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PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS PowerPoint Presentation
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PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

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PATHWAYS TO SUCCESS

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  1. Aif '01

  2. PATHWAYSTO SUCCESS Aif '01

  3. Aifric Morrissey, MISCP Chartered Physiotherapist

  4. MAXIMISING CLUB PERFORMANCE INJURY PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT

  5. INJURY PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT • Injury Prevention • Simple Injury Management • Rehabilitation • Special Groups • Maximising the use of your Club Physiotherapist Aif '01

  6. INJURY PREVENTION • Principles of Injury Prevention • Pre-participation Assessment • Flexibility • Equipment Selection • Massage Aif '01

  7. Correct biomechanics Warm up Stretching Taping/bracing Suitable equipment Appropriate surfaces Appropriate training Adequate recovery Psychology Nutrition 1. Principles of Injury Prevention Aif '01

  8. 2. Pre-participation Assessment • Medical • Nutrition • Psychological • Physical Aif '01

  9. PAR NB: • Plan • Act • Review Aif '01

  10. Why Screen? • Identify weaknesses • Injury prevention • Baseline for review • Introduction to medical team/backup Aif '01

  11. Past history Equipment used Training schedule/content Posture Lower limb biomechanics Peripheral joint assessment Spinal assessment Flexibility Neurological Proprioception/Co-ordination Specific Tests Functional Assessment Physical Screen Aif '01

  12. 3. Flexibility Aif '01

  13. Principles of stretching • Warm up prior to stretching • Stretch before and after exercise • Stretch gently and slowly • Stretch to point of tension, NEVER PAIN Aif '01

  14. Benefits • Reduce muscle/tendon injuries • Minimise muscle soreness • Improves range of motion • Reduces tension • Earlier return to function Aif '01

  15. Methods of stretching • Static flexibility • Injury prevention • Dynamic flexibility • Athletic performance • PNF • Care not to overstretch Aif '01

  16. 4. Equipment Selection Aif '01

  17. Footwear Aif '01

  18. >300 miles shoes lose 50% of shock absorbency Studies show appropriate footwear can reduce shock by 2/3 Impact: Running sports – 2-5 times bodyweight Jumping sports – 4-7 times bodyweight Aif '01

  19. NB select shoes suited to sport, surface, foot type/biomechanics Prior to purchase, examine soles of shoes, inner lining, wear from behind Features: Rigid heel counter – added stability Flexible forefoot – easy motion Midsole – not too firm or soft – shock absorber Aif '01

  20. Sports Shoes • Running spikes • overuse of calf muscle, AT, Shin pain • Football boots • Rigid heel counter, adequate foot depth, wide sole, curved, flexible forefoot • Court based sport e.g. basketball • Good grip, ankle support, shock absorbency • Dancing shoes -? Aif '01

  21. Protective Equipment • Shield against injury without interfering with sport • Allow early return to sport, while adding protection • ? Psychological benefit NB. Fits correctly Aif '01

  22. 5. Massage • Pre-performance massage • ? Performance enhancement • Post event massage • ? Better to do good warm down • Positive psychological effect Aif '01

  23. Research – varied results Bruising should not occur Never in acute inflammatory stage Injury – refer for treatment Aif '01

  24. INJURY PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT • Methods of Injury Prevention • Simple Injury Management • Rehabilitation • Special Groups • Maximising the use of your Club Physiotherapist Aif '01

  25. SIMPLE INJURY MANAGEMENT • P.R.I.C.E. • Blister Care • The First Aid Kit • Taping and Bracing Aif '01

  26. 1. P.R.I.C.E • Protect • Rest • Ice • Compression • Elevation Aif '01

  27. Protect • Crutches, sling, taping, P.O.P. • Up to day 3 • Avoid complete immobilisation • Accommodate swelling Aif '01

  28. Rest • Immediately • 1-5 days • Isometric work • Reduce overall general activity Aif '01

  29. Ice • Immediate • Avoid ice burn • 20-30 minutes, every 2 hours • Complete area • Care with thin skin, nerve damage, certain conditions Aif '01

  30. Compression • Distal to proximal • Apply min. 15cm below injury site • Accommodate swelling - overlap by 2/3 spiral turns protect vulnerable areas • Continue for first 72 hours • Check Circulation Aif '01

  31. Elevation • First 72 Hours • Support area • If in elevation, reduce compression • Avoid dependent position immediately on removal Aif '01

  32. Avoid in first 24 hours! • Heat • Alcohol • Moderate/intense activity • Vigorous massage Aif '01

  33. 2. Blisters Aif '01

  34. Causes • Friction: • Stones/debris • Loose/ ill fitting shoes • Incorrect shoes • Biomechanical • New shoes • Fungal infections • Medical cauases Aif '01

  35. Dry feet well Moist skin- surgical spirit Natural fibre socks Seamless socks Check shoes for debris Inner soles smooth Break in new shoes Correct footwear Avoid man-made materials Protect areas prone to blisters Prevention Aif '01

  36. Treatment REMOVE CAUSE • Cover blister – Bandage, pad-protector • Do not burst • If bursts – clean in salty water and dress • Infection/pain – seek medical advice • Black toenails – leave or see chiropodist Aif '01

  37. 3. The First Aid Kit • Club bag • Touchline bag Aif '01

  38. Contents of Club Bag • Taping and Strapping • Cold therapy • First Aid goods • Miscellaneous goods • Over the counter medication Aif '01

  39. 4. Taping and Bracing Is Objective: • Practical? • Logical? Aif '01

  40. Taping Joints suited to taping: Ankle, wrist, AC joint, finger, thumb No proven benefit in injury prevention: Knee, shoulder, elbow, spinal Aif '01

  41. Guidelines for taping • Skilled • Assess prior to taping • Plan • Prepare the skin • Protect friction areas, pressure areas • Check positioning • Apply tape • Check the finished product Aif '01

  42. Bracing Considerations: • Initial cost • Easy application by athlete • Custom made braces – hand, wrist • Brace may be cumbersome Aif '01

  43. INJURY PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT • Methods of Injury Prevention • Simple Injury Management • Rehabilitation • Special Groups • Maximising the use of your Club Physiotherapist Aif '01

  44. REHABILITATION Aif '01

  45. Essential Components of Good Rehabilitation EARLY REFERRAL to appropriately trained sports physiotherapist and/or doctor! Aif '01

  46. Physiotherapist’s Role • Accurate diagnosis • Clear explanation • Precise, individual prescription • Make the most of facilities available • Knowledge of sport • Communication with coach/team etc. • Liaison with other professionals • Understanding of psychological impact Aif '01

  47. Rehabilitation NB. FUNCTIONAL AND SPORT SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES Aif '01

  48. Return to Sport • Soft tissue healed • Pain-free full range of movement • No persistent swelling • Adequate strength, endurance • Good flexibility Aif '01

  49. Good proprioception Adequate cardiovascular fitness Skills regained No persistent biomechanical abnormality Psychologically ready Coach satisfied with training Aif '01

  50. Adjuncts to Rehabilitation • Hydrotherapy • Muscle Balance • Gymnastic Ball Aif '01