What is it that drives and directs one’s actions? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

misha
what is it that drives and directs one s actions n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
What is it that drives and directs one’s actions? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
What is it that drives and directs one’s actions?

play fullscreen
1 / 9
Download Presentation
Presentation Description
68 Views
Download Presentation

What is it that drives and directs one’s actions?

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. What is it that drives and directs one’s actions? • The concept of motivation • Maslow’s hierarchy of motivation • The example of “hunger” • Homeostasis • Drive reduction

  2. Primarily biological Primarily learned Primarily involving the individual Primarily social e.g., hunger (Ch. 3) e.g. desire to acquire possessions (Ch. 14, 17) e.g. need for prestige (Ch. 14, 17) e.g. sex (Ch. 10)

  3. Maslow’s Hierarchy: (See Gleitman pp. 740-744) Self-actualization needs Esteem needs Belongingness and love needs Safety needs Physiological needs

  4. Self-actualization needs Esteem needs “Social” needs Safety needs Physiological needs Psychological development Maslow’s hierarchy over time

  5. Possible dependent variables Possible independent variables Intervening variable Food seeking behavior Hours of deprivation Volume of food eaten Sight and smell of food Tolerance for bitter taste Social facilitation Preoccupation with and sensitivity to food images Hunger


  6. Drive Instrumental behavior Consummatory behavior Drive reduction Homeostatic restoration Quiescence Need

  7. 1 2 Decreased glucose availability Decreased fatty-acid availability Inhibition 6 Multiple food-seeking responses 5 3 Liver Stomach Mouth Intestine 4 Hunger Satiety Eating

  8. Hypothalamus Hypothalamus

  9. Clark Hull’s list of regulatory drives: • Hunger • Thirst • Optimum temperature • Urination • Defecation • Burping • Rest (after protracted exertion) • Sleep (after protracted wakefulness) • Activity (after protracted inaction)