the 8rs canadian library human resource study news from the front n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 51

The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 79 Views
  • Uploaded on

The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front. Allison Sivak Canadian Association of Law Libraries May 9, 2006. Starting Question. Will there be a shortage of librarians in the next 5 to 10 years due to mass retirements? A ‘simple’ question, no simple answers

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front' - minerva-hendricks


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
the 8rs canadian library human resource study news from the front

The 8Rs Canadian Library Human Resource Study: News from the Front

Allison Sivak

Canadian Association of Law Libraries

May 9, 2006

starting question
Starting Question
  • Will there be a shortage of librarians in the next 5 to 10 years due to mass retirements?
  • A ‘simple’ question, no simple answers
  • In the process we learned:
    • No clear succession crisis
    • Urgency in other areas of library human resources:
      • Competencies, particularly management and leadership
      • Education and training
      • Workloads and quality of work, work-life balance
      • Role overlap between librarians and paraprofessionals
      • Focus on recruitment, not as much on retirement
objective
Objective
  • Comprehensive investigation of issues around recruitment, retention, remuneration, repatriation, rejuvenation, reaccreditation, retirement, and restructuring (the 8Rs) in the Canadian library context
the 8rs
The 8Rs
  • Recruitment
  • Retention
  • Remuneration
  • Repatriation
  • Reaccreditation
  • Rejuvenation
  • Retirement
  • Restructuring
project scope
Project Scope
  • 3-year study of unprecedented breadth and depth
  • 167 data tables
  • Over 900 variables
  • 275-page report (English and French)
  • Analyses of data by library sectors and sub-sectors
  • 2006 Librarian / Library Technician Education Study: Cultural Human Resources Council / CLA
methods
Methods
  • Institutional Survey
    • 1,357 surveys sent to libraries
    • 34% response rate overall (461 respondents)
    • 36% public libraries
    • 50% academic libraries
    • 26% special libraries
  • Individual Survey
    • Web survey sent to 8,626 library workers
    • Response rate of 36.5% (3,148 respondents)
    • Additional 1,545 responses collected through listserv
    • Total of 4,693 responses
lack of diversity in libraries
(Lack of) Diversity in Libraries
  • Visible Minorities
    • 7% of librarians and paraprofessionals
    • 4% of all senior administrators
    • Special libraries have slightly higher representation of visible minority staff
  • Aboriginal
    • 1% of librarians across career levels
    • 2% of paraprofessionals
slide13

Table E.9: Predicted Librarian Retirements within the Next 5 and 10 Years by Geographic Location (Based on min. age of retirement of 62 Years) (Individual Survey; n=1,886)

slide14

Table J.3: Predicted Future Librarian Supply

Table J.5: Predicted Future Library Technician Supply

slide15

TOTAL

9

TOTAL ACADEMIC

10

CARL

23

Other Academic

3

TOTAL PUBLIC

10

CULC

31

Other Public

6

TOTAL SPECIAL

8

Government

14

Non-Profit

5

For-Profit

0

0

10

20

30

40

Percent

Figure E.2: Organizations with Succession Plan

by Library Sector (Institutional Survey; n=276)

slide17

Table D.10: Location of Library Applied to by Sector (Recent Professional Librarian Entrants, Individual Survey; n=356)

Percent Applying to Location

slide18

Figure D.4: Why Applied Outside of Canada

(Recent Professional Librarian Entrants Only, Individual Survey; n=112)

slide20

Table D.5: Recruitment Need and Activity by

Province/Region (Institutional Survey; n=278)

slide23

Table G.7: Percent of Recent Librarian Entrants Agreeing that MLIS Program Provided Skills to Effectively Perform their Jobs by Library Sector

implications
Implications
  • Environmental factors: how to deal with limited budgets, etc.
  • Need to attract the best and brightest to the profession and to individual libraries
  • Need to ensure strong candidates get leadership and management development
  • Much of the training and development responsibility currently lies with libraries
    • How can associations and library schools play a role?
  • How will libraries predict what competencies are needed as time goes on?
  • Will the knowledge economy mean greater competition for highly-skilled library staff?
    • Large research libraries will be the winners
    • Small or rural libraries may find recruitment & retention issues compounding over time
slide25

Table K.3: Indicators of Demand for Management and Leadership Skills by Library Sector

(Institutional Survey; n=274)

librarian interest in management and leadership roles
Librarian Interest in Management and Leadership Roles
  • Librarians stating “it is important to have a job that allows me to….”
    • Manage a service/dept: 44%
    • Supervise others: 36%
    • Perform a leadership role: 62%
    • Motivate others: 64%
    • Seek out new project opportunities: 74%
role shifts
Role Shifts
  • Traditional librarian duties are being taken on in an increasing capacity by paraprofessional staff
  • 78% of institutions reported that paraprofessionals have taken on more of these responsibilities over the past 5 years
  • Role shift expected to continue to over the next 5 years
job satisfaction
Job Satisfaction
  • 79% of librarians and paraprofessionals state they are “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their jobs
workload manageability and stress
Workload Manageability and Stress
  • Agreeing workload manageable
    • Librarians: 39%
    • Paraprofessionals: 53%
  • Agreeing they have little job-related stress
    • Librarians: 24%
    • Paraprofessionals: 35%
  • Agreeing job allows work-life balance
    • Librarians: 62%
    • Paraprofessionals: 75%
slide31

Table I.20: Respectful Treatment of Librarians and Paraprofessionals by Library Sector (Individual Survey)

slide32

Table K.10: Paraprofessional Adoption of Professional Roles by Library Sector (Institutional and Individual Surveys)

slide34

Table H.2: Librarians Needing Significant Training by Career Level of Librarian by Library Sector (Institutional Survey; n=270)

slide36

Table H.3: Organization Provides Sufficient Opportunities to Participate in Training by Career Stage by Library Sector

(Professional Librarians Only; Individual Survey; n=1,897)

chrc education study
CHRC Education Study
  • Existing data: Online curriculum and professional development offerings and educator-provided program information
  • Phase I Employers’ Survey: Conducted in June 2003 of 461 employers and an abbreviated Phase II Employers’ Survey conducted in December 2005 of 58 employers.
  • In-depth telephone Interviews with Deans/Directors and program heads representing the MLIS and 16 LIT programs in Canada
  • Current Student Survey: Conducted in February 2006 of 857 MLIS/LIS students
  • Professional Librarian and Paraprofessional Staff Survey: Conducted in June/July 2004 of 4,693 professional librarians and paraprofessional staff
mlis programs
MLIS Programs
  • None of the 7 programs have a formal recruitment policy
    • most schools rely primarily on their website as a marketing tool.
  • Most students learned of their MLIS program through the program’s website (77%) or by word of mouth (60%)
  • The number of applicants to Canadian MLIS programs has increased by 67% over the past 5 years (from 907 in 2000 to 1511 in 2004)
  • Between 2000 and 2005, enrolments increased by 33%
lit programs
LIT Programs
  • Applications to LIT programs increased by 19% between 2000/2001 and 2004/2004, though there is a great deal of variation across individual institutions.
  • In the past 5 years, LIT application rates increased by 19% and enrollments increased by 17%
mlis programs1
MLIS Programs
  • An analysis of core required courses for all MLIS students across Canada show a generalist orientation
    • All LIS programs require students to take at least one course in management/business/leadership, and research
    • 6 LIS programs require coursework in IT and issues/history/foundations
    • 3 require coursework in public service and technical/bibliographic service
    • 1 requires a collections course
  • Most Deans/Directors noted recent increases in IT or management-related curriculum.
  • All 7 schools offer a practicum component, with 3 of these being mandatory for students.
    • Several schools offer other opportunities professional experience or networking
  • Virtually all employers felt that candidates for professional librarian positions should
    • possess good communication skills
    • possess good interpersonal skills
    • be able to learn new skills
    • be able to respond flexibly to change.
mlis programs2
MLIS Programs
  • Students see the largest gap between perceived importance and provision of business skills, followed by leadership and managerial skills
  • 46% of students agreed that their program is providing them with a realistic depiction of what is like to work as a librarian or in a related profession
  • 68% of current students expressed satisfaction with the overall quality of their education
  • 75% of the employers agreed with the statement that education provided in MLIS programs equips graduates with the competencies required to be professional librarians at their organizations
  • Suggestions for improvement:
    • Students and recent graduates: more practical training
    • Employers: improvements to management-related curriculum
lit programs1
LIT Programs
  • The single focus of LIT programs is to ensure graduates have applied (as opposed to theoretical) knowledge that will enhance their employability
  • Technical & bibliographic courses and information technology courses together comprise 40% of all required courses across the country
lit programs2
LIT Programs
  • Important competencies for paraprofessional / lib tech staff according to employers:
    • interpersonal/people skills 100%
    • organizational commitment 95%
    • communication skills 93%
  • Most important and difficult to fulfill competencies when recruiting library technicians:
    • the ability to respond flexibly to change
    • IT skills
    • public service skills
lit programs3
LIT Programs
  • Minor gaps between important competencies and their provision in the diploma program
  • 78% of current LIT students agreed that their program is providing them with a realistic depiction of what it is like to work as a library technician
  • 83% of current LIT students expressed overall satisfaction with their program
  • 90% of employers believe that LIT diploma programs adequately equip students for the workplace
  • Suggestions for improvement
    • Current students: better course content
    • Employers: better technology skills training and more specialized training
implications1
Implications
  • No smoking gun: there appears to be no imminent crisis in library staff supply and demand
  • We haven’t shattered the myth of a shortage in the library workforce, but softened it
  • There remain pressing issues for the library community to examine
implications2
Implications
  • Shifting roles experienced between librarian and paraprofessional staff
  • Access to education for all staff
    • Base education programs
    • Continuing professional development
  • Leadership and management potential and competencies of new and existing staff
  • Library programs must consider the real-world demands that both institutions and staff experience
charge to the community
Charge to the Community
  • Recruitment isn’t about numbers, but about qualities and competencies
    • Management, leadership, IT
  • Recruitment isn’t just to institutions, but to the profession
    • Convergence between the profession and the schools
  • Recognize potential in staff and create structures to encourage growth
  • Address the challenge of increasing and supporting diversity in the library workforce
charge to the community1
Charge to the Community
  • Build greater accessibility to library education programs
  • Commit to professional development for all library workers
    • Take on leadership and management development as core competencies to be nurtured within the workforce
    • Gain greater understanding of role shifts and how they define core competencies
    • What do new and mid-career staff see as necessary competencies?
    • How can training barriers (due to limited budgets) be addressed?
getting the information out
Getting the Information Out

Study available for free download (both languages) from:

http://www.ls.ualberta.ca/8rs

CLA President’s Council

Cultural Human Resources Council Training Gaps Analysis download:

http://www.culturalhrc.ca/research/default-e.asp

studies sponsors and supporters
Studies’ Sponsors and Supporters
  • University of Alberta
  • Canadian Association of Research Libraries
  • Canadian Urban Libraries Council
  • Library and Archives Canada
  • Alberta Community Development, Government of Alberta
  • Canadian Library Association
  • Cultural Human Resources Council / Human Resources and Skills Development Canada