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TOP 5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT October 20, 2008 PowerPoint Presentation
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TOP 5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT October 20, 2008

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  1. TOP 5 THINGS YOU NEEDTO KNOW ABOUTEMERGENCY MANAGEMENTOctober 20, 2008 Brett Burdick, Deputy State Coordinator VDEM

  2. Disaster Response in Virginia

  3. Local Governments are: First line of defense against emergencies. Primarily responsible for managing the response to emergencies and disasters. Responsible for responding to the event in a way that will: Warn citizens, yet ensure public order and security. All Disasters are Local

  4. All Disasters are Local (Cont.) Contain the emergency to: Protect people and property. Minimize damage. Manage escalation beyond local capabilities. Provide immediateaid to citizens Restore essential vital services Assist individuals and families in need

  5. #1 SUPPORT YOUR COORDINATOR

  6. LOCAL ROLE -- ORGANIZATION -- DIRECTOR STATELOCALITIES GOVERNOR MAYOR/CITY MANAGER* MEMBER, BOARD OF SUPERVISORS/COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR* * CONSENT OF GOVERNING BODY

  7. LOCAL ROLE -- ORGANIZATION -- COORDINATOR STATELOCALITIES STATE LOCAL COORDINATOR COORDINATING APPOINTED BY OFFICER DIRECTOR* (APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR) * CONSENT OF GOVERNING BODY

  8. During Non-Emergency Times Your local EM office should lead a TEAM that: Develops and maintains an Emergency Operations Plan, to include: Establishing procedures for warning at risk population. Providing adequate expedient shelter capability for reasonably anticipated risks. Devising strategy for achieving interoperable tactical communications for first responders. Exercises this plan to identify and fix any shortcomings. Coordinates long-term recovery and mitigation efforts.

  9. #2 FORM A TEAM

  10. Required by Federal Law – Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) and Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 Members should include elected local officials, law enforcement, emergency management, fire service, EMS, local health, environmental, hospital, and transportation officials Additional members recommended are broadcast/print media and community group representatives as well as owners and operators of local chemical storage/manufacturing facilities

  11. Primary focus is hazardous materials however it is recommended that they operate in an all-hazards approach Required to develop a community hazardous materials emergency plan and review it annually Evaluate the need for resources necessary to develop, implement and exercise the emergency plan Establish procedures for receiving and processing requests from the public for information related to hazardous materials

  12. Development, training, and testing of the community’s hazardous materials emergency response plan Work with industry and the interested public to encourage continuous attention to chemical safety, risk reduction, and accident prevention by each local stakeholder Access to funding from the USDOT Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness (HMEP) grant

  13. #3 KNOW THE STATE ROLE

  14. Seven regional coordinators offer single source of communication between VDEM and localities. • Regional coordination of state assets. • First line of state assistance during an emergency.

  15. VDEM Organization

  16. Operations Virginia Emergency Operations Center (VEOC) 24/7/365 Primary State Warning Point Alerting Systems Emergency Alert System Emergency Management Network (EMnet) Statewide Alert System (SWAN) Information Dissemination Integrated Flood Observing and Warning System (IFLOWS)

  17. Operations (Cont.) Resource Coordination Search and Rescue (SAR) Coordination Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) Implementation Statewide Mutual Aid (SMA) Mobile Communications Fusion Center Virginia Emergency Response Team

  18. Virginia Emergency Response Team (VERT) Coordinate response to disasters and emergencies throughout Commonwealth Comprised of more than 300 members Over 20 state agencies Non-profit organizations Private partners Federal partners Organized under NIMS Operations, Planning, Logistics, Finance/Administration and Emergency Support Functions (ESF)

  19. #4 KNOW THE FEDERAL ROLE

  20. National Incident Management System

  21. National IncidentManagement System “…a consistent nationwide approach for federal, state, tribal, and local governments to work effectively and efficiently together to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity.” -HSPD-5

  22. National Response Framework The National Response Framework is built on the template of the National Incident Management System. It provides the structure and mechanisms for coordinating federal support to state, local and tribal incident managers … And for exercising direct federal authorities and responsibilities. Who's in Charge of What!

  23. What Is an Incident? • An incident is . . . . . . an occurrence, caused by either human or natural phenomena, that requires response actions to prevent or minimize loss of life, or damage to property and/or the environment.

  24. What Is ICS? The Incident Command System: Is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management concept. Allows its users to adopt an integrated organizational structure to match the complexities and demands of single or multiple incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries.

  25. ICS Purposes Using management best practices, ICS helps to ensure: The safety of responders and others. The achievement of tactical objectives. The efficient use of resources.

  26. ICS Benefits Meets the needs of incidents of any kind or size. Allows personnel from a variety of agencies to meld rapidly into a common management structure. Provides logistical and administrative support to operational staff. Is cost effective by avoiding duplication of efforts.

  27. #5 KNOW THE ASSISTANCE PROCESS

  28. Public Assistance (PA) Response and Recovery Operations and Public Infrastructure (75% Federal, 25% State-Local, Stress Index) Emergency Work Debris Removal Protective Measures Permanent Work Roads, Bridges, Water Control, Building, Utilities

  29. Individual Assistance (IA) Federal Declaration Housing Assistance (100%) Transient Accommodations Home Repair/Replacement Cash Grants Other Needs Assistance (75%) Medical /Dental expenses Funeral expenses

  30. Disaster Recovery Joint Field Office (JFO) to implement federal and state assistance programs. Near disaster site. State-Federal JFO Staff State Coordinating Officer – Michael Cline. Federal Coordinating Officer – designated. State staff deployed to JFO State Disaster Recovery Task Force Activation

  31. #6 SOME EXTRAS

  32. Call to Action Lead by Example: Learn and understand the disaster response process Enlist your Emergency Management Coordinator to help you all along the way Support your local Emergency Management Coordinator’s preparedness and mitigation efforts – not just response

  33. Check Plans, Policies, and Laws Do your preparedness plans, policies, and procedures: Comply with NIMS, including ICS? Cover all hazards? Include delegations of authority (as appropriate)? Include up-to-date information?

  34. Establish Resource Management Systems Do you have established systems for: Describing, inventorying, requesting, and tracking resources? Activating and dispatching resources? Managing volunteers? Demobilizing or recalling resources? Financial tracking, reimbursement, and reporting? Do you have mutual aid agreements for obtaining resources, facilities, services, and other required support from other jurisdictions during an incident?

  35. Establish Communications and Information Systems Do you have protocols and procedures for: Formulating and disseminating indications and warnings? Formulating, executing, and communicating operational decisions? Preparing for potential requirements and requests supporting incident management activities? Developing and maintaining situation awareness? Can responders from different agencies (e.g., fire, police, public works) or mutual aid partners communicate with one another? Do you have a plan/budget for maintaining and replacing your emergency communication systems?

  36. Training, Credentialing, and Exercising Do you have sufficient qualified personnel to assume ICS Command and General Staff positions? Can you verify that personnel meet established professional standards for: Training? Experience? Performance? When was the last table-top or functional exercise that practiced command and coordination functions? Did you participate in that exercise?

  37. PARTNERSHIP VACO VDEM VML