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Chemical Reactions: Glow Sticks. Abraham Torres, Kevin Wakefield, and Allison Woods CHM110 January 21, 2013 CHERYL BURLEIGH. Development of the Glow Stick. Modern glow stick was invented by Herbert Richter and Ruth Tedrick . A patent was filed in March of 1973 and awarded in June of 1974.

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chemical reactions glow sticks
Chemical Reactions: Glow Sticks

Abraham Torres, Kevin Wakefield, and Allison Woods

CHM110

January 21, 2013

CHERYL BURLEIGH

development of the glow stick
Development of the Glow Stick
  • Modern glow stick was invented by Herbert Richter and Ruth Tedrick. A patent was filed in March of 1973 and awarded in June of 1974.
  • Glow sticks were developed by the United States Navy.
practical applications of glow sticks
Practical Applications of Glow Sticks
  • Military Use
  • Entertainment
  • Camping
  • Recreational Diving
  • Disaster and Emergency Situations
what is a glow stick
What is a Glow Stick?
  • Plastic casing containing isolated chemicals.
  • Inner glass vial contains hydrogen peroxide.
  • Phenyl oxalate and fluorescent dye solution.
  • Hydrogen peroxide solution.
  • Isolated chemicals mix triggering an exothermic reaction that generates light. This is known as Chemoluminescence.
chemical reaction behind the light
Chemical Reaction Behind the Light
  • Glow sticks are activated when the isolated chemicals hydrogen peroxide and diphenyl oxalate react, releasing phenol and cyclic peroxide.
  • Peroxides are an ideal reactant because the bonds between the oxygen atoms are easily broken releasing energy.
  • The cyclic peroxide then interacts with a fluorescent dye molecule releasing 2 molecules of carbon dioxide and exciting the electrons of the dye, it is the fluorescent dye that responsible for the color the glow stick. When the electrons relax, a photon of light energy is released.
summary
Summary
  • Glow sticks were developed by the United States Navy and was awarded a patent in 1974.
  • The glow stick has many practical applications.
  • A glow stick is a single use short term light source that is contained within a plastic tube. This tube contains isolated chemicals and when mixed together, the chemical reaction that follows produces light energy. This is known as Chemoluminescence.
  • Chemoluminescence is an exothermic chemical reaction.
  • Fluorophores determine the color of the light emitted.
references
References
  • About Chemistry (n.d). Glow Stick Chemical Reaction retreived 1/17/2013 from http://chemistry.about.com/od/imagesclipartstructures/ig/Chemical- Reactions/Glowstick-Chemical-Reaction.htm
  • Helmenstine, A. M. (n.d.). Light Stick Colors. Retrieved from http://chemistry.about.com/library/weekly/aa031703a.htm
  • Light made through chemical reactions: Chemoluminescence. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.webexhibits.org/causesofcolor/4AD.html
  • United States Patent Office. (n.d.). United States Patent 3,819,925. Retrieved from http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph- Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2 Fsearch- bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PALL&s1=3819925.PN.&OS=P N/38199 25&RS=PN/3819925
  • Welsh, E. (2011). What is Chemoluminescence? Retrieved from http://www.scienceinschool.org/repository/docs/issue19_chemilumine scence.pdf