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Social Software, Teens, and Libraries. Cheryl Becker & Shawn Brommer South Central Library System. NEWIL, April 2007. Today’s Agenda. Definitions and examples Statistics/Millennials Benefits Safety Discussion and Demos (somewhere—a break). What is social software?.

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social software teens and libraries

Social Software, Teens, and Libraries

Cheryl Becker & Shawn Brommer

South Central Library System

NEWIL, April 2007

today s agenda
Today’s Agenda
  • Definitions and examples
  • Statistics/Millennials
  • Benefits
  • Safety
  • Discussion and Demos
  • (somewhere—a break)
what is social software
What is social software?
  • Social software enables people to rendezvous, connect or collaborate through computer-mediated communication and to form online communities.(from Wikipedia)
  • “Web 2.0”
some examples of social software
Some Examples of Social Software:
  • Blogs / RSS
  • Wikis
  • Instant Messaging (IM)
  • Media sharing
  • Social Networking Services
  • Social Bookmarking
  • Social Cataloging
  • Virtual worlds and multiplayer online games
slide5
Blog
  • Short for “web log.”
  • User-generated website with entries in journal format.
  • Owner posts commentary, allowing others to comment.
  • Creates online discussion forum.
  • RSS (Really Simple Syndication)
    • Allows users to subscribe to blogs.
a sampling of blogs
A Sampling of Blogs
  • Walking Paper
  • The Shifted Librarian
  • Tinfoil + Raccoon
  • librarian.net
  • TeenRead 07
slide7
Wiki
  • Collaborative resource creation
  • Allows users to add, edit, remove content
  • Examples
    • Wikipedia
    • Library Success
    • Citizendium
instant messaging
Instant Messaging
  • “IM”
  • Immediate, real-time chat (text)
  • Instantaneous
  • Point of need
  • AOL, MSN, Yahoo
media sharing
Media Sharing
  • Organize, store, tag, share
  • Groups
  • Examples:
    • Flickr (photos)
    • SmugMug (photos)
    • YouTube (videos)
social networking services
Social Networking Services
  • Places to meet and communicate
  • Shared interests or causes
  • Combines IM, blog, photo sharing, “Friending”
  • Examples:
    • MySpace
    • Facebook
    • Friendster
social bookmarking
Social Bookmarking
  • Putting bookmarks of your favorite websites in a web directory to share with others.
    • Or yourself!
  • Examples:
    • del.icio.us
    • Furl
    • Blue Dot
social cataloging
Social Cataloging
  • Allow users to tag items
  • Share catalogs with others
  • Interact with others based upon shared items
  • (How very “library like”!)
  • “MySpace for books”
  • Example: LibraryThing
virtual worlds
“Virtual Worlds”
  • Massively-Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs)
  • Online places to meet and interact with other people/avatars in a virtual world (which looks somewhat like reality).
  • Examples:
    • Second Life
    • Runescape
    • Club Penguin
teens internet use social networking
Teens, Internet Use & Social Networking
  • Teen brain development
  • Millennials
  • Information seeking habits of teens
  • Some statistics
  • Benefits
  • What does this mean for libraries?
teen brain development
Teen Brain Development
  • Hormones vs. Brains!
  • Social development
  • Risk taking
  • Emotional response
information seeking habits of teens
Information seeking habits of teens
  • Successful methods to address:
    • Cognitive approaches
    • Affective approaches
    • Socio-cultural approaches
    • Physical approaches

Valenza, Joyce Kasman, “They Might Be Gurus.” VOYA, April 2006.

millennials 1982 2000
Millennials (1982 – 2000)
  • Larger than the Baby Boom generation
  • 36% of the U.S. population.
  • 31% of this population are from diverse cultures

—Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation, Neil Howe & Bill Strauss

distinct qualities of millennials
Distinct qualities of Millennials
  • They are special
  • They are sheltered
  • They are confident
  • They are team-oriented
  • They are achieving
  • They are pressured
  • They are conventional

Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation, Neil Howe & Bill Strauss

millennials deal with them
Millennials: Deal With Them!
  • Digital Natives
  • Multi-taskers
  • Delay choices = Need info now
  • Social = Large network of friends
  • Games
  • Reading doesn’t necessarily mean books
  • Diverse learning styles

—Stephen Abram

teens technology
Teens & Technology
  • 87% of American teens use the Internet on a regular basis.
  • 1 out of 2 teens lives in a home with a broadband connection.
  • Their world is wired: 83% say most of the people they know use the internet

—Teens & Technology, PEW Internet & Life Project

how are they using the internet
How are they using the Internet?
  • 81% are playing games (over 17 million)
  • 76% are getting news (over 16 million)
  • 43% are making purchases (9 million)
  • 31% are seeking health information (6 million)
  • Use email, but prefer IM (75% of teens use IM)

—Teens & Technology (PEW Internet & Life Project)

where are they when they go online
Where are they when they go online?
  • 89% - home
  • 75% - school
  • 70% - a friend or relative’s house
  • 50% - the library
  • 9% - a community center or house of worship

—Web 2.0 and What it Means to Libraries (PEW Internet & Life Project)

social software for kids in libraries because
Social software for kids in libraries because. . .
  • They live their lives online
  • They get their information from the Internet
  • They socialize online
  • They expect it
additionally
Additionally. . .
  • They are future tax-payers and future library supporters.
  • This is the way teens seek, share and recommend information
  • We want libraries to remain relevant
  • . . . Not to mention, there are benefits of social software!
benefits of social software
Benefits of social software
  • Critical thinking
  • Reading and writing skills
    • 46% of teens read blogs
    • 39% of teens share their own creations (stories, poetry, artwork, photos, videos)
    • 28% of teens have created their own online journal or blog
  • Collaboration
    • 33% have worked together to create web pages (for school, clubs, friends or personal use)
benefits 2
Benefits (2)
  • Boundaries and expectations
  • Communicating with authors, experts, etc.—Social and cultural competence
  • Communication between those with special interests
benefits 3
Benefits (3)
  • Equalizing
    • Appearance, status, disabilities
  • Gaming: “Subversive Learning”
    • Learn skills
    • Form coalitions
    • Decision making
  • “Virtual malt shop”
benefits 4
Benefits (4)
  • See the YALSA articles (bibliography)
    • Social Networking and DOPA
    • Teens & Social Networking in School & Public Libraries
libraries are using social software to
Libraries are using social software to:
  • Support informational, educational, entertainment needs
  • Attract and serve new users
  • Be where our users are—online
  • Satisfy user expectations for online service
slide33
Library Examples

(“Library 2.0”)

blogs
Blogs
  • School: Mabryonline(Georgia)
    • Classroom: AP Calculus (Winnipeg)
  • Academic: UW Oshkosh
  • Public: Menasha Public Library
  • Special: St. Mary’s Health Sciences Library (Michigan)
wikis
Wikis
  • School: Pershing Middle (California)
    • Classroom: AP History (Pennsylvania)
  • Academic: Ohio University Libraries
  • Public: Stevens County Rural Library District (Washington)
instant messaging1
Instant Messaging
  • School: Fremont High School (California)
  • Academic: UW Madison
  • Public: Stoughton Public Library
  • Special: Massachusetts Trial Court Law Libraries
media sharing1
Media Sharing
  • School: SmugMug example
  • Academic: Little Priest Tribal College (Nebraska)
  • Public: Thomas Ford Memorial Library (Illinois)
  • Special: Brooklyn Museum of Art
myspace
MySpace
  • Public: Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County(North Carolina)
  • Academic: University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
  • Special: Brooklyn Museum(New York)
del icio us
Del.icio.us
  • Public: Lansing Public Library (Illinois)
  • Academic:
    • Maui Community College Library(Hawaii)
    • Norwich University(Vermont)
librarything
LibraryThing
  • Public: Franklin Township Public Library(New Jersey)
  • Academic: Southwestern Community College (Iowa)
gaming
Gaming
  • Public: Beloit Public Library
  • Academic: Mohawk College(Ontario)
is internet safety an issue
Is internet safety an issue?
  • It can be.
  • Not all information is accurate.
  • People online can be rude or exploitative.
    • (as in person!)
    • Anonymity can encourage bad behavior.
  • Potential for online scamming, identity theft, predation.
  • But, wait. . .
but wait
But wait. . .
  • Danger lurks in the “real world” too
  • Online networking isn’t going away
  • We don’t ban automobiles, or forbid children from walking alone
    • We teach them how to be safe
  • There are safety nets
safety nets
Safety Nets
  • Education and Involvement
  • Tips for youth
  • Tips for parents
  • Library internet policies
  • Helpful sources
problematic safety nets
Problematic Safety Nets
  • Filters
  • DOPA (Deleting Online Predators Act)
tips for youth
Tips for Youth
  • Keep personal information private.
  • Never get together with anyone you “meet” online.
  • Don’t respond to inappropriate messages.
  • Tell your parents if someone online:
    • Asks for your personal information
    • Wants to meet you in person
    • Sends inappropriate messages
  • Don’t share passwords.
  • Follow rules/expectations.
tips for parents
Tips for Parents
  • Talk to kids!
  • Learn what they’re using:
    • Have them show/teach you
    • Spend time with them online
    • Get your own account(s) and explore
  • Keep computer in visible area in home.
  • Monitor computer time.
  • Set and enforce rules for internet use.
sample internet policies schools
Sample Internet Policies (Schools)
  • Riverdale High School (OR)
  • Hattiesburg High School (MS)
  • Necedah Area Schools (WI)
  • Eau Claire Area School District (WI)
sample internet policies public libraries
Sample Internet Policies (Public Libraries)
  • Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg (NC).
  • Hennepin County (MN).
  • Portage Public Library (WI)
  • Thomas Ford Memorial Library (Western Springs, IL). (See Policy #4)
sample internet policies academic libraries
Sample Internet Policies(Academic Libraries)
  • Rutgers (NJ)
  • University of Oregon
  • Marquette(WI)
other sources of help
Other sources of help
  • My Space:
    • Safety Tips, and Tips for Parents
  • Wisconsin Department of Justice
  • American Library Association (ALA)
  • See bibliography for more
slide52
DOPA
  • Deleting Online Predators Act
  • Passed by House 410-15 / July 2006
  • Libraries that receive E-rate required to protect minors from “Commercial Social Networking Websites" and "Chat Rooms"
  • Died in Senate / December 2006
  • Reintroduced in House / February 2007
dopa jr
“DOPA Jr.”
  • Protecting Children in the 21st Century Act
  • Introduced in Senate / January 4, 2007
  • All the provisions of DOPA sandwiched between:
    • Restricting sale of children’s personal info
    • Higher fines for pornography violations
  • IL and GA / similar state laws proposed
shortcomings of dopa
Shortcomings of DOPA
  • Overly broad definitions of social networking and chat
  • Filtering sites based on technology, not content
  • Ignores educational uses & benefits of blogs, wikis, and other social software tools.
in conclusion
In Conclusion
  • Social Software is empowering & isn’t going away
  • Library 2.0:
    • Harness the benefits
    • Stay relevant to today’s users
  • Help users stay safe with education and involvement
contact
Contact:
  • Cheryl Becker
    • cbecker@scls.lib.wi.us
  • Shawn Brommer
    • sbrommer@scls.lib.wi.us