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Inauguration Adress By: John F. Kennedy. Karla Brun 4 th block H. English 2 April 8, 2013. Background Information. John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Missouri in May 29, 1917.

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inauguration adress by john f kennedy

Inauguration AdressBy: John F. Kennedy

Karla Brun

4th block

H. English 2

April 8, 2013

background information
Background Information
  • John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Missouri in May 29, 1917.
  • John F. Kennedy was the 35th president in the United States in office serving during January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963.
  • He was first person born in the 20th century to serve as president.
  • One of his major acts during his presidency was the African-American Civil Rights Movement, and early stages of the Vietnam War.
  • Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963.
video of speech
Video of Speech
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4phB-rRjYQw
soapstone subject
Soapstone – Subject
  • SUBJECT: JFK goal with this speech was let America know that this is a new beginning for society as well as a change by welcoming in the 20th century. As JFK said in his speech…..
  • “Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans—born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, proud of our ancient heritage”
soapstone occasion
Soapstone – Occasion
  • OCCASION- The occasion for this speech was JFK speaking to America as well as the rest of the world as the new president of the United States.
  • The day he was giving his Inaugural Address was on January 20th, 1961.
soapstone audience
Soapstone – Audience
  • AUDIENCE- The audience was America as a whole, but I also think that this speech was geared also towards the rest of the world.
  • But there were many occasion where JFK would mention the rest of the world as well, for example… “My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.”
soapstone purpose
Soapstone – Purpose
  • PURPOSE- The purpose of the speech was to accept and show America what his plans for the future of him as president will be like, as well as attempt to show America what kind of country we are and how we can unify by not only helping America as whole but the rest of the world.
  • One of the my favorite quotes of JFK said to show the audience what he wants to do for the rest of the world is “If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.”
soapstone speaker
Soapstone – Speaker
  • SPEAKER- The speaker is John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United states.
  • He not only influenced and helped but also inspired America and many people around the world.
soapstone tone
Soapstone – Tone
  • TONE- JFK’s tone through out the whole speech was hopeful, inspiring, powerful.
analysis paraphrases
Analysis – Paraphrases
  • Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty. This much we pledge—and more.
  • This paragraph support an idea of what the president wants to overcome in his term. He states that whatever burden they come across, whatever hardship they meet, he will maintain this country in liberty and free. This shows the audience that he will attempt to overcome whatever obstacle as president.
analysis paraphrases1
Analysis – Paraphrases
  • And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.
  • This is such a strong quote showing American’s that we are what make this country and we have the choice to choose what we do with it.
main idea
Main Idea
  • “With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love, asking His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own.”
  • This quote goes from explaining that from this moment on we are moving forward, bringing a change, a renewal to society in the U.S.
logos
Logos
  • To that world assembly of sovereign states, the United Nations, our last best hope in an age where the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace we renew our pledge of support—to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective—to strengthen its shield of the new and the weak—and to enlarge the area in which its writ may run.
  • He tries to explain that we put too much emphasis on killing rather than living.
pathos
Pathos
  • “His blessing and His help, but knowing that here on earth God's work must truly be our own.”
  • This shows the pathos emotional side of the president as he shows that he believe strongly on the lord’s blessing and help but he knows that it is up to us bring it here on earth.
ethos
Ethos
  • To those peoples in the huts and villages across the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery, we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, for whatever period is required—not because the Communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right. If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.
  • This quote makes JFK appear as a genuine kind person who in reality wants to help out the world not because he wants that kind of fame but because he knows its right.
repetition
Repetition
  • In this speech JFK kept on repeating “Let both sides” this meant remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness. This means he wants the democrats and republicans to unite for the good of the country.
phrasing meaning
Phrasing meaning
  • “Let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us.” This means that both sides of humanity should be united by our indifference not our differences.
  • To our sister republics south of our border, we offer a special pledge—to convert our good words into good deeds—in a new alliance for progress—to assist free men and free governments in casting off the chains of poverty. Here JFK is stating that we should not just say were are going to make a difference but we are actually going to make a difference.
powerfull lines
POWERFULL LINES
  • And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.
  • My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.
  • To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends.
literary device
Literary Device
  • The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country and all who serve it—and the glow from that fire can truly light the world
  • America as a whole is compared to as the light, and the energy from that glow can start a fire that can light the world.
what follows
What follows
  • Till this day people say that this acceptance speech was one of the best speeches ever given in history.
  • This speech set many goals planned out to the future of what was to come with John F. Kennedy as president.
  • He sets aside in attempts of making a more peaceful country
  • In my opinion I couldn’t have picked a better speech