slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Briefing for NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel ________________ Briefing by Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Re PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Briefing for NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel ________________ Briefing by Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Re

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 36

Briefing for NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel ________________ Briefing by Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Re - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 196 Views
  • Uploaded on

Briefing for NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel ________________ Briefing by Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Ret.) Executive Officer, NOAA Marine Operations Center July 29, 2004. Purpose of This Briefing :

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Briefing for NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel ________________ Briefing by Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Re' - nani


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Briefing for NOAA’s

Hydrographic Services Review Panel

________________

Briefing by

Captain Stephen H. Manzo, NOAA (Ret.)

Executive Officer, NOAA Marine Operations Center

July 29, 2004

slide2

Purpose of This Briefing:

  • Present overview of Report of NOAA’s Ship Platform Requirements FY 2003 – FY 2012 to NOAA’s Hydrographic Services Review Panel
  • Internal NOAA report – Begun August 2002; Completed May 2003; Currently being updated
  • Copy of original report located at:
  • http://205.156.48.106/00003389/00021d31.pdf
slide3

Background:

  • Why? -- Response to DUS Scott Gudes’ Memo of July 30, 2002: Request for Report of NOAA’s Platform Requirements
  • What? -- 10-Year Analysis of NOAA’s Ship Platform Requirements and Recommendations on How Best to Fulfill the Requirements
  • Who? -- NMAO with input from and in coordination with the NOAA Line Offices
  • How? – Based on Ship Platform Requirements as identified by NOAA Line Offices
slide4

Background:

  • Report was fast-tracked – 3 month deadline for initial submission to VADM Lautenbacher
  • Copy provided to U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy
  • Report briefed to NOAA Science Advisory Board
  • Otherwise, it has been primarily used as an internal NOAA plan during the past 12- 18 months -- to help guide decisions regarding the NOAA fleet
  • Please note that all items recommended in this Report are not necessarily included in NOAA’s current programming or budget request
slide5

Six Mission Areas:

1) fisheries surveys and science

2) nautical charting/hydrographic surveys

3) blue water oceanography, climate and weather services

4) coastal oceanography

5) ocean exploration

6) homeland security

slide6

Assumptions:

1) NOAA’s Line Office reviews and documentation of ship platform requirements are valid

2) NOAA will meet its ship platform requirements using an appropriate mix of outsourcing and NOAA-owned and operated ships

3) Money will be tight and NOAA must be cost effective; conversion of surplus Navy vessels is a cost effective option for meeting NOAA’s ship platform requirements

slide7

Common Definition/Performance Metric:

  • Operating Day - “A day when a ship is not at its home port and is available for service”
  • Consistent with the way days are expressed in the academic fleet and private sector
slide8

Useful Service Life and Average Age:

  • Report assumes a “Useful Service Life” of 30 years for NOAA ships – consistent with the UNOLS academic research fleet plan
  • Based on 30 year useful service life, Report recommends NOAA set an “Average Age” goal of 15 years for the NOAA fleet – with ships ranging from 0 – 30 years
  • For a NOAA fleet of ~20 ships, this implies a long-term, replacement strategy of ~ one ship every 18 months.
slide9

Defining and Documenting Requirements:

  • Two Mission Areas – Fisheries Surveys and Science and Nautical Charting/Hydrographic Surveys – have well-documented, recent studies and reports on ship platform/data acquisition requirements that were reviewed and updated for this report
  • Two Mission Areas – “Blue Water” Oceanography and “Coastal” Monitoring and Assessment had requirements documented in FRAM Report, September 1990, that were reviewed and updated for this report
  • Two Mission Areas – Ocean Exploration and Homeland Security– reviewed and defined their requirements for this report
slide10

FY 2003 Ship Platform Requirements

  • 12,200* Operating Days – total requirement for all mission areas.
    • 4,680 Operating Days – 38% of requirement – to be met by Outsourcing.
    • 3,670 Operating Days – 30% of requirement – to be met by NOAA fleet of 15 ships.
    • 3,830 Operating Days – 32% of requirement – expected to be unmet for FY 2003.

* Does not include NOS contracts for Hydrographic Data

slide11

NOAA Ship Platform Utilization during the Past Decade

-- Significant Changes in NOAA’s Business Practice.

slide13

FY 2012 Ship Platform Requirements

  • 14,500 Operating Days – total requirement for all mission areas – 19% increase from FY 2003.
  • Recommended Approach/Solution:
    • 7,980 Operating Days – 55% of requirement – to be met by Outsourcing.
    • 5,350 Operating Days – 37% of requirement – to be met by NOAA fleet of 18 ships.
    • 1,140 Operating Days – 8% of requirement/ up to 6 ship-years remaining To Be Determined.
slide17

Nautical Charting/Hydrographic Survey Requirements:

  • Requirements for hydrographic data based on Office of Coast Survey’s National Survey Plan (November 2000) – updated w/ 2002 data
  • Requirements for maintaining federal expertise and for replacing NOAA’s hydrographic fleet based on 2000 Report to Congress – Maintaining Federal Expertise and Capability in Hydrographic Services
  • Cost-benefit analysis of in-house, contract, and time charter resources was prepared by KPMG Consulting for NOAA in September 2001
slide18

National Survey Plan:

  • Navigationally Significant -- 538,000 snm (approximately 16% of 3.4 million snm EEZ)
  • Critical Backlog -- 43,000 snm (approximately 8% highest priority portion of Navigationally Significant Area)
  • Resurvey Areas -- 5,000 snm (areas of Critical Backlog and Navigationally Significant that require periodic surveying due to silting, shoal migration, and new obstructions in shipping channels)
slide20

Current Status:

  • In FY 2004, NOAA’s hydrographic survey rate is approximately 2,800 snm per year (vice 9,500 snm requirement)
  • At this rate, the remaining 29,000 snm of Critical Backlog is not expected to be completed until the year 2016
  • At this rate, requirements for Resurvey Areas and Navigationally Significant Areas are not being met
slide21

To meet requirements, NOAA must:

  • Complete the remaining 29,000 snm of Critical Backlog
  • Begin surveying 1,000 snm per year in Resurvey Areas in order to maintain a 2-7 year cycle
  • Obtain 100% bottom coverage surveys in all Navigationally Significant Areas, and periodically resurvey them on a 50-60 year cycle
  • In order to fully address these core requirements NOAA needs to survey 9,500 snm per year (Note: This is more than 3 times the current rate)
slide24

Two Options for meeting NOAA’s Nautical Charting Requirements:

  • Both options phase in additional data acquisition resources gradually with the goal of meeting 9,500 snm by FY 2012 (Note: Option 1 is lowest cost option)
    • Option 1 -- 6 NOAA Hydrographic Survey ships by FY 2012 (THOMAS JEFFERSON, SWATH, FAIRWEATHER Replacement, RAINIER Replacement, New 2-Launch Atlantic/Gulf/Caribbean, and New 2-Launch Pacific/Alaska); 100% increase in Hydro Contracts; One Additional 2-Launch Time Charter; LIDAR Contracts
    • Option 2 – 5 NOAA Hydrographic Survey ships by FY 2012 (all except New 2-Launch Pacific/Alaska); 200% increase in Hydro Contracts; Two Additional 2-Launch Time Charters; LIDAR Contracts
slide27

The NOAA Fleet - Changes in FY 2003/2004:

  • 4 ships removed from service/replaced with newer ships converted for NOAA missions:
    • TOWNSEND CROMWELL/OSCAR ELTON SETTE
    • FERREL/NANCY FOSTER
    • MCARTHUR/MCARTHUR II
    • WHITING/THOMAS JEFFERSON (commissioned July 8, 2003 in Norfolk)
  • 3 ships added to NOAA fleet:
    • FAIRWEATHER (conversion) – Reactivation ceremony scheduled for August 18, 2004 in Ketchikan
    • HI’IALAKAI (conversion)
    • OSCAR DYSON (new construction)
slide28

The NOAA Fleet - Changes in FY 2003/2004:

  • NOAA active fleet expanded from 15 to 18 ships
  • USNS ASSERTIVE (T-AGOS 9) acquired from U.S. Navy as future replacement for DAVID STARR JORDAN
slide29

The NOAA Fleet – Expected Changes in FY 2005/2006:

  • Expect to acquire USNS CAPABLE (T-AGOS 16) from U.S. Navy as an additional ship for Ocean Exploration. Conversion likely to occur in FY 2005/2006. Begin operations TBD. When activated NOAA fleet would expand to 19 ships.
  • Ship Disposals:
    • MCARTHUR transfer to Utrok Atoll pending
    • FERREL transfer/disposal pending
    • WHITING transfer to Mexico – Legislation pending
slide30

The NOAA Fleet – Expected Changes in FY 2007/2008:

  • HENRY B. BIGELOW (FSV2) operational in FY 2007 -- overlaps/replaces ALBATROSS IV in FY 2008
  • FSV3 – Additional Fishery Survey Vessel for SE operational in FY 2007. Temporarily expands NOAA fleet to 20 ships – eventually replaces DELAWARE II when FSV6 comes on line to replace OREGON II
  • FSV4 – Additional Fishery Survey vessel shared by SW and NW operational in FY 2008. Expands NOAA fleet to 21 ships.
  • SWATH – operational in FY 2008 – replaces RUDE; homeported in New Hampshire
  • USNS ASSERTIVE (T-AGOS 9) converted FY 2007 to replace DAVID STARR JORDAN in FY 2008
slide31

Summary:

  • NOAA is working hard to modernize its aging fleet and to maintain federal expertise – in hydrographic services – and in other program areas, as well
  • The majority of NOAA fleet modernization in the recent past and immediate future has been in the area of fisheries surveys and science
slide32

Summary (con’t):

  • Ship Acquisition/Conversion -- NOAA has acquired/converted 6 T-AGOS ships from the U.S. Navy and is expected to soon acquire a 7th (CAPABLE – dedicated for Ocean Exploration).
    • 3 T-AGOS ships dedicated for fisheries programs (GUNTER, SETTE and ASSERTIVE/DSJ)
    • 2 T-AGOS ships serve multiple programs (MCARTHUR II and HI’IALAKAI)
    • 1 T-AGOS ship dedicated for TAO array (KA’IMIMOANA)
slide33

Summary (con’t):

  • Ship Acquisition/Conversion -- NOAA has also acquired/converted 1 YTT and 1 TAGS-51 from the U.S. Navy
    • YTT-12 -- NANCY FOSTER replaced FERREL dedicated for coastal oceanography programs on the east coast
    • TAGS-51 – THOMAS JEFFERSON replaced WHITING dedicated to nautical charting/hydrographic survey programs on the east coast
slide34

Summary (con’t):

  • New Construction
    • 4 new, purpose built Fishery Survey Vessels already in pipeline
    • 2 additional FSV’s currently in 10-year plan – different from first 4 (long-liner for Hawaii; shallow-draft for GOM)
    • 1 additional FSV (MILLER FREEMAN replacement) under consideration
    • SWATH vessel to replace RUDE for nautical charting/hydrographic surveys on east coast in pipeline
slide35

Summary (con’t):

  • Modernization/Reactivation
    • FAIRWEATHER modernization is now complete and the ship will be soon be reactivated and dedicated to nautical charting/hydrographic surveys in Alaska. Homeport is Ketchikan, Alaska. Given the significant investment involved, expect the ship to stay in service another 10-15 years vice being replaced in FY 2012.