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GRE Workshop: Introduction and Group Work. By Kathy Bussert-Webb, Ph.D., January 22, 2011, 10:30-12 noon, EDBC 2.236. This workshop is open to current and future UTB College of Education students. Why should I worry about a good GRE score?.

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gre workshop introduction and group work
GRE Workshop: Introduction and Group Work

By Kathy Bussert-Webb, Ph.D., January 22, 2011, 10:30-12 noon,EDBC 2.236. This workshop is open to current and future UTB College of Education students.

why should i worry about a good gre score
Why should I worry about a good GRE score?

Most graduate programs require a good GRE score for unconditional admission. In the M.Ed. Reading Specialist Program, we require a 450 verbal, a 450 quantitative, and a 4.0 analytical for unconditional admission. For conditional admission, we require a 300 on the verbal section and 300 on the quantitative section for conditional admission.

why should i worry about a good gre score1
Why should I worry about a good GRE score?
  • In the Doctoral Program in Curriculum and Instruction with different specializations, a good combined GRE score would be 1,000, but other criteria are involved.
  • Please contact Bobbette M. Morgan, Ed. D., Office of Graduate Programs Director, bobbette.morgan@utb.edu or her secretary, Ms. Alma Tapia, alma.tapia@utb.edu, for more information. 
what score do i need to get into the program i want
What score do I need to get into the program I want?
  • Please check with the program you are interested in enrolling in to determine the GRE requirements.
  • The Graduate Program Coordinator or Department Chair should know.
  • Mari Stevens in the Graduate Studies Office also has this information.
what does the gre consist of
What does the GRE consist of?
  • Analytical Writing — Measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills, specifically the test taker's ability to articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively
  • Verbal Reasoning — Measures reading comprehension skills and verbal and analogical reasoning skills, focusing on the test taker's ability to analyze and evaluate written material
  • Quantitative Reasoning — Measures problem-solving ability, focusing on basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/about
what does the gre consist of1
What does the GRE consist of?
  • Verbal Reasoning (computer-based, 30 questions 30 minutes; paper-based, 76 questions, 38 per section, 60 minutes)
  • Quantitative Reasoning (computer-based, 28 questions, 45 minutes; paper based, 60 questions, 60 minutes)
  • Plus there are unscored sections with varying times after the Analytical Writing section; these are not counted as part of your score.
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/GRE/general/about/content/
what does the verbal section consist of
What does the verbal section consist of?
  • Analogies — Analogy questions test your ability to recognize parallel relationships. Examples are relationships of kind, size, spatial contiguity or degree.
  • Antonyms — Antonym questions measure the strength of your vocabulary and ability to reason from a given concept to its opposite. Answer choices may be single words or phrases.
  • Sentence Completions — Sentence completion questions measure your ability to use a variety of cues provided by syntax and grammar to recognize the overall meaning of a sentence and analyze the relationships among the component parts of the sentence. You select which of five words or sets of words can best complete a sentence to give it a logically satisfying meaning and allow it to be read as a stylistically integrated whole.
  • Reading Comprehension — Reading comprehension questions measure your ability to read with understanding, insight and discrimination. These questions explore your ability to analyze a written passage from several perspectives, including your ability to recognize explicitly stated elements as well as underlying statements or arguments and their implications.
  • This is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/about/content/verbal/
what does the quantitative section consist of
What does the quantitative section consist of?
  • Quantitative Comparison — These questions test your ability to reason quickly and accurately about the relative sizes of two quantities or to perceive that not enough information is provided to make such a comparison.
  • Problem Solving — The format of these multiple-choice questions varies. The solution may require simple computations, manipulations or multistep problem-solving.
  • Data Interpretation — Some problem-solving questions involve data analysis. Many occur in sets of two to five questions that share common data in the form of tables or graphs that allow you to read or estimate data values.
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/about/content/quantitative/
where are places i can practice for the quantitative section
Where are places I can practice for the quantitative section?
  • http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/quantitative/comparison

(quantitative comparisons)

  • http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/quantitative/problem_solving

(problem solving)

  • http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/quantitative/data_interpretation

(data interpretation)

what does the gre consist of2
What does the GRE consist of?

Analytical Writing:

One Issue task (45 minutes computer or paper version).  For the Issue task, two essay topics are presented and you choose one.

One Argument task (30 minutes computer or paper version). The Argument task does not present a choice of topics; instead, a single topic is presented.

  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/GRE/general/about/content/
what s the difference between an issue and argument task
What’s the difference between an Issue and Argument task?
  • The Issue task states an opinion on an issue of general interest and asks you to address the issue from any perspective(s) you wish, as long as you provide relevant reasons and examples to explain and support your views.
  • The Argument task requires you to critique an argument by discussing how well-reasoned you find it. You are asked to consider the logical soundness of the argument rather than to agree or disagree with the position it presents.
  • The Issue task requires you to construct a personal argument about an issue, and the argument task requires you to critique someone else's argument by assessing its claims.
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/about/content/analytical/
what does the analytical writing section measure
What does the Analytical Writing section measure?

The Analytic Writing Section tests your ability to:

  • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively
  • examine claims and accompanying evidence
  • support an argument with relevant reasons and examples
  • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion
  • control the elements of standard written English (this factor plays a role only to the extent that poor writing skills impede readers' understanding of the argument)

This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/about/content/analytical/

what are some examples of issues i may be asked to write about
What are some examples of issues I may be asked to write about?
  • Present your perspective on the issue below, using relevant reasons and/or examples.
  • "Important truths begin as outrageous, or at least uncomfortable, attacks upon the accepted wisdom of the time."
  • "Originality does not mean thinking something that was never thought before; it means putting old ideas together in new ways."
  • "Laws should not be rigid or fixed. Instead, they should be flexible enough to take account of various circumstances, times, and places."
  • "It is always an individual who is the impetus for innovation; the details may be worked out by a team, but true innovation results from the enterprise and unique perception of an individual."
  • "The function of science is to reassure; the purpose of art is to upset. Therein lies the value of each."
  • "The study of an academic discipline alters the way we perceive the world. After studying the discipline, we see the same world as before, but with different eyes."
  • "It is possible to pass laws that control or place limits on people's behavior, but legislation cannot reform human nature. Laws cannot change what is in people's hearts and minds."
  • "What most human beings really want to attain is not knowledge, but certainty. Gaining real knowledge requires taking risks and keeping the mind open—but most people prefer to be reassured rather than to learn the complex and often unsettling truth about anything.“
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/analytical/issues
what are some examples of arguments i may be asked to critique
What are some examples of arguments I may be asked to critique?
  • Discuss how well reasoned you find this argument.
  • A recent study shows that people living on the continent of North America suffer 9 times more chronic fatigue and 31 times more chronic depression than do people living on the continent of Asia. Interestingly, Asians, on average, eat 20 grams of soy per day, whereas North Americans eat virtually none. It turns out that soy contains phytochemicals called isoflavones, which have been found to possess disease–preventing properties. Thus, North Americans should consider eating soy on a regular basis as a way of preventing fatigue and depression.
  • This is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/analytical/argument
what are some examples of arguments i may be asked to critique1
What are some examples of arguments I may be asked to critique?
  • Discuss how well reasoned you find this argument.
  • "In order to save a considerable amount of money, Rockingham's century-old town hall should be torn down and replaced by the larger and more energy-efficient building that some citizens have proposed. The old town hall is too small to comfortably accommodate the number of people who are employed by the town. In addition, it is very costly to heat the old hall in winter and cool it in summer. The new, larger building would be more energy efficient, costing less per square foot to heat and cool than the old hall. Furthermore, it would be possible to rent out some of the space in the new building, thereby generating income for the town of Rockingham.“
  • This is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/sample_questions/analytical/argument
how can i get feedback on my gre analytic section
How can I get feedback on my GRE analytic section?
  • The ScoreItNow service gives users:
  • practice for the Analytical Writing section of the GRE General Test
  • a variety of essay topics to choose from
  • opportunity to compose essays either online or offline
  • immediate feedback so students can measure their own progress
  • general suggestions for improving essay writing skills
  • benchmark essay responses at each score point
  • The service costs U.S.$13, and entitles the user to write two essays and receive an e-rater score for each.
  • This information is from: http://www.ets.org/gre/general/prepare/scoreitnow
when and where is the gre test
When and where is the GRE test?
  • It is offered electronically in the UTB Testing Office in Tandy, 216, at 8:30 a.m., but you need to arrive at 8 a.m.
  • It is offered at UTB several days a month. For instance, it will be offered on Jan. 25, 26, 27, 31, February 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, etc.
  • The computer-based test lasts 4 hours, so you should be finished at 12:30. Each section is timed.
how do i register for the test and how much is the gre
How do I register for the test and how much is the GRE?
  • Go to GRE.org. In the middle you will see :
  • General Test >(If you test before August 1, 2011), then register for the old test.
  • Continue clicking. You will be asked to register for a computer-based test or a paper test. A paper-based test is only available in places that don’t have Internet access.
  • The test is $160.00.
should i just take the gre without studying
Should I just take the GRE without studying?
  • No, because the point is to get accepted into your program. You don’t want to have to retake the test, which is expensive, or be denied admission because your GRE scores were too low.
when and what is the revised gre
When and what is the revised GRE?
  • The revised GRE includes vocabulary in context, real-life math scenarios, data interpretation, and focused writing prompts.
  • Registration opens for the revised test on March 15, 2011.
  • The first revised test administration will take place on August 1, 2011.
  • Revised test preparation materials:
  • http://www.ets.org/GRE/revised_general/prepare
test taking tips
Test-taking tips:
  • Find a study buddy and practice together frequently.
  • Go to www.ets.org and practice or buy a study guide at a bookstore.
  • Do whatever it takes to sleep well the night before.
  • Eat a high protein breakfast and complex carbohydrates before the test.
  • Don’t be fooled by long distracters.
  • Risk unknown words in the answers if you eliminated the other distracters.
  • Eliminate all distracters, not just one or two.
practice the verbal section with people from the same program you are interested in
Practice the verbal section with people from the same program you are interested in:
  • Language, Literacy, and Intercultural Studies

(Reading Specialist, Bilingual Education, ESL)

  • Teaching, Learning, and Innovation (Math, Science, Technology, Curriculum and Instruction)
  • Educational Psychology and Leadership (Special Education programs, Early Childhood, Counseling, Ed. Leadership programs)
  • Health and Human Performance (C&I with a specialization in Health and Human Performance)