technology

Atlanta, Georgia

September 11, 2007


Summary l.jpg
Summary Development: Results of a Case Survey

  • Private sector telework programs address issues relevant to economic development:

    • Recruiting and retaining talent (human capital)

    • Increasing employer productivity and profitability

    • Reducing employer operating expenses and real estate costs

    • Implementation of organizational changes

  • Top benefits: Productivity, improvements in employee work-life balance and job satisfaction, employer savings

  • Challenges for telework: Technological, organizational, and social issues

  • Few indications of any interface between telework programs and public policy


Purpose l.jpg
Purpose Development: Results of a Case Survey

  • Understand telework programs beyond the public sector and their stated focus on air pollution and traffic mitigation

  • Assess telework characteristics relevant to economic development:

    • Implementation rationales and challenges

    • Costs and savings

    • Telework benefits

    • Policy aspects

  • Determine what, if any, policy interface exists for private sector telework initiatives


Methodology l.jpg
Methodology Development: Results of a Case Survey

  • Case survey method

    • 60 cases selected for inclusion

    • Five categories of variables developed:

      • Program characteristics

      • Implementation factors

      • Operation factors

      • Outcomes

      • Policy interface

    • Case studies coded into data for analysis

    • Data analyzed

  • Baseline policy assessment: Determine extent of telework legislation in relevant states


Program locations l.jpg
Program Locations Development: Results of a Case Survey

  • 52 case studies from municipal clean air and transportation initiatives

  • and 8 cases from the business literature


  • Characteristics l.jpg
    Characteristics Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Nature of teleworking done in company (N=59)

    • 40% - Part-time teleworking

    • 22% - Full-time teleworking

    • 37% - Both part-time and full-time teleworking

      Purpose of telework (N=60)

    • 65% - Telecommuting for already employed workers

    • 35% - Shift jobs from centralized office to offsite locations

      Telework centers (N=60)

    • Availability of telework centers evident in 10% of cases

    • Among participating six employers, 50% require their use

      Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Implementation l.jpg
    Implementation Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Top five reasons for program implementation (N=60)

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Challenges l.jpg
    Challenges Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Top five challenges to implementation (N=60)

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Operation l.jpg
    Operation Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Components of telework program (N=60)

    • 85% - Formal telework policies

    • 83% - Feedback mechanisms (surveys, evaluations, focus groups)

    • 33% - Teleworker training programs

    • 15% - Manager training programs

      Employer subsidies (N=60)

    • 75% of employers: Telecommunications/computer costs

    • 25% of employers: Home office furniture/equipment

      Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Costs and savings l.jpg
    Costs and Savings Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Employer savings greater than costs in all but 2 cases (N=9)

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Outcomes l.jpg
    Outcomes Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Productivity

    • 97% of teleworkers: Increase in productivity (N=34)

    • 88% of managers: Increase in productivity (N=43)

    • 60% of teleworkers: Claim productivity increases of 20-40%

    • 64% of managers: Claim productivity increases of 0-20%

      Employee Impacts

    • 100% of teleworkers and managers: Better work-life balance for employees (N=39: teleworkers; N=27: managers)

    • 100% of teleworkers and managers: Improved job satisfaction or employee morale (N=42: teleworkers; N=44: managers)

      Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Outcomes12 l.jpg
    Outcomes Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Attitudinal Factors

    • 96% of employees: Support from managers (N=48)

    • 96% of teleworkers: Support from co-workers (N=24)

    • 83% of employees: Teleworking a positive initiative (N=60)

    • 95% of managers: Teleworking a positive initiative (N=60)

      Time and Traffic Impacts

    • 98% of employees: Time savings from teleworking (N=49)

    • All case studies reported a decrease in miles driven by teleworking employees (N=40)

      Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Success factors l.jpg
    Success Factors Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Factors identified as most important to program success (N=60)

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June-9 July, 2007


    Policy interface l.jpg
    Policy Interface Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Response to policy

    • 17% of case studies: Policymaking or legislation a major impetus in telework programs (N=60)

    • Legislative mandates: Clean Air Act (1990), Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), Family and Medical Leave Act (1993), various state clean air laws

      Funding and tax incentives

    • 18% of case studies: Funding from governmental or nonprofit sources for telework programs (N=60)

    • By contrast, none (0%) reported receiving any tax incentives (N=60)

      Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June-9 July, 2007


    State telework policy l.jpg
    State Telework Policy Development: Results of a Case Survey

    States with statutes that address the availability of telework

    Source: Sloan Work and Family Research Network (2005), and N. Moon, Survey of LexisNexis, 3-6 August, 2007


    Telework legislation l.jpg

    Employer tax credits Development: Results of a Case Survey

    for telework programs

    Arizona

    California

    Georgia

    Washington

    Employee tax credits for

    telework participation

    Arizona

    California

    Washington

    Telework Legislation

    Laws relating to

    air pollution/traffic reduction

    Arizona

    California

    Connecticut

    Illinois

    North Carolina

    New Jersey

    New York

    Texas

    Washington

    Source: Sloan Work and Family Research Network (2005), and N. Moon, Survey of LexisNexis, 3-6 August, 2007


    Telework in metro atlanta l.jpg
    Telework in Metro Atlanta Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Components of Operation

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June-9 July, 2007


    Telework in metro atlanta18 l.jpg
    Telework in Metro Atlanta Development: Results of a Case Survey

    Challenges to Implementation

    (tie) 1. Telecommunications problems

    1. Establishing management support

    (tie) 2. Non-specific computer problems

    2. Social issues

    2. Childcare related issues

    Success Factors

    (tie) 1. Individual implementation between manager and teleworker

    1. Technological considerations

    2. Telework training programs

    3. Involvement/support of upper management

    4. Employer telework policies

    Source: N. Moon, Analysis of 60 Case Studies, 25 June – 9 July, 2007


    Opportunities for georgia l.jpg
    Opportunities for Georgia Development: Results of a Case Survey

    • Telework’s potential: Bolstering human capital, increasing productivity, and decreasing costs

    • Management support: Major challenge for programs, but also important success factor

    • Georgia addressing private sector telework in policymaking: Outcomes of legislation not clear

    • Policymaking in other states: More may be done to promote private sector telework (e.g., employee-side benefits and public-private initiatives)


    Recommendations l.jpg
    Recommendations Development: Results of a Case Survey

    1. Educate managers about telework benefits and costs

    2. Develop employer peer networks: 1) address managerial challenges to telework acceptance, and 2) bolster management’s role as success factor

    3. Employer networks for other telework challenges: technology and social issues

    4. Encourage Georgia employers to take advantage of recent tax incentives through awareness campaigns

    5. Reframe thinking of policymakers and employers about telework as an economic development opportunity (i.e. cultivate new stakeholders to add to Clean Air Campaign’s involvement)


    Acknowledgements l.jpg
    Acknowledgements Development: Results of a Case Survey

    This project was supported through the Georgia Innovation Internship Program of the School of Public Policy and Enterprise Innovation Institute’s Science, Technology & Innovation Policy (STIP) Program.

    The speaker wishes to acknowledge Dr. Jan Youtie, Mr. Robert Lann, and Mr. Todd Greene for their guidance and advisement of this research project. Special thanks to Dr. Catherine Ross, Dr. Paul Baker, Mr. Matthew Hicks, Dr. Elisabeth Shields, Ms. Hazel Taylor, Mr. Taner Osman, and Mr. Steven Simms for their assistance with this project.


    ad