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Speech-Language Pathology Policies and Procedures Manual. Produced by ALSDE Speech Pathology Task Force. ALSDE SPEECH PATHOLOGY TASK FORCE. Dr. Kathryn Byrd, Consultant Pam Ardis-Wimbish Dr. Linda Murdock Jane Boykin Leigh Sayers

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speech language pathology policies and procedures manual

Speech-Language PathologyPolicies and ProceduresManual

Produced by

ALSDE

Speech Pathology Task Force

alsde speech pathology task force
ALSDE SPEECH PATHOLOGY TASK FORCE

Dr. Kathryn Byrd, Consultant

  • Pam Ardis-Wimbish Dr. Linda Murdock
  • Jane Boykin Leigh Sayers
  • Susan Clay Kay Spivey
  • Jackie Walker Judy Cutcheon
  • Monyette Cunningham
  • Jan Enstrom, ALSDE Education Specialist
chapter i
CHAPTER I

DEFINITIONS

AND

CHARACTERISTICS OF

SPEECH OR LANGUAGE

IMPAIRMENTS

definitions
DEFINITIONS

PURPOSE

You know your essential definitions of the four kinds of communication disorders, but do you recall what they exclude?

The purpose of this section of the presentation is to emphasize what the definitions exclude.

definitions5
DEFINITIONS

Definitions for the four communication disorders can be found in the current editions of

  • Alabama Administrative Code and
  • Mastering the Maze.

By going to the Alabama State Department of Education website at www.alsde.edu., both of these publications and more information can be downloaded.

definitions6
DEFINITIONS

Articulation disorders do not include

  • phonological errors/phonological processes which are within developmental norms
  • errors which are stimulable
  • an abnormal swallowing pattern as the sole diagnosis
  • a dialectal pattern or second language acquisition pattern
definitions7
DEFINITIONS

Voice Disordersdo not consist of

  • temporary problems resulting from normal voice change due to the onset of adolescence
  • vocal differences related to allergies, asthma, colds, tonsils and/or adenoid removal
  • other non-treatable conditions or to temporary illness
  • selective mutism (AKA “elective mutism”)
definitions8
DEFINITIONS
  • Developmental dysfluencies that children normally exhibit as they mature are not considered a fluency disorder.
    • Often children will exhibit a period of dysfluent speech between 2-5 years of age (Shipley and McAfee,1992).
    • This occurrence does not automatically qualify them for speech services.
    • The speech-language pathologist must differentiate between normal dysfluencies and a fluency disorder.
definitions9
DEFINITIONS
  • To qualify as a language disorder, the following new criteria must be met.
  • Disregard the criteria from editions of the Alabama Administrative Code prior to 7-19-07.
  • Use the current Language Process Chart available at www.alsde.edu.
  • The student must achieve a total language standard score or quotient of at least two standard deviations below the mean (70 or below) on a standardized comprehensive language test containing both receptive and expressive components.
definitions10
DEFINITIONS

If the total languagestandard score does not meet the criteria of at least 2 SDs below the mean (70 or below),

  • a standard score at least 2 SDs below the mean (70 or below) in one area (receptive or expressive) of a comprehensive language testAND
  • a standard score or quotient at least 2 SDs below the mean (70 or below) on an assessment of a specific language component (in the same area) must be used.
definitions12
DEFINITIONS

Dialectal differences, such as one in which the regular past tense “-ed” ending is often omitted (example: “He talked yesterday” becoming “He talk yesterday”), is not considered a language disorder.

definitions13
DEFINITIONS

Students with limited English proficiency (LEP) do not automatically qualify for speech-language services.

Beware: Inappropriate assessment tools and procedures may lead to misidentification and inappropriate placement of the child in special education

(LEP will be discussed in more detail in Chapter IX) .

chapter ii
CHAPTER II

IDENTIFICATION

AND

REFERRAL

identification referral
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

IDENTIFICATION RELATES TO

  • Students under 3 years of age
    • Early Intervention (EI) students
    • Non EI students
  • Students ages 3 through 21 years old
  • Screening
identification referral16
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

TRANSITION FROM EI TO PRE-K:

  • Age of referral
  • Transition meeting
  • Documentation form
  • Referral meeting
  • Referral Form
  • LEA of residence
  • Summer birthdays
  • Timelines
identification referral17
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

NON-TRANSITIONING PRE-K STUDENTS:

  • Responsible agency
  • Referral meeting
  • Referral form
identification referral18
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

STUDENTS 3-21 YEARS

  • If suspected of speech impairment only (artic, voice, or fluency), may proceed directly to referral without BBSST
  • Kindergarten through 12th grade student must go through BBSST if student has suspected
    • Language impairment only
    • Combined speech and language impairment
    • Any concomitant instructional or behavioral concerns
identification referral19
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

If a student is suspected of having both speech and language and/or other impairments, the IEP team may decide to

  • Proceed with speech referral/testing while BBSST provides prereferral language intervention, OR
  • Wait until BBSST intervention is completed then proceed with referral/testing of speech and language at the same time.

BUT the IEP Team must remember timelines.

identification referral20
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL

KINDS OF SCREENING

  • Screening for instructional purposes in Reg. Ed class by Reg. Ed teacher is not SPE function.
  • Speech or language screening is not permitted for individual students.
  • Vision and hearing screening must be completed on all referred students prior to testing.
identification referral21
IDENTIFICATION & REFERRAL
  • REFERRAL PROCEDURES ARE OUTLINED ON PROCESS CHART 1
  • REMEMBER TIMELINES
    • Eligibility must be determined within 60 calendar days after parent signs consent to evaluate
    • IEP must be developed within 30 days after eligibility determination.
chapter iii
CHAPTER III

INITIAL

SPEECH

OR

LANGUAGE

EVALUATION

initial evaluation
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • When conducting a speech or language evaluation, be sure to follow all procedures outlined in the SLI section of the AAC (p. 519ff.)
  • Use the Compliance Verification Form (Speech or Language Impairment Section) as your checklist for required data collection.
initial evaluation24
INITIAL EVALUATION

Check here to document giving assessments.

Check here to document reporting on eligibility form.

initial evaluation25
INITIAL EVALUATION

CAUTION FOR COMPLIANCE VERIFICATION FORMS:

Be sure to check in the appropriate boxes that

  • the required assessments/checklists were performed, and
  • they were properly documented on the Notice and Eligibility Decision Regarding Special Education.
initial evaluation26
INITIAL EVALUATION

TYPES OF SLI ASSESSMENTS

  • Required standardized formal assessments
  • Medical records
  • Grades and curriculum-based assessments
  • Language samples
  • Observations
  • Interviews
  • Results of BBSST intervention, if appropriate
initial evaluation27
INITIAL EVALUATION

TYPES OF SLI ASSESSMENTS, cont’d

  • SLI-ARTICULATION CHECKLIST
  • SLI-VOICE DISORDER CHECKLIST
  • SLI – PHYSICIAN VOICE REFERRAL FORM
  • SLI – STUTTERING DISORDER CHECKLIST
  • SLI – LANGUAGE CHECKLIST
  • SLI CHECKLIST- PRESCHOOL
  • SLI – PREK OBSERVATIONS IN AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING
initial evaluation28
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI – ARTICULATION CHECKLIST

ARTICULATION PROFICIENCY

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION/INTELLIGIBILITY

initial evaluation29
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI – VOICE DISORDER CHECKLIST

VOICE BEHAVIOR

MEDICAL HISTORY

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION

initial evaluation30
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI – PHYSICIAN VOICE REFERRALFORM

REFERRAL INFO TO PHYSICIAN

PHYSICIAN’S DIAGNOSIS AND PERMISSION FOR THERAPY

REQUIRED FOR ELIGIBILITY!!

initial evaluation31
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI – STUTTERING CHECKLIST

STUTTERING BEHAVIORS

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE

CLASSROOM PARTICIPATION

initial evaluation32
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI – LANGUAGE CHECKLIST

BBSST REFERRAL?

DESCRIPTION OF LANGUAGE SKILLS

TESTING RESULTS

initial evaluation33
INITIAL EVALUATION

SLI –CHECKLIST: PRESCHOOL

COMPLETED BY TEACHER/PARENT/ CAREGIVER

DESCRIPTION OF SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS

initial evaluation34
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • SLI –CHECKLIST: PRESCHOOL
  • COMPLETED BY
  • PRE-K TEACHER OR
  • DAYCARE PROVIDER
  • DESCRIPTION OF SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
initial evaluation35
INITIAL EVALUATION

OTHER IMPORTANT FORMS AND PROCEDURES

  • Oral Peripheral Examination
  • Stimulability/connected speech checklist
  • Observation form from ALSDE website
  • Communication observation form
  • Interview documentation for stuttering assessment
initial evaluation36
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • ARTICULATION STIMULABILITY AND INTELLIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION, PAGE 1
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
initial evaluation37
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • ARTICULATION STIMULABILITY AND INTELLIGIBILITY DOCUMENTATION, PAGE 2
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
initial evaluation38
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • SLI – RATING OF INTELLIGIBILITY OF CONNECTED SPEECH
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
  • MEETS DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENT ON ELIGIBILITY FORM
initial evaluation39
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • COMMUNICATION OBSERVATION FORM
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
  • MEETS DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENT FOR FLUENCY AND VOICE ON ELIGIBILITY FORM
initial evaluation40
INITIAL EVALUATION
  • INTERVIEW WITH STUDENT AND/OR PARENT
  • Procedure required for stuttering referrals
  • Allows for student and parent interviews
  • Be sure to list on eligibility form and verification checklist.
initial evaluation41
INITIAL EVALUATION

WHEN ASSESSING STUDENTS WITH LEP OR DIALECTAL VARIATION, REMEMBER…

  • Tests must be provided and administered in child’s native language.
  • Use an interpreter/translator if SLP is not proficient in student’s native language.
  • Count only errors that are not result of being LEP.
  • For students speaking with dialectal variation, note differences on protocol but don’t count as errors. Only count nondialectal errors.
chapter iv
CHAPTER IV:

SLI ELIGIBILITY

GUIDELINES

sli eligibility guidelines
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES

ADVERSE EFFECT ON EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE

  • Not limited to academic performance
  • Determined on a case-by-case basis
  • Variety of sources should be used in determining eligibility
  • Checklist for each communication area available at www.alsde.edu.
sli eligibility guidelines44
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES

DOCUMENTATION OF APPROPRIATE INSTRUCTION

  • Answers question on eligibility form, “Was lack of appropriate instruction in math and/or reading, including essential components of reading instruction…or limited English proficiency the determining factor in the decision?”
  • Documentation forms for PreK, Elementary, and Secondary students at www.alsde.edu.
sli determination guidelines
SLI DETERMINATION GUIDELINES
  • SLI – DOCUMENTATION OF APPROPRIATE INSTRUCTION - PRESCHOOL
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
  • MEETS DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENT ON ELIGIBILITY FORM
sli determination guidelines46
SLI DETERMINATION GUIDELINES
  • DOCUMENTATION OF APPROPRIATE INSTRUCTION: ELEMENTARY GRADES
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
  • MEETS DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENT ON ELIGIBILITY FORM
sli determination guidelines47
SLI DETERMINATION GUIDELINES
  • DOCUMENTATION OF APPROPRIATE INSTRUCTION: SECONDARY GRADES
  • WHEN TO USE IT
  • HOW TO USE IT
  • MEETS DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENT ON ELIGIBILITY FORM
sli eligibility guidelines articulation
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES:ARTICULATION
  • Minimum of one standardized/formal articulation/phonological assessment
  • AAC does not require standardized score for eligibility determination for articulation
  • Stimulability assessment
  • Assessment of connected speech
sli eligibility guidelines articulation49
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES:ARTICULATION
  • Examination of oral structures/functioning
  • Documentation of impact of artic disorder on classroom and/or natural environment (checklist)
  • Documentation of appropriate instruction (documentation form)
sli eligibility guidelines voice
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES:VOICE
  • Formal assessment of student’s voice
    • AAC does not require standardized score/percentile rank for eligibility determination
  • Two diagnostic observations
  • Physician’s evaluation and permission for speech therapy (ALSDE form)
sli eligibility guidelines voice51
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES:VOICE
  • Documentation of impact of voice disorder on classroom and/or natural environment (checklist)
  • Documentation of appropriate instruction (documentation form)
sli eligibility guidelines fluency
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES:FLUENCY
  • Minimum of one formal fluency measure
    • ADLSE does not require standardized score/percentile rank for eligibility determination
  • Two diagnostic observations
  • Interviews with child, teacher and/or parent
sli eligibility guidelines fluency53
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES: FLUENCY
  • Documentation of impact of fluency disorder on classroom and/or natural environment (checklist)
  • Documentation of appropriate instruction (documentation form)
sli eligibility guidelines language
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES: LANGUAGE
  • Minimum of one comprehensive standardized formal comprehensive measure that assesses both receptive and expressive skills.
    • Student is eligible when total score is 70 or below.
    • Administer second language test to confirm language disorder when scores are above and below 70.
sli eligibility guidelines language55
SLI ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES: LANGUAGE
  • Documentation of impact of language disorder on classroom and/or natural environment (checklist)
  • Documentation of appropriate instruction (documentation form)
chapter v
CHAPTER V

DEVELOPMENT

OF THE

INDIVIDUALIZED

EDUCATION

PROGRAM

iep development
IEP DEVELOPMENT

The Alabama Administrative Code mandates that

“Public agencies must develop and implement procedures to ensure that all eligible children have an appropriate IEP based on the child’s unique needs and not on the child’s disability. This includes children placed in or referred to a private school or facility by the public agency.” (290-8-9.05).

iep development58
IEP DEVELOPMENT
  • The IEP team is responsible for reviewing all available assessments and developing the IEP.
  • The outcomes must be measured in accordance with the curriculum standards, extended standards, or preschool developmental standards.
  • The IEP team must develop a standards-based IEP that allows the child with a disability access to his/her grade level general education curriculum to the maximum extent possible. 
iep development59
IEP DEVELOPMENT

Academic Content Standards are found in

  • Alabama Courses of Study
  • Alabama Extended Standards
  • Continuum Guides
  • Curriculum Guides
  • Developmental Standards for Preschool Children with Disabilities
  • All can be accessed through the Alabama State Department of Education website at www.alsde.edu.
iep development60
IEP DEVELOPMENT

PROCESS CHART 3

REEVALUATION TO

DETERMINE

IF CHANGES

NEED TO BE

MADE

TO THE IEP

iep development61
IEP DEVELOPMENT

STEPS FOR DEVELOPING AN IEP

  • Send Notice of Proposed Meeting/Consent For Agency Participation to the parent
  • Collect and examine materials needed for developing a standards-based IEP
    • curriculum guides
    • eligibility form
    • work samples and other classroom data
    • assessment data
    • previous IEP
iep development62
IEP DEVELOPMENT

STEPS FOR DEVELOPING AN IEP

Analyze the data to develop the student’s profile, including

  • strengths
  • needs
  • how disability affects progress
  • assessment/evaluation
  • status of prior IEP goals
  • teacher/parent input
  • transition
iep development63
IEP DEVELOPMENT

STEPS FOR DEVELOPING AN IEP

  • Discuss “Special Instructional Factors”
  • Use data to summarize the student’s present level in the “Present Level of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance.”
    • strengths
    • needs (cite standard where student is currently functioning)
    • impact statement answering “How does the student’s disability affect mastery toward achievement of grade-level standards?”
iep development64
IEP DEVELOPMENT

ANNUAL GOALS

Write measurable annual goals to address the needs in the present level.

  • Annual goals answer the question

“What should the student be expected to accomplish within one school year?”

iep development65
IEP DEVELOPMENT

Measurable annual goals should include:

The student (Who)

Will do what (Behavior)

To what level or degree (Criterion)

Under what conditions (Conditions)

In what length of time (Timeframe)

iep development66
IEP DEVELOPMENT

DEVELOPING “SMART” IEP GOALS

  • Specific – based on the student’s “Present Level of Academic Achievement/Functional Performance”
  • Measurable – progress is objectively determined at frequent data points
  • Achievable – realistic, related to the most critical needs
  • Results-oriented- developed with a standard’s outcome in mind
  • Time-bound – clearly defined beginning and ending dates
iep development67
IEP DEVELOPMENT

The “Special Education and Related Services” section of the goal page describes the specially designed instruction needed by a student with a disability to accomplish IEP goals.

  • The “Special Education” section under “Type of Service(s)” must be completed for all students with an IEP.
  • Services for students whose disability area is SLI should be listed under “Special Education.”
  • Services for students for whom SLI is a related service should be listed under “Related Services.”
iep development68
IEP DEVELOPMENT

SPECIAL EDUCATION SECTION MUST BE COMPLETED

RELATED SERVICES

iep development69
IEP DEVELOPMENT

For each Special education or related service you must indicate:

  • type of service
  • anticipated frequency of service
  • amount of time
  • beginning/ending date of service
  • location of service
iep development70
IEP DEVELOPMENT

DETERMINING LRE

SLI students receiving services at the local school should be coded with the appropriate LRE based on the amount of time in the classroom. Ex. 2x per week for 30 min. = 02

  • SLI students receive services and are placed in a private school by the parent = 05
  • SLI student coming to therapy at your local school and is not in a local daycare or preschool = 19
iep development71
IEP DEVELOPMENT

IEP TEAM MEMBERS

  • Parent(s) of student
  • Not less than one general education teacher of the student
  • Not less than one special education teacher (SLP) of the student
  • An LEA representative
  • An individual to interpret instructional implications of evaluations (may be serving in one of the other roles-signs for both roles)
  • Others at the discretion of the parent or LEA
  • Student (where appropriate)
  • Representatives for transition services (for students ages sixteen and above)
iep development72
IEP DEVELOPMENT

SAMPLE

IEP FORMS OF

VARIOUS SLI DISABILITIES

AVAILABLE

ON

ALSDE WEBSITE

WWW.ALSDE.EDU

chapter vi
CHAPTER VI:

SERVICE

DELIVERY

service delivery
SERVICE DELIVERY

BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY MODELS

  • Consultation
  • Teaching/Co-teaching
  • Collaborative teaching
  • Serving small groups in the classroom
  • Serving individual students in the classroom
  • Group or individual pull-out
service delivery75
SERVICE DELIVERY

CO-TEACHING MODELS

  • One teach, one observe
  • One teach, one drift
  • Parallel teaching
  • Station Teaching
  • Alternative Teaching
  • Team Teaching
service delivery76
SERVICE DELIVERY

CHANGES IN SERVICE DELIVERY: OPTIONS

  • Request IEP meeting
    • 30 day timeline to meet and revise
  • Agree not to convene IEP Team (only with permission of Special Education Coordinator/Director and written procedure in place)
    • Develop a written document
    • Obtain parent’s written agreement to changes
    • Obtain new signature page for updated IEP
    • Update signatures on Persons Responsible for IEP Implementation form
    • Provide new copy of IEP with changes to parents
service delivery77
SERVICE DELIVERY

WHAT ABOUT MISSED SESSIONS?

  • IDEA does not address make-up sessions
  • Does interruption of services constitute a denial of FAPE?
  • Case-by Case decision
  • Best practice is to provide make-up
chapter vii
CHAPTER VII

REEVALUATION

POLICIES

AND

PROCEDURES

reevaluation
REEVALUATION

OVERVIEW

  • Reevaluation – at least every 3 years (or sooner if needed) to determine if student still is eligible for SPE services (Process Chart 2)
  • To determine if changes need to be made to existing IEP (Process Charts 3 and 5)
reevaluation continued eligibility
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

PART I: “CONTINUED ELIGIBILITY”

  • Not more than once a year unless parent and agency agree
  • Must be done every 3 years, unless parent and LEA deem unnecessary 
  • Make sure that the 3 year reevaluation is completed before the 3 year deadline.

·       

reevaluation continued eligibility81
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

WHEN ARE ADDITIONAL DATA NEEDED?

Examples:

  • If student has made significant progress and may no longer need SLI services (assessment NOT written as type of evaluation for goals)
  • If student receives speech, but IEP team thinks student may have a reading problem and proposes formal reading assessment.

·Be sure to obtain consent before starting reevaluation.

reevaluation continued eligibility82
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

After additional data are obtained:

  • If eligible, then sign new Notice and Eligibility Decision Regarding Special Education form, and amend IEP if appropriate.
  • If not eligible, complete Notice and Eligibility Decision Regarding Special Education and sign eligibility form saying not eligible, and refer to BBSST
reevaluation continued eligibility83
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

If additional data are not needed:

  • Mark “no additional data are needed” on Notice of IEP Team’s Decision Regarding Reevaluation.
  • No Notice of Eligibility Decision Regarding Special Education (eligibility) form is required.
reevaluation continued eligibility84
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

When are new eligibility reports required?

A new eligibility report is required when:

  • Additional data are requested
  • Student disability area changes
  • Student determined ineligible for services

No new eligibility report is needed when

  • Additional data are not needed
  • Student remains eligible in same disability area.
reevaluation continued eligibility85
REEVALUATIONCONTINUED ELIGIBILITY

After reevaluation is complete

  • If student determined ineligible, follow instructions on Process

Chart 2 in Mastering the Maze.

  • Make sure to refer student back to BBSST—A must!
reevaluation amending current iep
REEVALUATIONAMENDING CURRENT IEP

If a member of the IEP Team feels the current IEP is inadequate or inappropriate

  • The IEP Team must convene within 30 days to determine if additional evaluative data are needed
  • If IEP Team determines no additional evaluative data are needed, Process Chart 5 is followed.
reevaluation amending current iep87
REEVALUATIONAMENDING CURRENT IEP

If IEP Team determines additional evaluative data are needed

  • Remember this testing is not same as evaluating for eligibility
  • Use Process Chart 3
  • Be sure to amend annuals goals and/or benchmarks on annual goal page.
  • Be sure to indicate type(s) of evaluations that will be used to measure mastery.
  • Get signatures on signature page
  • Sign new Persons Responsible…form.
reevaluation transfer students
REEVALUATIONTRANSFER STUDENTS

IN-STATE TRANSFERS

  • If eligibility is current, IEP Team can accept with “No additional data needed.”
  • IEP Team may accept eligibility “as is,” but LEA may prefer a new eligibility form.
  • If student’s IEP does not meet state guidelines, student must be reevaluated.

OUT-OF-STATE TRANSFERS

  • Must be treated as an “initial evaluation.”
reevaluation special situations
REEVALUATIONSPECIAL SITUATIONS

DISMISSING STUDENTS FROM SLI

  • Student receiving services under SLI can exit after going through formal reevaluation process and being determined ineligible.
  • With appropriate documentation/evaluations, student may be found to be eligible for SPE services under another exceptionality.
  • Student may be dismissed through IEP if he/she had been added through an IEP under another exceptionality (as related service).
reevaluation special situations90
REEVALUATIONSPECIAL SITUATIONS

Reminder: New Language Eligibility Cut-off Score is 70

Currently eligible language students will remain eligible using “old” scores until 3 year reevaluation is due.

reevaluation conclusion
REEVALUATIONCONCLUSION

REMEMBER:

Keeping all these policies and procedures for reevaluation are confusing and a process in learning and remembering.

REFER TO:

  • SLI Policy and Procedures Manual
  • Mastering the Maze
  • Alabama Administrative Code
  • Go to www.alsde.edu.
chapter viii
CHAPTER VIII:

DOCUMENTATION

documentation
DOCUMENTATION

Importance of good documentation:

Paper is all that lasts.

  • Write with clarity and sensitivity
  • Fill in all required information
  • Organize all documents
documentation94
DOCUMENTATION

DAY-TO-DAY DOCUMENTATION

  • Lesson plans
  • Attendance records—Attendance records are required for Child Count verification
  • Therapy logs
  • Consultation forms
  • Session Progress Notes/Charts
documentation95
DOCUMENTATION

THERAPY

AND

ATTENDANCE

RECORDS

documentation96
DOCUMENTATION

CONSULT SERVICE DELIVERY RECORD

documentation97
DOCUMENTATION

Finding the time:

  • Develop a documentation system
  • Schedule a daily time

Summary: Proper documentation

  • improves your effectiveness as a therapist
  • benefits your students
  • is often requested in due process litigation.
chapter ix
CHAPTER IX:

SLI AND STUDENTS WITH

LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY

sli and lep
SLI AND LEP
  • Some students with LEP will require special education services.
  • To be eligible, they must have a true disability, not just a language difference.
sli and lep100
SLI AND LEP

A student with LEP will not be judged eligible for SLI services unless it can be demonstrated that the impairment also occurs in his/her native language, and not only because of limited exposure to English (AAC).

sli and lep101
SLI AND LEP

STAGES OF ACQUIRING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE:

  • BICS (Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills)
  • CALP (Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency)

Factors affecting progress should be considered.

sli and lep102
SLI AND LEP

Tests for students with LEP must :

  • Be administered in child’s native language unless clearly not feasible
  • Be properly developed and/or modified for their needs
  • Measure extent of disability, not student’s English language skills.
sli and lep103
SLI AND LEP

If an assessment is not administered under standardized conditions, you must describe the extent to which it varied from standard conditions (i.e., using a translator/interpreter) on the eligibility report.

sli and lep104
SLI AND LEP

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/MATERIALS

  • Prereferral intervention applies to LEP students
  • After referral has been made:
      • SLP takes case history
      • Classroom teacher completes speech and/or language checklists
      • SLP completes observations
sli and lep105
SLI AND LEP

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/MATERIALS, CONT’D:

  • ELL teacher completes report of student’s current linguistic status
  • Testing is administered:
    • Report on eligibility form if interpreter administered test or if test was not normed for LEP students
    • Simply translating tests is not appropriate
    • Use informal language measures
    • Use classroom data
sli and lep106
SLI AND LEP

INTERPRETATION OF RESULTS

  • Which error patterns predominate?
  • How does the native language interfere with English acquisition/production?
  • Is the error relevant in terms of age appropriateness?
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SLI AND LEP

SERVICE DELIVERY FOR STUDENTS WITH LEP AND SLI:

  • Language of instruction and student response should be clearly defined in IEP.
  • If L1 is weak, introduction of L2 will create additional learning difficulties
  • SLP, ELL, and classroom teachers should collaborate.
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SLI AND LEP

“If the child requires instruction in basic concepts, vocabulary, and structures in his native language, it is not required that the SLP be the main professional responsible for such training, especially if he/she does not speak the native language of the child” (AAC).

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SLI AND LEP

USE OF INTERPRETERS AND TRANSLATORS

  • Interpretersorally translate
  • Translators convert written material
  • Use professionals, not family members if possible
  • If using interpreted or translated materials, discuss relative strengths and weaknesses rather than just test scores.
chapter x
CHAPTER X

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

AND

AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION

at aac
AT/AAC

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

FOR AT/AAC

  • Who provides services
  • Definitions of AT/AAC
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AT/AAC

CONSIDERATION OF AT/AAC

  • IEP Process
  • Assessments
    • STAR—Statewide Technology Access and Response System
    • INCH—INteraction Checklist for Augmentative Communication
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AT/AAC
  • Assessments, cont’d.
    • WATI—Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative
    • GPAT—Georgia Project for Assistive Technology
    • SETT—Student, Environment, Tasks, Tools
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AT/AAC

AT/AAC SELECTION/SERVICES

  • Symbols
  • Aids
  • Strategies
  • Techniques
at aac115
AT/AAC

OTHER ISSUES

  • Cochlear Implants
  • Funding
  • Ownership
chapter xi
CHAPTER XI

RESPONSE

TO

INTERVENTION

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RTI

What is RTI?

RTI refers to a process of intensive, researched-based direct intervention developed and implemented to meet the needs of a student prior to referral and assessment for special education.

slide118
RTI
  • A successful “responseto intervention” suggests student does not have a disability and does not need SPE services in that area.
  • Failure to respond to intervention suggests student may have a disability in that area.
slide119
RTI

Why is it important?

IDEA (2004) allows its use as an alternative to the “discrepancy model” for eligibility determination for SLD.

What is its rationale?

Some argue that the “discrepancy model” prevents some struggling students from receiving SPE services because they lack the necessary discrepancy between IQ and achievement, especially young students and students with LEP.

slide120
RTI

Since RTI relates to Reg. Ed. and SLD determination, how may the SLP be involved?

The SLP may be asked to:

  • advise on intervention strategies during the RTI process
  • interpret data during pre- and post- assessment and implementation
  • provide some related intervention as she works in the classroom.
slide121
RTI

Are SLPs qualified to be involved in RTI?

Yes, because of their expertise in:

  • Phonemic awareness
  • Phonics instruction
  • Vocabulary development
  • Text comprehension
  • Written expression
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RTI

What is the status of use of RTI in Alabama?

  • Person named to coordinate RTI
  • Panel assembled
chapter xii
CHAPTERXII

SWALLOWING

AND

FEEDING

DISORDERS

(DYSPHAGIA)

dysphagia
DYSPHAGIA

School-based SLPs are finding their roles expanding in the areas of swallowing and feeding disorders (dysphagia) because of:

  • Inclusion of students with severe impairments in “home” school rather than special facility
  • Federal legislation
  • Recent court judgments
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DYSPHAGIA

How would the student with dysphagia be served by the SLP?

  • Typically as a related service, because most students with dysphagia have multiple disabilities
  • A student does not qualify for an articulation disorder if the sole disability is an abnormal swallowing pattern (AAC).
dysphagia126
DYSPHAGIA

CAUTION:

Because of potential serious consequences of dysphagia, it is critical that SLPs and other professionals/personnel have adequate training/expertise in working with this disorder, or

  • Refer students to professionals with adequate training/expertise, then work under their supervision.
dysphagia127
DYSPHAGIA

Because of the serious implications of dysphagia disorders, if school systems decide to provide direct services, personnel are urged to develop and implement systemwide policies and procedures for students with suspected or diagnosed dysphagia.

dysphagia128
DYSPHAGIA

TYPES OF DYSPHAGIA TEAMS

  • School-based Dysphagia Team
  • School System Team
  • Combination Team
    • School-based dysphagia-trained SLPs within assigned school, teamed with
    • Traveling “expert” SLP from school system or outside consultant.
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DYSPHAGIA

Who should be on the Dysphagia Team?

  • Dysphagia case manager
  • SLP
  • OT
  • School nurse
  • Classroom teacher
  • Personal assistants
  • School counselor/social worker
dysphagia130
DYSPHAGIA

Dysphagia Team, cont’d.

  • School nutrition manager/cafeteria manager
  • School administrator
  • Community specialists experienced with children’s dysphagia
  • Parent/primary caregiver
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DYSPHAGIA

All professionals/staff, from the classroom teacher to the P.E. coach to the lunchroom staff, should sign the Persons Responsible for IEP Implementation form to confirm they have been made aware of the child’s condition and procedures to follow.

chapter xiii
CHAPTER XIII

SPEECH-

LANGUAGE

PATHOLOGY

ASSISTANTS

(SLPA)

slide133
SLPA

On August 7, 2005, the AL Board of Education voted to allow use of bachelor level SLPAs in Alabama public schools.

There are strict guidelines regarding who may be hired as an SLPA and the requirements regarding progress toward the master’s degree.

slide134
SLPA

The SLPA must hold

  • A bachelor’s degree in speech-language pathology.
  • At Level I, the SLPA must work 2 out of the first 3 years, and earn 12 semester hours toward a master’s degree in speech pathology or special education.
  • Level I is not renewable.
  • At Level II, the SLPA must have earned 12 additional semester hours within 5 years plus 50 additional hours of staff development as required to maintain Teacher Certification.
slide135
SLPA

The school system’s superintendent must apply for the prospective SLPA to hold an Alabama SLPA certificate.

slide136
SLPA

GUIDELINES FOR SLPAs

  • Must be supervised by a master’s level SLP or SPE coordinator with certification in SPE
  • May only perform tasks for which they are trained
  • Should meet regularly with supervisor
slide137
SLPA

STAGES OF SUPERVISION

  • Evaluative-Feedback Stage (directive, active supervisory style)
  • Transitional Stage (allowing SLPA more active role in decision-making, offering input as needed)
  • Self-supervision (more consultative model, except when instruction in new technique is required)
slide138
FYI

To locate forms on the Alabama State Department of Education website,

  • Type in www.alsde.edu on Internet
  • Click on “Sections” on left menu
  • Click on “Special Education” in drop-down menu
  • Click on “Disability Areas” at the top