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New Estimates of Broadband Supply and Demand

New Estimates of Broadband Supply and Demand

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New Estimates of Broadband Supply and Demand

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  1. New Estimates of Broadband Supply and Demand June 17, 2005 Wei-Min Hu and James E. Prieger Department of Economics University of California, Davis jeprieger@ucdavis.edu

  2. Broadband Access to the Internet • The Latest Dimension of the Digital Divide • U.S. Telecommunications Act of 1996: encourages the “reasonable and timely” deployment of broadband to all Americans. • FCC has considered whether to add broadband to the Universal Service program. • Therefore, the diffusion of broadband requires measurement and scrutiny.

  3. Broadband Access to the Internet • This Study • Examines the supply and demand sides of the end-user broadband market. • Uses an unexploited dataset of where DSL is available and where it is subscribed to. • Research Questions: • What role do race, ethnicity, and income play in the supply and demand decisions? • What is the role of competition in telecommunications for broadband S&D?

  4. Plan of Talk • Background on Broadband Internet Access • Describe the Data • Results • Deployment • Demand in areas where DSL is supplied • Conclusions

  5. Market Shares of Broadband Technologies in the U.S. Residential and Small Business Broadband Lines (National, 2000)

  6. Broadband is Increasing in the U.S.

  7. The Data • In 2000, Ameritech was required by regulators to say where DSL was available. • Condition for merger approval with SBC • Ameritech lagged behind other BOCs • Ameritech provided a list of their DSL subscribers by ZIP+4. • Data are binary: DSL is subscribed to by at least one household in the ZIP+4 area • Also know the earliest subscription date for the ZIP+4 area.

  8. The Data • Supplement with: • GIS data on ZIP+4 locations • A telecommunications central office database (GIS) • Census data on demographics (block level) • Census data on business characteristics (ZIP code level) • FCC list of ZIP codes with at least one CLEC. • Eventually will add: • Cable company information (cable modem) • More complete CLEC information

  9. DSL Subscribers in the Ameritech Region

  10. Characteristics of DSL Deployment • DSL is implemented in the LEC’s Central Office • As a marketing decision, is available to all neighborhoods in area… • but only if they are close enough to CO • Transmission speeds degrade beyond 2.2 miles. • Ameritech clearly had 1.5 miles as a threshold • The distance threshold is clearly visible:

  11. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: April 1999

  12. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: June 1999

  13. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: August 1999

  14. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: Oct. 1999

  15. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: Dec. 1999

  16. DSL Diffusion in Illinois: Feb. 2000

  17. Implications for Supply and Demand Estimations • Deployment decision: • The marketing characteristics of the whole central office area aren’t relevant, just a subset. • Demand decision: • Need to restrict attention to households within 1.5 miles of the central office. • This matters most in non-urban COs

  18. Estimation Strategy – Supply Side • Unit of decision-making: central office area. • Universe: Ameritech central offices in the five state region • Model DSL availability as a probit regression on area characteristics.

  19. Results of Deployment Probits

  20. Results of Deployment Probits • When add all variables (estimation 4): • No race or income (!) variables are significant • CLEC presence: no significant effect • Commuting: • Work at home: + • Longer commute: + (except longest group) • Cost variables • Population density + / Rural – • Phone density + • Structure Age (proxy for age of network infrastructure): - (at least above median)

  21. Estimation Strategy: Demand Side • Unit of Observation isCensus block • Y=1 if any of the DSL ZIP+4’s fall into that block • So at least on household or business subscribes in the block • Include blocks within 1.5 miles of a CO in which DSL is deployed.

  22. Estimation Strategy: Demand Side • The demand decision is a function of the utility of the relevant options DSL: UDSL = bDSL’x+eDSL No DSL: U0 = 0 • The “outside option” has to stand in for dial-up, cable modem, and no access. • Household subscribes to DSL if it gives the most utility: UDSL > 0

  23. Estimation Strategy: Demand Side • Specify eDSL as standard normal: probit binary choice model • Then Prob(at least one HH in ZIP+4 area j has DSL) iswhere Pi is F(-b’x). • Do not observe HH demographics, so assign Census block average to all HH in block. • Do MLE.

  24. Results of Demand Estimations

  25. Results of Demand Estimations • When add all variables: • CLEC present: demand down 2.2 % pts • Asians & Hispanics (not Blacks): - • Income: + • Household size: + • Distance from CO: -

  26. Diffusion Curve over Time • The coefficient on time since DSL deployed in the area implies a diffusion curve:

  27. Business Demand • A limitation of the structural demand model: all demand assumed from HH • Businesses account for 20% of DSL • Do not know how many firms are in Census block area • Solution: switch to reduced form probits • Business variables appear to matter • % in NAICS categories • Size of businesses

  28. Conclusions • This is an interesting, unique dataset to explore. • Neither race nor income matters in supply • Interesting, given the regulators’ concerns! • Race matters and income matter in demand estimations. • Asians, Hispanics, and other races have less D • Competition from CLECs doesn’t significantly affect deployment decision. • Competition from CLECs reduces demand for incumbent’s product.