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  1. Changing Perceptions: Korea Paul Yoo SIS 600 Dr. Assenov py3625a@student.american.edu

  2. Research Question & Hypothesis • Has time assuaged the hostile perceptions of South Koreans towards North Korea? • H0: Age and Hostile perceptions of North Korea are not statistically related. • H1: Age and Hostile perceptions of North Korea are statistically related.

  3. Literature Review • Miejeong Han and Sei-Hill Kim, “South Koreans’ perceptions of North Koreans and implications for public relations campaigns,” Public Relations Review 30 (2004): 327-333. • The theory used in this research paper is based upon the idea of reunification and the best way to reunify. “Since South and North Koreans have lived in radically different social systems over 50 years, psychological integration should be established first in order to facilitate the process of reunification.” Han and Kim, 328 • The significance of the study is that South Koreans viewed North Koreans as “less authoritarian, less criminal, and less hostile than themselves.” Han and Kim, 330 • Peter Hays Gries, et al., “Historical beliefs and the perception of threat in Northeast Asia: colonialism, the tributary system, and China – Japan – Korea relations in the twenty-first century,” International Relations of the Asia-Pacific Vol. 9 (2009): 245-265. • Support Gerrit W. Gong’s theory that “conflicts about the past shape the future” in terms of Northeast Asian relations.

  4. Data • Independent Variables: • Age (Group): Ordinal • Gender: Nominal • Occupation (Group): Nominal • Education (Group): Ordinal • Monthly Income (Group): Ordinal • Dependent Variable: • Countries and Thermometers North Korea: Ordinal • 0 = Favorable, 1 = Unfavorable.

  5. Descriptive Statistics • Table 1: Descriptive Statistics

  6. Bivariate Analysis • Table 5: Chi Squared, Lambda Statistics, and Gamma Statistics using c330_1recode (Countries and Thermometers North Korea) 0 = Favorable, 1 = Unfavorable

  7. Probit Analysis • Table 6: Estimates, Dependent Variable - Countries and Thermometers North Korea: Favorable Opinion = 0, Unfavorable Opinion = 1 • 1 = Male, 2 = Female • 1 = middle school graduate or lower, 2 = high school graduate, 3 = college student or higher • 1 = less than 1,000,000 won, 2 = 1,010,000 – 2,000,000 won, 3 = 2,010,000 – 3,000,000 won, 4 = 3,010,000 - 5,000,000 won, 5 = 5,0101,000 – 10,000,000 won, 6 = above 10,010,000 won

  8. Results & Policy Proposal • We reject the H0 and accept the H1. • Since the younger generations have a less hostile view towards North Koreans, time favors a more peaceful solution. The South Korean government should not try anything radical in attempts to reduce hostile perceptions. • Females tend to favor negative opinions towards North Korea, which is surprising because all South Korean males serve a mandatory military service, which I though would increase their negative perceptions of North Korea. Further research is required to understand why females tend to have negative attitudes towards North Korea.