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Laptop Usage / Cybersafety Seminar Wednesday 23 May 2012 PowerPoint Presentation
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Laptop Usage / Cybersafety Seminar Wednesday 23 May 2012 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Laptop Usage / Cybersafety Seminar Wednesday 23 May 2012. Outline. Introduction Using technology Technology in education Kureosity How staff use Kureosity How students use Kureosity How parents can use Kureosity Use of ICT in the classroom Cybersafety Tips for parents Q and A.

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slide2

Outline

  • Introduction
  • Using technology
  • Technology in education
  • Kureosity
  • How staff use Kureosity
  • How students use Kureosity
  • How parents can use Kureosity
  • Use of ICT in the classroom
  • Cybersafety
  • Tips for parents
  • Q and A
slide3

Introduction

Facebook now has over 900 million users

Twitter has over 140 million users

2009 – 10-18 years of age spending more time online than watching television

95% of teens are online every day

3.9 million teens are online via their phone

(This figure is from June 2011 – it is changing rapidly!)

90% of 12-17 year olds use social media

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4MnpzG5SqcKony 2012

slide4

Digital natives

This generation of students are often referred to as ‘digital natives’ – they have never known a world without the technologies that exist today.

Digital citizen

Generation i

Efforts by adults to keep up mean that we have even developed glossaries to try and track the online vernacular:

http://www.cyberbullying.org/

slide8

Concerns regarding online interactions

i

Wall Street Journal (@WSJ)5/22/12 4:40 AMMore than a third of divorce filings last year contained the word "Facebook." sm.wsj.com/KXmGKi Via @SmartMoney

slide12

Social networking

  • Social networking means that students now share information more willingly and in more detail than ever before.
  • Sharing beyond immediate friendship group
  • Sharing information beyond what we consider to be a sensible and responsible norm
  • Headspace survey:
  • 75% of young people use the internet to connect
  • 39% of young people use the internet to look up information
  • (Interestingly, in terms of advice and support, young people go to: friends, parents, relatives/other adults, internet… teachers, counsellors.)
slide13

Computers at St Paul’s

  • A laptop school since 1996
  • For Year 7s in 2012, we have moved to a leasing scheme
  • Reduced cost for parents
  • Uniformity for IT department
  • The School realised quite early, that information and communication technology was going to play an ever increasing role in almost all aspects of our lives. The decision was taken at an early stage to equip our students with the tools that would allow them to independently research and present information and (later) to interact using these technologies. The technology has changed enormously over the years, but the intent remains to provide the tools for learning to each child in the secondary school as cost effectively as possible. – Mr Robert Jacob
slide14

Technology – fear or foster?

According to Rachel Botsman, social innovator and researcher, there are four key phases of technology:

Information sharing (internet, wikipedia, blogs)

Connecting or re-connecting with people (Myspace, facebook)

Co-production, sharing and exchanging (youtube, twitter, flickr)

(Now…) Applying and sharing behaviours that are entering other parts of our lives

Botsman: “People are now saying: ‘Isn’t this a Gen Y thing? Isn’t this creating a generation gap? Isn’t this turning us into disconnected cyber borks?’ No. It’s doing the opposite!”

Botsman: Technology is taking us back to old market behaviours, moving from a ‘cultural me’ to a ‘cultural we’.

slide15

St Paul’s approach to technology

  • Technology is not something to be feared but an asset to be embraced and utilised.
  • Values provide the cornerstone for using technology effectively and responsibly. Software or legislation (government level or via school rules) will not solve key issues.
  • Susan McLean – “Respect + Responsibility”
  • Encouraging positive communication
  • Highlighting the importance of developing a positive digital reputation
slide16

St Paul’s approach to technology

  • Proxy site users are checked regularly
  • If an incident online affects members of our community, then we will investigate
  • If a student presents a hard copy of an online discussion, then we will investigate
slide17

KureosityWhat is Kureosity and how do we use it effectively to promote student teaching and learning?

slide19

History of Kureosity

  • What is MOODLE?
    • Moodle is a web application that educators can use to create effective online learning sites. Moodle has been developed by teachers for teacher and student interaction. Moodle is also known as the following:
    • Course Management System (CMS),
    • Learning Management System (LMS)
    • Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
  • Why use the MOODLE platform?
  • Both student and adult educational institutions utilize MOODLE for the delivery of their course and to actively engage students in and out of the classroom
slide20

History of Kureosity

Naming Competition 2009

Knowledge

Understand

Respect

Encourage

O

S

I

T

Y

Modular

Object

Oriented

Dynamic

Learning

Environment

“Because curiosity is essential for learning, creative thinking and understanding all the wonderful things there are to know.”

slide21

Teachers create course information

Students can save their work - backup system

Students access course information

Parents can access some areas of Kureosity without a username and password

Kureosity also allows interaction between student and teacher inside and outside the classroom

Kureosity also allows interaction between students

slide24

MAHARA ePortfolio

Teachers create course information

Students can save their work - backup system

Students access course information

Parents can access some areas of Kureosity without a username and password

Kureosity also allows interaction between student and teacher inside and outside the classroom

Kureosity also allows interaction between students

slide25

Mahara

“Mahara is a fully featured electronic portfolio, weblog, resume builder and social networking system, connecting users and creating online communities. Mahara provides you with the tools to set up a personal learning and development environment.“

slide26

ICT in the classroom

  • Advantages and potential of digital technologies
  • Information accessible
  • Impact on student material
slide28

Cybersafety

  • Risks include:
  • Cyberbullying
  • Promotion of harmful behaviours
  • Advertisements for adult products
  • Exposing young people to inappropriate material
  • Benefits:
  • Deliver educational outcomes
  • Facilitate supportive relationships
  • Enable identity formation
  • Promote a sense of belonging and self esteem
  • Donna Cross (USA), cited by Dr Jane Burns, CEO Young and Well Co-operative Research Centre – www.yawcrc.com.au
slide29

Risk v Reward

  • “A large part of this generation’s social and emotional formation and development is occurring while on the internet and on mobile phones. Research further identifies the limited capacity young people have for self-regulation, making them vulnerable to peer pressure and increasing personal risk as they navigate and experiment with social media.”
  • - Dr Paul Rumble, University of the Sunshine Coast
  • “Growing up Digital: the rise of the net generation”
  • – Don Tapscott
  • Rather than technology stupefying, they might be the smartest generation yet
slide30

Cyberbullying

  • 85% of bullying online is witnessed by people who can – but choose not to – intervene
  • Cyberbullying victims and aggressors know in each other in ‘real life’ in most cases
  • Anonymous – lack of empathy without face to face interaction
  • Most cyberbullying happens outside of school
  • The speed of the proliferation of images is frightening
  • The ‘audience’ is the entire internet, or world on the wide web
  • Students are reluctant to report cyberbullying because they have learnt that if it is not handled well by a teacher then the situation becomes worse.
  • Ibid: because parents usually react by simply removing the technology.
slide31

Cyberbullies – why do they do it?

  • A sense of entitlement
  • All of them want their 15 megabytes of fame
  • Because they can
  • Thrill of anonymity, freedom
  • They are looking for their ‘space’
  • The ‘heat is on traditional forms of bullying’ ie schools have taken huge steps to address these areas
  • Lack of inhibition - Bill Belsey
slide33

Advice for parents

  • Parents need to be engaged and educated
  • Students (victims) can be given scenarios and scripts that have been used with ‘traditional’ bullying adapted to suit online situations.
  • Be reasonable
  • Be open – establish a level of trust
  • Online activity to be in an open area
  • Try to get them to share their pages/blogs/accounts – to show you some things they are doing
  • Parents should consider having a facebook page so they understand how it works
  • Students should be reminded about the information on their page and how
slide34

Advice for parents

  • Students should be reminded that sexting is classified as the dissemination of child pornography
  • Parents need to model good behaviour (by the way they use their phone/blackberry/computer)
  • Secure wireless networks
  • Computers in shared spaces

Let kids know they ARE responsible for their online behaviour towards others

slide35

Advice for parents

''The kind of public life we see online has never existed before,'' Dr Boyd told Fairfax Media ahead of her lecture at RMIT on Thursday. ''But it's a myth that teens don't care about privacy. It's really impressive what teens do to find new ways to be private in public.''

Parents who want to help their children navigate an online social minefield need to educate and communicate, not berate, restrict or panic, Dr Boyd said. ''The way forward is to have open conversations, to really have a dialogue of trust … if you engage in surveillance and break that trust, you'll teach them not to talk to you.''

slide36

Summary

  • We ARE responsible for our behaviour
  • Online is a privilege, not a right
  • We are not anonymous, we leave a digital footprint
  • Real world effects from online actions
  • Responsibility
  • Teach kids to think before they click
  • What is said cannot be taken back
  • Laws and filters will only be marginally effective
  • Trust and empower kids
  • Effective solutions are considered and implemented in context
  • Lead through trust and teaching, not fear, banning and legislation
  • Model appropriate behaviour
  • No quick fixes

“Cyberbullying is about people and relationships, not technology.”

- Bill Belsey (NCAB Conference, 2010)

slide37

Websites

Websites

www.

www.yawcrc.org.au

http://www.ncab.org.au/

http://www.amf.org.au/

www.reachout.com.au

www.healthinsite.gov.au/topics/bullying

www.cyberbullying.ca (Canada)

www.bullying.org (Canada)

Easy read: Destroying Avalon – Kate McAffrey